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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009 edited
     
    Tell us what your favorite Panniers are. how do you carry your stuff?
    • CommentAuthorcoma13
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    I'd like to hear some feedback on this. I'm building a townie-ish bike that I'm going to be carrying books, clothes, etc on a daily basis on. I'd like to not carry a bag on my back and get all sweaty.
    • CommentAuthorTom@VC
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009 edited
     
    can you spin the "B's" with front panniers:face-devil-grin:
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009 edited
     
    [quote][cite] coma13:[/cite]I'd like to hear some feedback on this. I'm building a townie-ish bike that I'm going to be carrying books, clothes, etc on a daily basis on. I'd like to not carry a bag on my back and get all sweaty.[/quote]

    you have all kinds of options in all kinds of price points. you can go from super simple grocery bag paniers all the way to water proof touring panniers. it all comes down to the features that you want. if you stop in the shop i can show in person all the options.
  1.  
    A good simple system for clothes, books, etc. is a good sturdy rear rack and a milk crate. You can drop your gym bag, books, etc into the crate. I have used this system for many years and much like it.

    My better half, though, prefers the Jandd grocery panniers. They fold flat to your bike when not in use, but drop down when you need them.
    www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FGBP

    When I am touring, I really like nice touring panniers like Wayne at the touring store sells, but I find them too cumbersome for daily commuting.
    www.thetouringstore.com
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      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2009
     
    I'm thinking about a front basket. Does anyone know of one that will work with road drop bars? It would be doubly awesome if it were easily romoveable also, but that's probably asking too much.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2009
     
    Hey, Pirati. Wald makes lots of solid baskets in Kentucky. Some can be lashed to a rack, some connect at the dropouts, and others are detachable. I have a large one lashed to my front Nitto M12 rack with zip ties and it works great.
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2009
     
    I have some approx. 20 year old Performance brand panniers that I bought cheap on a close-out. I've had to repair them over the years (the stitching is less than stellar). They're not great but they're good enough for carrying clothes when commuting.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2009 edited
     
    I got a set of kangaroos, tried them out but still like my backpack, going to try mounting my alice packs to my bike.
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2009
     
    Anyone have experience with front racks similar to <a href="http://www.velo-orange.com/cofrra.html">these</a>? Friday I saw a road bike locked up near the old Railway building that had one and it seemed a cool way to hold things.. just wondering about handling, easy of use, durability?
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2009
     
    they do look nice although not as nice as Nitto IMHO.

    if panniers are good enough a low-rider rack would carry the load better. if you really need the upper flat part to strap things too than this would be better although the higher the load the more you'll feel it in the steering.
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      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2009
     
    The Peace Pedalers guy (http://www.peacepedalers.com/) was selling stuff on ebay and I got a pair of new Ortlieb Bikepacker Plus panniers for $90. They're usually $200. I was so stoked.
    They're fantastic bags, but huge. I got them for a tour I'm planning, but I sometimes commute with just one. I can take them on and off the bike in zero seconds but they're super secure.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2009
     
    yeah, Ortlieb's are pretty serious bags.
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      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    coma13:I'd like to hear some feedback on this. I'm building a townie-ish bike that I'm going to be carrying books, clothes, etc on a daily basis on. I'd like to not carry a bag on my back and get all sweaty.


    I use a Jandd commuter pannier that has a secure spot for a laptop (although you need to buy their laptop pouch) plus ample room for clothes, lunch, and commuting tools. It has an expanding zipper that really allows you fill the bag up. Not a real sexy product, very utilitarian but Jandd's sure are sturdy.
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      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    I bought a grocery bag pannier last week, and the thing refuses to stay on my rack. It has the same hooks that my commuter pannier has, but the bungee at the bottom is just a flimsy string. Any ideas for how to jury-rig a restraint system that will actually keep the bag on? It seems to be fine when it's fully loaded, but you have to start your trip with an empty bag if the goal is to fill it up, right?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    can you just put a stronger bungee cord on it?
    •  
      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    Yeah, I was thinking that might do it. It is strange because the bungee mounts fairly high up, and is just a single cord, not a big double strapped V shape with a low retainer. I've got a couple ideas for how to maybe fix it.
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      CommentAuthormissler
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2009
     
    I use a Basil Mirte pannier on my 3 speed. It holds one grocery bag's worth of stuff and has a waterproof exterior and a small inner pocket. It hooks onto my rear rack with two clamps that zip away when I carry it as a handbag.



    Overly girly, but its Delft tile pattern goes perfectly with my Dutch-type bike.

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      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2009
     
    I'm looking for some front carrying capacity, but I don't think I need low-riders and a whole other set of panniers in front. I've got a pair of in-line brakes so I don't know if a handlebar bag would fit well. But I love the looks Rivendell Lil Loaf with their Nitto Mini Front Rack.

    Are there any similar rack/bag combos you guys like? Maybe one that wouldn't cost $180?
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2009 edited
     
    Bags are expensive. I have an Acorn Boxy Rando bag on order, but they are a small two-person shop and will not be taking new orders until May. Berthouhds (I think there's one on an old Motobecane at VC), Ostrich, and the Jitensha bag are boxy randonneur bags with the map holder on top. Adam's Zugster bags are cool - google that. They're bigger than the Baggins Loafer bags (which are very nice). Another less expensive option would be to get a made-in-Kentucky Wald basket, and either lash it to your front rack with zip ties or get the kind that have the stays down to the fork ends. I use that on my singlespeed which makes the bike great for errands.

    Right now, I am thinking of using my dividend from REI for a pair of Ortliebs - probably the back rollers (although I like the tidiness of the smaller front rollers - cool until I need to carry camping supplies this summer).
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      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    Man, looks like lots of folks aren't taking orders right now. Confound this spike in cycling popularity, of which I am definitely a part!
    If I had any skills whatsoever, I'd say now would be a good time to get into making handmade bicycle accessories. Nobody can afford a car anymore, and eventually they'll realize that you can get a great bike for 1/15th the price. And when the international shipping system breaks down, locally-made products will actually be cheaper than imports again, like it should be.
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> Andy:</cite> And when the international shipping system breaks down, locally-made products will actually be cheaper than imports again, like it should be.</blockquote>

    When? the international shipping system breaks down?

    Huh?
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009
     
    If anyone knows where to get bolts of heavy canvas I wouldn't mind sewing up some saddle bags for sale
  2.  
    I saw that Joanne's Fabric sells sunbrella canvas which is weather proof and water repellant. It comes in quite a few different colors.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009
     
    Thank you, I was thinking of making a set of parfleches but out of modern material for my bike.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009 edited
     
    <blockquote><cite> 1rider:</cite>I saw that Joanne's Fabric sells sunbrella canvas which is weather proof and water repellant. It comes in quite a few different colors.</blockquote> There was a place out near Ramona that sold Canvas for years. You might want to check out the thrift shops: they have stuff sometimes you can manipulate into what you'd like. I tell you what, I love making stuff by my own hands, but many times, the total cost of what I make ends up exceeding what I'd pay a place to get something new. Take bags: there was a kid in LA with a pretty <a href="http://eeio.blogspot.com/2004/12/recycled-banner-golden-mean-messenger.html ">cool blog that had plans for a messenger bag.</a>. I figured I could make my own for cheap. I mean a good back is a buck fifty now days. Canvas cost, dirt cheap. But, adding in the cost of destroying a sewing machine (which is what happened to a few people I know), the cost of an industrial machine, good thread, the time spent getting truck tarp for a liner ~ making a couple of them to get it right, combined with the cost of time getting said supplies... $ and time, the premade worked. But making things on your own is cool too. I just think some people don't think it through in the factor of thier time. but if you're looking to make a bag: go to a sign shop, they have older banner materail that is good stuff, but only if you have an industrial machine.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009
     
    I used my REI dividend to buy some Ortlieb Backrollers. Kind of much for San Diego, But I do a lot of riding in the Bay Area (in-laws up there) and central coast. They will go on my touring bike, but also useful on the folder:

    Photobucket

    I'd still love to look at some cool duck canvas panniers.
    •  
      CommentAuthortawnya
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009
     
    Davbu4:If anyone knows where to get bolts of heavy canvas I wouldn't mind sewing up some saddle bags for sale


    Check out discount fabrics on Adams ave in Normal Heights. They have a lot of great colors of canvas that has waterproofing on the back side. It's heavy, but not too thick, and it won't stick to your machine's foot pedal if you keep the waterproof side folded under. And it's only 10$/yd at a small, locally owned business.:face-smile:
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    Is that the place in the old theater?
    •  
      CommentAuthortawnya
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    One and the same!
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    Thanks to everybodies ideas, I'm going to explore all these places and see what the most practical...
    • CommentAuthorsurlygurl
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> tawnya:</cite>One and the same!</blockquote>

    Cool place and cooool people there.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    I really liked the article about the handmade racks that is what I want to do to my bike, especially the lic. plate fenders..
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> Davbu4:</cite>I really liked the article about the handmade racks that is what I want to do to my bike, especially the lic. plate fenders..</blockquote>

    MIght be a bit much to push around the city.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2009 edited
     
    What doesn't kill me can only make me stronger,(I hope)heheheheheI guess that was one reason I re-enlisted with the marines at 30 did boot camp here too. What I would like in a bike is a hummer H1 of bikes, not the GM dealership wannabe govenatormobile clone, but the OD green stripped out diesel go anywhere mud covered camp machine. Function and capability at a low cost is what is I'm looking for.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2009 edited
     
    There are a lot of nice bikes out ther, mainly, the important advice is to get one that you'll ride. My only caution is based on my experience. I built a super nice bike and then didn't ride it because I didn't want to trash it. Once I got past that, I was pushing to much of a gear. I was bag shoping, and thinking that I wasn't gonna ride for a few days because the gearing was making me really tired. So, I ditched the bag for a while and got a new chainring. I ride more. Hate to see you build something that you won't want to ride, that's all.

    I'd say something akin to what il pirati has is cool. Cyclecross styel frame with wider tires, racks.. very versitile, quick for flying around town, but you can load it up for touring. VC had a bunch of bikes in that catagory. My next bike will likely be something similar.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2009
     
    Oh, for the record: the HMV is the worst off road vehicle ever. Poor reliablity, an engine that isn't diesel but a gas engine converted to diesel (no power, poor reliablity). The IDS front and rear handle worse than solid axle due to the way they are set up geom. wise. reduction gearing at the hub is poor, though the lockers aren't bad. Once they were uparmoured, they were even worse dogs, overheating constantly. The CTIS, a cool idea, would snap off to the point they were all ordered removed. For the size, it could barely hold 5 people and minor gear. Fuel range was stupid minimal and the design was enormously proprietary; such that tailights cost 110. The under carrage acted like a GREAT mud anchor, as the flat under body would create suction on goo. They come in a close second with the Ford Bronco II as the Pinto of Off road capable.

    Did I mention they suck? No cup holders or stereo either!! :face-smile:
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2009
     
    The ones I drove in the military were very easy to fix and opperate. I also am pretty minimalist in the amount of gear I would be willing to carry under (4000 cu in.).As for your bike I would love to see pics.
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2009
     
    Look in the introduction photos for Il Parati's bike.. I'm gonna model it similar to his.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2009
     
    I really like that ibis hakkalugi piced in the Bobbish thread
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2009 edited
     
    Protorio:I have an Acorn Boxy Rando bag on order, but they are a small two-person shop and will not be taking new orders until May.
    I hate to pour fuel on the hysteria, but Acorn opened up for orders today at 09:00 AM PST (they have not accepted orders in one month): When I logged on at 09:45 AM their entire stock of every product for the month was sold out...

    He has one of his Roll Bags up for sale on "that" auction site (Item #320391117317, FYI) - I wonder how much of a premium over MSRP ($48) that bag will now command at closing.

    He is in an enviable position to sell out one month's of manufacturing in less than an hour: If it was my business and livelihood, I am pretty sure I would 1) hike my prices and 2) hire an extra seamstress or seamster (is that a word?).
    •  
      CommentAuthorShapps
    • CommentTimeAug 28th 2009
     
    Just a heads up since i know some others here may be interested. Acorn has a few bags left for sale on the website right now. I just picked up the handlebar bags and a med/lrg saddlebag.

    http://www.acornbags.com/
    • CommentAuthorrandomjive
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2010
     
    Alright, so I was looking at panniers and what not, but I also saw these



    What do you guys think? Any experience with the Wald rear-folding baskets?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2010
     
    Those are the H2's and newer H1's.

    The original H1's were exactly right for the job. I worked for someone (not going to drop names) that had 3 of them converted into firetrucks for their estate.

    William:Oh, for the record: the HMV is the worst off road vehicle ever. Poor reliablity, an engine that isn't diesel but a gas engine converted to diesel (no power, poor reliablity). The IDS front and rear handle worse than solid axle due to the way they are set up geom. wise. reduction gearing at the hub is poor, though the lockers aren't bad. Once they were uparmoured, they were even worse dogs, overheating constantly. The CTIS, a cool idea, would snap off to the point they were all ordered removed. For the size, it could barely hold 5 people and minor gear. Fuel range was stupid minimal and the design was enormously proprietary; such that tailights cost 110. The under carrage acted like a GREAT mud anchor, as the flat under body would create suction on goo. They come in a close second with the Ford Bronco II as the Pinto of Off road capable.

    Did I mention they suck? No cup holders or stereo either!! :face-smile:
    •  
      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2010
     
    What do you guys think? Any experience with the Wald rear-folding baskets?

    I've used them. I slit some vinyl tubing over selected areas to keep them from rattling when collapsed. The collapsing comes in handy when you park in a bike rack. I like that you can carry quite a bit of weight with them, and not crush everything like you do with soft panniers. Although I never had a complaint with the baskets, ultimately I switched over to removable, rigid baskets. I can carry them into the market, know if I have enough room when shopping, and detach when I get home to unload.
    • CommentAuthorjacobk
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2010
     
    What do you guys think? Any experience with the Wald rear-folding baskets?

    I bought a single one of these a couple months ago, my first impressions were that it was smaller than I expected and a lot heavier than I expected. It's pretty sturdy, the hardware it came with to connect it to the rack is a little weak but if you supplement it with two zip ties on the top it helps a lot and one ziptie down lower to hold it in to the lower supporting bar on the rack really helps it from rattling around.

    It's big enough to hold one of the reusable grocery bags, so you can take one of those with you, take it into the store and then just toss it in the basket when you leave. I ended up taking it off my bike and I just usually use soft panniers and/or a backpack now, but I'm not usually carrying eggs or anything fragile or crushable.
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2010
     
    I'm very happy with my Carradice Barley canvas saddlebags for having essentials on hand riding around town for the day. They are quite roomy. For touring and larger loads, I've used Arkel bags. I've done 5 day credit card tours withjust the T-28 and a handlebar bag.

    The Arkels I have aren't water proof, but so far I've been lucky and it hasn't mattered. You can get rain covers too.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2010 edited
     
    i just became an Arkel dealer simply because i wanted some of their bags for my touring bike. good quality stuff. the rain covers solve the whole rain issue. we still don't have any of it in the store but we also have an account now with Tubus racks, Caradice bags, and Ortleib. i got all those accounts simply because i wanted their stuff for the various personal touring and commuting bikes that i have. i only stock what i personally like and people seem to appreciate that. luckily i have good taste.

    :face-devil-grin:
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2010
     
    by Friday San Diego will have a place to buy waxed canvas Frost River bags. the company has been MIA and in financial trouble for the past few years and just became available again. i have been waiting for ever since i opened the shop 3.5 years ago. they made the bags for Rivendell some years back before they went belly up. good people.