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    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2012
     
    In this story on the Montezuma crash, a commenter named "Joe" seems to be corroborating Tammy Woods' story from the U-T:

    http://www.cbs8.com/story/17543611/bicyclist-struck-and-killed-by-suv-in-talmadge
  1.  
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2012
     
    <blockquote><cite> billd:</cite>The anti-cyclist idiots are at it again:
    [[_linker_]]

    [[_linker_]]
    Your responses in the comments, Bill, are outstanding. I'm left with nothing to add, which is quite remarkable, I think.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2012
     
    Go ahead and pile on. The more the better in my opinion. We have more power if we speak out collectively.
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2012
     
    You set a high hurdle but I gave it a couple of shots on <a href="http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/apr/20/letters-bicycle-safety/">this one</a>.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2012
     
    Serge2:You set a high hurdle but I gave it a couple of shots on this one.
    You actually covered some points I meant to but missed. Thanks for joining me.

    I noticed that Steve Magas jumped in too. Excellent!
  2.  
    Good work, guys.
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2012
     
    This needs to be extended to newspaper comments:
    •  
      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    I'm done clicking on Union Tribune links. They're trolls. They post "opinion" letters and "stories" that they know to be ignorant and flat-out wrong, simply to generate attention through social media sharing. They know people like us will hear about something extreme and asinine they post, and expect us to pile on with our comments while sharing with others. That's not journalism; that's hosting a battleground forum. They can suck it. I'm done giving them attention. So, unless you copy/paste it here, I'll never care enough to follow the link.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012 edited
     
    Geoff:I'm done clicking on Union Tribune links.
    Good strategy. And while we're at it, do not ever read - and don't even dream of posting to - the comments section. This "abstain" strategy works with other "news" sources than Uniontrib, too.

    These are not the kind of places where policies are created or opinions formed, despite what some might think.
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    <blockquote><cite> Geoff:</cite>I'm done clicking on Union Tribune links. They're trolls. They post "opinion" letters and "stories" that they know to be ignorant and flat-out wrong, simply to generate attention through social media sharing. They know people like us will hear about something extreme and asinine they post, and expect us to pile on with our comments while sharing with others. That's not journalism; that's hosting a battleground forum. They can suck it. I'm done giving them attention. So, unless you copy/paste it here, I'll never care enough to follow the link.</blockquote>
    I wish you were right, but I'm afraid it's a pretty accurate reflection of the zeitgeist. You don't even have to leave the cycling community to hear these opinions, or at least much of the underlying beliefs they are based on. They're not faking. They're not trolling. This is what they actually believe. And the editors are more than likely to agree. Hell, for the most part the police and even many judges agree with them.

    But there is hope. The culture can change. After decades of a few people working tirelessly, we're starting to see some improvements. I consider the Trotwood v.s Selz case in Ohio 10 years to be an important milestone, not so much the case itself, but the changes it brought about subsequently in Ohio law regarding cyclist rights, specifically clarification about lane rights, which spread to other states.

    In CA we got sharrows just a few years ago, and just within the last year we got sharrows on roads without curb parking, BMUFL signs, and an explicit designation of how wide a lane must be in order for it to be safely shared (14 feet) in the CA MUTCD (in the specification of where BMUFL signs may be used). Great advancements are being made in the areas of training, especially the Cycling Savvy training out of Orlando, and the traffic engineering training (Caltrans, etc.) being done by Dan Gutierrez out of Long Beach.

    As to the Comments sections, I don't imagine that we can change the opinions of those posting, but they're not the audience. The audience is others who are reading. That's why the idiocy needs to balanced with reasoned explanation, so maybe all those people will be that much less likely to be assholes when they encounter cyclists on the roads. Maybe. If you don't want to participate, that's fine, of course. But anyone who has an inclination (and knowledge and ability, like Billd obviously does), to correct their errors, I encourage them to respond in the Comments, and write their own letters to the editor. The only thing I would say is be polite, respectful and reasonable, no matter how crazy they are. Cutting people down usually reflects worse on the cutter than the cuttee with respect to influencing others.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    Serge2:I wish you were right, but I'm afraid it's a pretty accurate reflection of the zeitgeist. You don't even have to leave the cycling community to hear these opinions, or at least much of the underlying beliefs they are based on. They're not faking. They're not trolling. This is what they actually believe. And the editors are more than likely to agree. Hell, for the most part the police and even many judges agree with them.

    ...

    As to the Comments sections, I don't imagine that we can change the opinions of those posting, but they're not the audience. The audience is others who are reading. That's why the idiocy needs to balanced with reasoned explanation, so maybe all those people will be that much less likely to be assholes when they encounter cyclists on the roads. Maybe. If you don't want to participate, that's fine, of course. But anyone who has an inclination (and knowledge and ability, like Billd obviously does), to correct their errors, I encourage them to respond in the Comments, and write their own letters to the editor. The only thing I would say is be polite, respectful and reasonable, no matter how crazy they are. Cutting people down usually reflects worse on the cutter than the cuttee with respect to influencing others.
    If we don't continuously defend ourselves against these idiots, nothing will ever change. You're right that the audience is much more than the idiots making the anti-cycling arguments. I've noticed some of the arguments I've made showing up in other people's comments in some forums almost verbatim. I don't mind.

    I'm working on being respectful but I find it difficult to not be condescending when people are being complete morons.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012
     
    On Saturday a law enforcement officer shared some inside information with me candidly. The driver who killed the cyclist on Montezuma Road passed the city bus on the left and then cut sharply back to the right across the front of the bus to "teach the driver a lesson" for driving too slowly. The bus obscured the view of the cyclist in the bike lane.

    The DA is preparing to charge the car driver. There will be a charge followed by a lawsuit filed by the victim's family.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012
     
    If one persistent person can literally sue Encinitas into spending 100's of $1000's on sidewalk changes, why can't our local cycling organizations sue the city to get some of the worst road situations (Balboa as an example) fixed?

    As to the Montezuma incident, if this maniac doesn't see hard time it will confirm every bad thing I have come to believe about our legal system.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012
     
    Freeway style design on Kearny Villa Rd. has claimed two lives since 2001.
  3.  
    From Minnesota to Mississippi, America Tells Congress to Preserve Bike-Ped Funding
    From StreetFilms.org


    Ride well and be safe out there.

    OKB
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012 edited
     
    <blockquote><cite> billd:</cite>I've noticed some of the arguments I've made showing up in other people's comments in some forums almost verbatim. I don't mind.</blockquote>
    That's the nature of meme propagation, but when your arguments are comprised of logic and reasoning layered on a few basic principles, your memes (arguments) are much more likely to be used by others not just from copying, but because others are likely to construct very similar arguments, sometimes almost verbatim, from those same principles. I've observed this phenomenon with libertarianism as well as with bicycle driving. I often see stuff I posted on forums years ago being repeated today.

    Meme propagation, by the way, is another reason to keep repeating stuff we want repeated.

    <blockquote><cite> billd:</cite>I'm working on being respectful but I find it difficult to not be condescending when people are being complete morons.</blockquote>
    Just remember, either they are morons in which case you're just being cruel, or they're not actually morons, so there is hope, and that you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Easier said than done, believe me, I know!
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012
     
    wpstoll:On Saturday a law enforcement officer shared some inside information with me candidly. The driver who killed the cyclist on Montezuma Road passed the city bus on the left and then cut sharply back to the right across the front of the bus to "teach the driver a lesson" for driving too slowly. The bus obscured the view of the cyclist in the bike lane.

    The DA is preparing to charge the car driver. There will be a charge followed by a lawsuit filed by the victim's family.
    That would explain how Gilbreth ended up in the ravine and it would explain the damage to the right front end of the SUV that I saw on TV. It would not explain Tammy Woods' story that the bus also hit Gilbreth but perhaps she was mistaken? She got the story second hand from the bus driver and maybe she misunderstood him.

    Every version of this sounds like spectacularly bad driving from the SUV driver. He needs to be facing serious charges and it needs to be very public.
    • CommentAuthorJayKay
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012
     
    I hope your source is correct. Is it realistic to expect charges this week?
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012 edited
     
    Be patient. Once they file charges, the clock starts ticking. It's best that they have their case prepared before they file charges.
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2012
     
    bikingbill:If one persistent person can literally sue Encinitas into spending 100's of $1000's on sidewalk changes, why can't our local cycling organizations sue the city to get some of the worst road situations (Balboa as an example) fixed?

    As to the Montezuma incident, if this maniac doesn't see hard time it will confirm every bad thing I have come to believe about our legal system.


    The Encinitas suit was brought for failure to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. There is no American Bicyclist Accessibility Act unfortunately.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    Stephan:
    bikingbill:If one persistent person can literally sue Encinitas into spending 100's of $1000's on sidewalk changes, why can't our local cycling organizations sue the city to get some of the worst road situations (Balboa as an example) fixed?

    As to the Montezuma incident, if this maniac doesn't see hard time it will confirm every bad thing I have come to believe about our legal system.


    The Encinitas suit was brought for failure to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. There is no American Bicyclist Accessibility Act unfortunately.


    Suing over improper design and/or implementation not to spec (Hello Carlsbad!) seems like a possibility. The Balboa ramp as an example.
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    bikingbill:If one persistent person can literally sue Encinitas into spending 100's of $1000's on sidewalk changes, why can't our local cycling organizations sue the city to get some of the worst road situations (Balboa as an example) fixed?


    Carlsbad is planning to spend millions of dollars to calm/slow traffic on La Costa Ave, largely to avoid another lawsuit like this $2.9M settlement for a motorcycle accident (non-fatal). People had been complaining for years, but it took this lawsuit to get real action.

    http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/carlsbad/article_18e8f262-2e3d-5460-b6d0-2c2d05b0ce3c.html

    Maybe we need to take our battle to the courts. If enough expensive, high profile cases with sympathetic victims are won, that will prompt more action. Steal a page from the Civil Rights movement. And we need plantiffs that are willing to go public and not sign a non-disclosure agreement.

    SDCBC could set up a legal committee of lawyers and interns that are willing to work for free or at reduced rates. The San Diego chapter of the Sierra Club has this and it has been quite effective on conservation issues (though those are different types of lawyers and lawsuits).
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    bossvoss:
    bikingbill:If one persistent person can literally sue Encinitas into spending 100's of $1000's on sidewalk changes, why can't our local cycling organizations sue the city to get some of the worst road situations (Balboa as an example) fixed?


    Carlsbad is planning to spend millions of dollars to calm/slow traffic on La Costa Ave, largely to avoid another lawsuit like this $2.9M settlement for a motorcycle accident (non-fatal). People had been complaining for years, but it took this lawsuit to get real action.

    http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/carlsbad/article_18e8f262-2e3d-5460-b6d0-2c2d05b0ce3c.html

    Maybe we need to take our battle to the courts. If enough expensive, high profile cases with sympathetic victims are won, that will prompt more action. Steal a page from the Civil Rights movement. And we need plantiffs that are willing to go public and not sign a non-disclosure agreement.

    SDCBC could set up a legal committee of lawyers and interns that are willing to work for free or at reduced rates. The San Diego chapter of the Sierra Club has this and it has been quite effective on conservation issues (though those are different types of lawyers and lawsuits).


    Exactly. If a bike lane or exit isn't to 'code' and there is a injury or death, a lawsuit might be the thing that gets the situation rectified.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    bikingbill:
    bossvoss:
    bikingbill:If one persistent person can literally sue Encinitas into spending 100's of $1000's on sidewalk changes, why can't our local cycling organizations sue the city to get some of the worst road situations (Balboa as an example) fixed?


    Carlsbad is planning to spend millions of dollars to calm/slow traffic on La Costa Ave, largely to avoid another lawsuit like this $2.9M settlement for a motorcycle accident (non-fatal). People had been complaining for years, but it took this lawsuit to get real action.

    http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/carlsbad/article_18e8f262-2e3d-5460-b6d0-2c2d05b0ce3c.html

    Maybe we need to take our battle to the courts. If enough expensive, high profile cases with sympathetic victims are won, that will prompt more action. Steal a page from the Civil Rights movement. And we need plantiffs that are willing to go public and not sign a non-disclosure agreement.

    SDCBC could set up a legal committee of lawyers and interns that are willing to work for free or at reduced rates. The San Diego chapter of the Sierra Club has this and it has been quite effective on conservation issues (though those are different types of lawyers and lawsuits).


    Exactly. If a bike lane or exit isn't to 'code' and there is a injury or death, a lawsuit might be the thing that gets the situation rectified.

    doesn't that just leave us chasing ambulances though? ... is it possible to bring these kinda things to court without someone getting maimed or killed? ... by just proving that the conditions are unsafe...?
  4.  
    Civil action typically requires harm - legally (typically) and practically. Remember the 163 - when motorists were running off the road and hitting the trees and killing themselves? It took a dead-citizen for the City and State to install guard-rails. Defective design cases are very expensive, as they are expert-witness driven. I'm game (even if outside my wheelhouse) if we can find a plaintiff.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    The Schwinn Lawyer:Civil action typically requires harm - legally (typically) and practically. Remember the 163 - when motorists were running off the road and hitting the trees and killing themselves? It took a dead-citizen for the City and State to install guard-rails. Defective design cases are very expensive, as they are expert-witness driven. I'm game (even if outside my wheelhouse) if we can find a plaintiff.


    Ideally, these defects (Balboa etc.) would get rectified as a matter of policy, but litigation might be the catalyst that gets the city/county moving in that direction.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012 edited
     
    In today's mayoral election survey in the U-T Fletcher has more than double the support of DeMaio or Filner with 44% to their 18% and 18% respectively. Sounds as if the DeMaio campaign mud-slinging is getting blown back into Chuck's face!

    It's surprising that the U-T would even print the results, considering the right-wing political leanings of their editorial staff and readership.

    It's becoming clear that voters have grown weary of business as usual.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2012
     
    bikingbill:
    The Schwinn Lawyer:Civil action typically requires harm - legally (typically) and practically. Remember the 163 - when motorists were running off the road and hitting the trees and killing themselves? It took a dead-citizen for the City and State to install guard-rails. Defective design cases are very expensive, as they are expert-witness driven. I'm game (even if outside my wheelhouse) if we can find a plaintiff.


    Ideally, these defects (Balboa etc.) would get rectified as a matter of policy, but litigation might be the catalyst that gets the city/county moving in that direction.


    Not trying to throw cold water on this, but just a reality check regarding the Balboa/I-5 incident: I would be very surprised if that interchange was not designed to the standards in affect at the time. Dangerous to cyclists for sure, but unlikely it's not to standard. Current best practice would result in a different design. Fixing the old designs would cost a ton of money. More than enough to pay an army of lawyers.

    That's not to say nothing can be done. Stay angry.
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2012
     
    I would be very surprised if that interchange was not designed to the standards in affect at the time. Dangerous to cyclists for sure, but unlikely it's not to standard. Current best practice would result in a different design. Fixing the old designs would cost a ton of money. More than enough to pay an army of lawyers.


    The same could probably be said about about La Costa Ave. But after the city lost a $2.9M lawsuit, Carlsbad is suddenly willing to spend $10M's to redesign the road (and piss off all the car commuters living inland in new McMansions that use La Costa as a pseudo Freeway)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2012
     
    bossvoss:
    I would be very surprised if that interchange was not designed to the standards in affect at the time. Dangerous to cyclists for sure, but unlikely it's not to standard. Current best practice would result in a different design. Fixing the old designs would cost a ton of money. More than enough to pay an army of lawyers.


    The same could probably be said about about La Costa Ave. But after the city lost a $2.9M lawsuit, Carlsbad is suddenly willing to spend $10M's to redesign the road (and piss off all the car commuters living inland in new McMansions that use La Costa as a pseudo Freeway)


    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2012
     
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/04/24/MNDS1O8C59.DTL

    San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón is preparing to file felony vehicular manslaughter charges against Chris Bucchere, the bicyclist who fatally struck a 71-year-old pedestrian in the Castro district last month.

    The felony charge - which could result in a 16-month sentence for Bucchere if he is convicted - is a sharp contrast to the misdemeanor count prosecutors filed in a case last year in which a bicyclist struck and killed a woman along the Embarcadero.

    The difference this time is prosecutors' conclusion that Bucchere, 35, was grossly negligent in his riding before he ran into Sutchi Hui in a crosswalk at Market and Castro streets March 29.
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2012 edited
     
    "The difference this time is prosecutors' conclusion that Bucchere, 35, was grossly negligent in his riding before he ran into Sutchi Hui in a crosswalk at Market and Castro streets March 29."

    Didn't he sorta incriminate himself by writing something to the effect that he saw the peds crossing and just put his head down and rolled through figuring they'd get out of his way (or something to that effect)? Seems like gross negligence to me. Honestly, if someone on a bicycle ran down and killed one of my family members or someone I cared about like this guy's actions were described I'd want to see them prosecuted to the maximum extent possible.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2012
     
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2012
     
    Incident Number: Date: Time: Beat: Watch Commander:
    41516 04/24/12 0752 122 OFFICER J. JACOBSEN

    Location: 833 TURQUOISE ST. Neighborhood: LA JOLLA



    Type: 2001 FELONY HIT AND RUN


    Synopsis:
    A male in his 50’s was stopped at the red light on La Jolla Mesa on his bicycle preparing to turn left on Turquoise. An unidentified person driving a BMW was executing the same turn and swung into the bicyclist knocking him to the ground, he suffered an injury to his right shoulder and an open fracture to his right elbow. The motorist never stopped and left the scene eastbound on Turquoise St. The male was transported to a local hospital. Traffic Division is handling the investigation.
  5.  
    What the f+++ is going on out there? http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/apr/26/bicyclist-struck-by-vehicle-on-texas-street/

    In the words of OKB, be safe out there.
    • CommentAuthorJayKay
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    Didn't call the police till she was home? Didn't realize she hit someone? WTF! Lets hope the cyclists condition improves
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    Wtf! The cyclist is coming down a little hill there but it's not a spot where you'd really consider running the light.
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    Hopefully the police will investigate this thoroughly. What I don't understand is how the motorist could insist on having seen a green light at that intersection but at the same time have no recollection of hitting and almost killing a cyclist. Would be interesting to see the damage on the car.
  6.  
    I think the reason you don't understand is that it is bullshit.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    These are really starting to pile up. This person must have been wasted.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    The Schwinn Lawyer:What the f+++ is going on out there? http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/apr/26/bicyclist-struck-by-vehicle-on-texas-street/

    In the words of OKB, be safe out there.

    I think you should start a side practice representing cyclists.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    I think you should start a side practice representing cyclists.

    Let's hope that becomes less necessary than recent events warrant.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    this kinda shit makes me wanna scream!!!!!!! and to be honest, i am getting nervous out there... these keep on happening on or very close to the routes i take daily. i take mead down to texas every morning.
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    <blockquote><cite> PacMUle:</cite>this kinda shit makes me wanna scream!!!!!!! and to be honest, i am getting nervous out there... these keep on happening on or very close to the routes i take daily. i take mead down to texas every morning.</blockquote>

    It's easy to read about these things and think we have little to no control. That's not true.

    Make these your habits:

    1) Don't run red lights.
    2) Don't enter on green without checking for red light runners.

    If you don't make those your habits, then the odds of getting hit in an intersection go way up.
    If you do make those your habits, then the odds drop considerably.

    Remember, you have a lot of influence over your safety, more than anyone else, by far.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    Recent events do feel like they're adding up. On Monday, I was *walking* across a street at a 4-stop intersection (Park & Madison, FYI) and was grazed by a Lexus SUV who grew impatient with me and floored it through the intersection. No one got the license plate - it was a middle-aged woman.

    The culture of speeding is becoming a *felt* problem to me, anyway. It must be altered. I'll tell you - I don't drive much, but when I do, I'm driving 5mph below the posted limit. We'll see how that goes over for all these impatient assholes out there.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    I'll be driving at 25 mph down a long residential street like Maryland and drivers will come right up to the back bumper and tailgate. Occasionally one will even cross the centerline and pass me.

    My street is used as a short cut to and from the Academy of Our Lady of Peace (Speed). Parents are the worst offenders, but drivers blow stop signs in front of cross traffic that has the right of way, honk curse and gesture at people trying to leave their driveways, and then haul ass down Kansas St. to Copley, where they blow through that stop sign without even slowing down.

    On a bike, I've been right hooked, honked at, yelled at, and brushed by cars driven by these wonderful Christians. So has a neighbor.

    In 2004 neighbors and I complained and got a two man SDPD motor team to write tickets. They staked out the problem areas once in the morning and once in the afternoon. In one day they wrote 19 citations, mostly for running stop signs.

    When the problem began to worsen once again we asked for another stakeout but received no response this time. A couple of months later I saw the motor sergeant who was the supervisor of the team. He told me candidly that the daughter of someone in a high place in City Hall got a ticket and the father called SDPD and accused them of "heavy-handed traffic enforcement." They were called off!

    The rich and powerful should not be exempt from obeying traffic laws, however inconvenient they may seem. When they are able to successfully hogtie law enforcement it is particularly chilling.

    99% of these folks live outside the area, some coming across the border from Mexico every day. They never think that maybe people live in this modest neighborhood that they blindly use as an extension of the freeway. If we have the audacity to complain about this treatment, we are slapped down hard!
  7.  
    I try to preserve the much slower speed limits I'm used to in Canada (approximately 5-10mph less than CA). But the CA and San Diego speed limits are so high that it is a public safety issue.

    Spring has sprung and I assume many are thinking about riding/walking more due to various reasons. And if they are not aware of the perils speeding vehicles then they will be at risk.

    The smart urban growth is clashing with the increased speed limits around the city.

    Take a look at a link I posted in the Infrastructure thread about Motorists trumps people safety.
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2012
     
    Anecdotal evidence aside, and despite all the concerns about cell phones and distracted drivers, actual 2009 NHTSA data (2010 data does not seem to be out yet) indicates overall safety with respect to motor traffic is increasing across the board. Number of motorist-related fatalities and number of collisions of all types (car-car, car-bike, car-ped) are all going <i>down</i>. They're certainly not going up. The number killed by motor vehicles in 2009, 33,808, is the lowest since 1950 (33,186). Of course that's still a big number, and it is offset somewhat by airbags, safety belt use and other safety innovations, but that has been factored in for years. This represents almost a 10% decline over the 2008 numbers. The number of bicyclist deaths, often referred to as "about 800 per year", dropped to 630 in 2009. You can't explain that with airbags. Given all the hand wringing we hear about distracted and irresponsible cell phone yielding drivers in the bicycling community, I'd expect that number to be double what it was since the inception of cell phones. Even "roadway departure" crashes have dropped by 9%.
    [[_linker_]]