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  1.  


    MAD expansion proposed for east Hillcrest
    April 21st, 2017 By Ken Williams sduptownnews.com
    SANDAG, the regional transportation authority, plans to install protected bicycle lanes in Hillcrest — including on University Avenue and Normal Street — where the proposed new MAD would be located. SANDAG proposes to modify the medians in Zone A to create enough space for the protected bike lanes, but will not maintain the lanes or medians. That means the MAD and SANDAG would have to sign an agreement to maintain the improvements.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2017
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:MAD expansion proposed for east Hillcrest...including on University Avenue
    This is great. But Uni west of 163 needs it much more urgently.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2017
     
    Cycling to work can cut cancer and heart disease, says study (BBC)
    http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39641122
    'It's faster than the bus' and other reasons why people cycle to work
    • CommentAuthorsd_mike
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2017
     
    I'd like to see Normal St get bike lanes or a road diet. Four lanes isn't needed there and what little traffic does traverse the roadway tends to speed. Crossings are also an issue for pedestrians.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2017
     
  2.  
    La Jolla ‘medium priority’ on City bike lane plan; DecoBikes could be needed to bridge travel gaps
    María José Durán April 25th, 2017 lajollalight.com
    On a scale of “medium,” “high” or “higher,” two La Jolla bike lanes among the 90 projects in the San Diego Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC) Strategic Implementation Plan, ranked “medium” in priority. A one-mile stretch of Villa La Jolla Drive (between its two intersections with Gilman Drive) and a 1.2-mile bike lane at La Jolla Village Drive (between Gilman Drive and Regents Road) are in the BAC plans for future construction.

    However, District 1 appointee to the BAC, Nicole Capretz, told La Jolla Light the projects aren’t funded yet. “The list of needs for funding and infrastructure is very long, so (the fact that) La Jolla didn’t make the highest priority just indicates how far we have to go.” She explained the two criteria that determined priority: 1) Projects in traditionally underserved communities and 2) Projects within Vision Zero corridors. (Vision Zero is a City initiative to reach zero traffic deaths by 2025).
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2017
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:La Jolla ‘medium priority’ on City bike lane plan; DecoBikes could be needed to bridge travel gaps
    María José Durán April 25th, 2017 lajollalight.com
    On a scale of “medium,” “high” or “higher,” two La Jolla bike lanes among the 90 projects in the San Diego Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC) Strategic Implementation Plan, ranked “medium” in priority. A one-mile stretch of Villa La Jolla Drive (between its two intersections with Gilman Drive) and a 1.2-mile bike lane at La Jolla Village Drive (between Gilman Drive and Regents Road) are in the BAC plans for future construction.

    However, District 1 appointee to the BAC, Nicole Capretz, told La Jolla Light the projects aren’t funded yet. “The list of needs for funding and infrastructure is very long, so (the fact that) La Jolla didn’t make the highest priority just indicates how far we have to go.” She explained the two criteria that determined priority: 1) Projects in traditionally underserved communities and 2) Projects within Vision Zero corridors. (Vision Zero is a City initiative to reach zero traffic deaths by 2025).


    La Jolla Village Drive between Gilman and Regents should be a pedestrian and bike-friendly conduit for all of the students traveling between UTC and the UCSD campus. Instead, it's basically a freeway that crosses over a freeway. Pedestrian improvements? Are you kidding me? I like a good trail as much as the next guy, but is this really the place for a trail??

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/32%C2%B052'19.9%22N+117%C2%B013'33.5%22W/@32.872184,-117.2265192,160m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d32.872184!4d-117.225972

    What were they smoking when they laid out UCSD and UTC? No wonder all of the UCSD students line up for the shuttle buses in UTC.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 27th 2017 edited
     
    The entire length of LJ Village Dr (between Miramar Rd and TP Rd) needs something a lot more serious than some lines of paint: In fact, I think bike lanes on LJV Dr under its current configuration and driving practices would be detrimental to bicycle safety, as it would create an illusion of safety, when it isn't present. Put it another way - would you recommend students to commute to school via LJV Dr, with or without bike lanes? I sure wouldn't.
    • CommentAuthorsd_mike
    • CommentTimeApr 27th 2017
     
    Speaking of such roadways, Ulric St looks to be getting a median barrier in the near future from Fashion Hills Blvd to David St. While it does increase some safety, I can also see that increasing speeds on the roadway as well. Not sure I think it is a good thing.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2017
     
    I got this email this morning. I think it's pretty sad all the hoops one has to jump through in order to access an unused 4 mile section of trail. Land of the free indeed.

    Here is the link for those inclined.
    http://www.miramar.marines.mil/Portals/164/Docs/MCASMiramar/stowe_trail/Stowe_Trail_Permit_Application.pdf?ver=2017-03-23-173447-927

    The Stowe Trail is approximately 4 miles long and parallels the eastern border of MCAS Miramar and is marked with appropriate signs to facilitate access to the trail by members of the San Diego community who have obtained a valid permit. Applications for permits must be submitted through the MCAS Miramar Provost Marshal’s Office. The official MCAS Miramar website contains pertinent information regarding the process to obtain a permit and appropriate use of the trail.

    *Note: There are no other trails aboard MCAS Miramar that will be opened.



    Stowe Trail Permit Application and Access
    Stowe Trail Permit Application (PDF)

    Stowe Trail Liability Waiver (PDF)

    Follow the instructions below to apply for access to Stowe Trail:

    1. Download the background form and liability waiver via the link on this web page.

    2. Read the liability waiver but DO NOT SIGN, this document must be witnessed at Vehicle Registration. If you do not agree to the liability waiver's provisions you will not be issued a pass and may stop the application here.

    3. Fill out and sign the background document; instructions are on page 2 of the SECNAV 5512/1 form (Stowe Trail Permit Application) .

    4. Bring the completed application/background document and liability waiver, with all required supporting identification in person to B6200, Vehicle Registration, MCAS Miramar (Accessed via I-15, take the Miramar Way exit, then west bound on Miramar Way) Use the right lane and inform the gate sentry that you need to drop off your background form for Stowe Trail.

    5. Allow 10 working days and then call Vehicle Registration at: 858-577-1463 to see if your background application is approved, denied or still pending.

    6. If approved, you will be assigned a specific day that you can come to Building 6200, Vehicle Registration, MCAS Miramar to be photographed and receive your permit.

    7. Enter Vehicle Registration and obtain a copy of your approved background form.

    8. Once you have the background form, take it to the building adjacent to Vehicle Registration.

    9. Provide the form to an official at Vehicle Registration and wait to receive your Stowe Trail identification card (permit).

    Note: Wait times to receive the identification card may vary as uniformed personnel and civilian base employees have priority.

    Note: Only U.S. Citizens are eligible to apply for a Stowe Trail permit.
  3.  
    It is easier to register to vote, or to obtain a US Passport, or get a marriage license, than it is to ride the Stowe Trail. But I'll still probably get a permit. I wonder what they will think when I show up on my bike at the base entrance?
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2017
     
  4.  
    Good Article from The Coast News



    Coastal Commission to decide fate of the Cardiff Rail Trail
    Aaron Burgin May 3, 2017 thecoastnews.com
    The California Coastal Commission next week will decide the placement of a controversial segment of the Coastal Rail Trail, nearly a year after the city reversed course on its preferred alignment. The May 11 meeting begins at 8:30 a.m. at the San Diego County Board of Supervisors chambers at 1600 Pacific Hwy.

    The city’s preferred location of the 1.3-mile so-called “Cardiff Rail Trail” — west of Coast Highway 101 — faces significant headwind, as the Coastal Commission staff has come out in opposition of the proposal.

    The coastal commission’s staff, in its staff report for the May 11 meeting, said it does not support the western alignment because it was not part of a large plan that the agency adopted that covered a suite of projects, including freeway widening and the double tracking of the rail corridor in North County.
    Mayor Catherine Blakespear said that the city is arguing that the western alignment is more compatible with the already completed legs of the rail trail.

    “Our argument is that placing the bike path along Highway 101 will more successfully achieve the goals of the project than placing the bike path east of the railroad track,” Blakespear said in her recent newsletter. “The bike lanes to our north in Carlsbad and Solana Beach to the south run along Highway 101. We want to continue the path along the routes folks are already using, and not force them to detour inland.”

    There is much more in this article than the quotes I've pulled here. - OKB
    ===========

    From SANDAG Twitter Tweet



    • CommentAuthorfjl307
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2017
     
    Article from KPBS:
    http://www.kpbs.org/news/2017/may/04/activists-growing-impatient-san-diegos-bike-progra/

    Part of Grand Avenue has Sharrows. They work really well. Garnet could use them as well. I've ridden down that road through the main business district of PB several times and never had an issue taking the lane.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2017 edited
     
    fjl307:Part of Grand Avenue has Sharrows. They work really well.
    What do you mean by "work really well'"? As in "this is sufficient bike infrastructure to recommend and encourage all bicyclists to safely travel it"?

    As cyclists - especially amongst those who consider themselves "experienced" - it 's a common fallacy to let own opinions and experiences form the foundation for advocacy recommendations (and trust me, the City will listen to any suggestion of keeping things status quo - especially when coming from a cyclist): Instead, we need to always think about the roadway safety and well being of all citizens - including encouraging those who may want to ride, but don't because they view Grand Ave, Ingraham St and Mission Blvd, as local examples, as too intimidating.

    If you couldn't recommend your next-door neighbor to ride (mom with toddler in babyseat, dad with child on tag-along bike, 11-year old riding to school, college freshman riding home after a night on town, grandma on a grocery run) on any particular street, the infrastructure probably doesn't "work really well".
  5.  



    Councilman Alvarez rides the neighborhood, promises money for bikes
    From Park and G to Chicano Park to Harbor Drive
    By Dave Rice, May 6, 2017 sandiegoreader.com
    "When you're on a bike, it makes a world of difference to help understand what's happening in the community," said Alvarez, who told the group he commutes by bike two to three times a week.
    Alvarez told riders, "There is money coming in, not just to San Diego but other cities, to improve our streets and infrastructure overall. We want to make sure that those improvements to our streets include amenities for bicycling. The money is there."
  6.  
    Bike to Work Day: La Jolla cyclists talk biking around town
    María José Durán May 11, 2017 lajollalight.com
    “I was about to turn and all of a sudden the car just rear-ended me. I fell over, scratched my leg a little bit and bruised my knee. … I couldn’t see the license plate at all, and I’m not sure if they just sped off or U-turned, but they drove away without doing anything,” 11-year-old Charlotte Norton told La Jolla Light.

    Charlotte said that since her accident, she rides mostly on sidewalks, which she knows is wrong. “I don’t want to take the risk (of riding on the street) again,” she said.
    Charlotte is one of many cyclists who responded to a La Jolla Light call for testimony on the safety and convenience of navigating the 92037 ZIP code on a two-wheeler.

    All the cyclists who contacted the La Jolla Light for this report have one thing in common: They love riding their bikes in La Jolla. They said they enjoy the weather, the natural beauty, the exercise and not having to look for a parking space. La Jolla bikers have their grievances, but they want to make sure there’s a future for two-wheeled transportation town.


    Read More: LINK
  7.  
    Padres Pedal the Cause gives over $2M to cancer research
    March 1, 2017 ranchosantafereview.com
    On Feb. 16, Padres Pedal the Cause presented a check for $2,031,989 to researchers from Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and Rady Children’s Hospital–San Diego.

    Most importantly, 2016 marked the achievement of the 100 percent model, which means that all money raised by the riders through fundraising was donated to cancer research. All expenses were underwritten through the generous support of corporate sponsors, including the Koman Family Foundation, BD, Sempra Energy, Wells Fargo and Qualcomm among many others.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 12th 2017
     
  8.  
    Coastal Commission reverses city on long-debated Cardiff rail trail
    Phil Diehl May 11, 2017 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Encinitas’ plan to build the Cardiff section of the Coastal Rail Trail to the west of the city’s railroad tracks was rejected this week by the California Coastal Commission, another twist in a long-running debate over the project.
    In a meeting Thursday in San Diego, the commission said the 1.3-mile trail along Coast Highway 101 should go east of the tracks along San Elijo Avenue from Chesterfield Drive north to Santa Fe Drive
    That leaves the city without approval it needs for either route and the direction ahead unclear, officials said.
    Commissioner Greg Cox, a San Diego County supervisor, made a motion to support the western plan, saying it was “a more logical solution,” but his motion failed, and then the commission voted to support the route along San Elijo Avenue.
    “SANDAG has the money, plus a $1 million grant from Caltrans,” Encinitas Mayor Catherine Blakespear said. “It could begin in less than a year and be in use by the public in 2019. None of that can be said for the east-side alignment.”
    The eastern route would cost an additional $4 million for drainage improvements, retaining walls and bluff stabilization work, Blakespear said. It would develop an area of natural lands and wildlife that the city wants to preserve.
    SANDAG officials also were disappointed by the commission’s decision, Charles “Muggs” Stoll, director of land use and planning for the agency, said Friday.
    “We feel like the western alignment was superior to any along the eastern side,” Stoll said. “It would have provided a great facility for both the community and the region.”
    Much more work needs to be done to build the facility along San Elijo Avenue, he said, and that will cost more money and take more time. Also, the agency will have to forfeit its $1 million grant because it will miss the construction deadline.


    Coastal Commission to Encinitas — No!

    Bike trail must go east of the tracks
    Ken Harrison, May 16, 2017 sandiegoreader.com
    Despite unanimous city council support for a proposed bike lane and rail trail project along the westside of Cardiff by the Sea’s section of Coast Highway 101 and railroad tracks, the Coastal Commission voted against the community, 12 - 0.

    “I’m tremendously disappointed,” Mayor Catherine Blakespear told me. “We’ve spent much time and energy on this. It was unanimous with the council, we had community consensus, and the improvements would have been good for the city.”

    “The city is now unable to control the project” said Blakespear. “The Coastal Commission is the final decision maker. There isn’t a higher body to take our case to. We now have to adapt, doing the best we can with the realities in front of us.”

    The 1.3 miles of bike lanes and trails between Chesterfield Drive and D Street, the project in question, will now have to switch to the east side of the tracks. A railroad pedestrian crossing in Cardiff will need to be built at either Verdi Avenue or Montgomery Avenue. “We can’t keep people from getting to the beach, “ said Blakespear.
  9.  

    Douglas Alden commutes to work along Camino Del Mar on Wednesday morning in Del Mar, California. Del Mar has a buffer lane to separate traffic and cyclists.
    (Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)

    Event encourages people to bike to work
    San Diego Union-Tribune
    It’s time to snap on your helmet and roll through the city during Bike to Work Day on May 18.

    Whether your commute is 5 or 50 minutes, there will be 100 pit stops through San Diego County to help encourage you along the way. The stops, which will be open from 6-9 a.m., will provide fun breaks for both new and experienced bicyclists. Plus, if you register for the event, you’ll receive a free t-shirt and snacks.
  10.  
    Wanted: your questions on transportation and the environment
    Joshua Emerson Smith May 16, 2017 sandiegouniontribune.com
    The San Diego Union-Tribune would like to hear from you, our readers. What do you want to know about transportation and how it impacts the environment, such as air we breathe? Send us thoughtful questions, big or small, and get you answers.

    Send your questions along with your full name and neighborhood of residence to carwars@sduniontribune.com.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2017 edited
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:http://o3pv83dy2y42obv652bzmcc2.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2504158_sd_no_bike_commute_EC_363.jpg
    Douglas Alden commutes to work along Camino Del Mar on Wednesday morning in Del Mar, California. Del Mar has a buffer lane to separate traffic and cyclists.
    (Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)

    Event encourages people to bike to work
    San Diego Union-Tribune
    It’s time to snap on your helmet and roll through the city during Bike to Work Day on May 18.

    Whether your commute is 5 or 50 minutes, there will be 100 pit stops through San Diego County to help encourage you along the way. The stops, which will be open from 6-9 a.m., will provide fun breaks for both new and experienced bicyclists. Plus, if you register for the event, you’ll receive a free t-shirt and snacks.



    Bike to Work Day, or as Douglas and I call it, "our normal commute". But it'll be nice to see even more riders than usual and the last couple of times I actually did see some new regular faces afterwards.

    Come out and ride, no excuses!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2017
     
    I don't normally ride to work since my office is in my home (for now), but I typically ride at lunch or late afternoon.

    But since today was bike to work day, I figured I'd ride from Carlsbad to Encinitas, pick up swag, and have breakfast at Honeys.

    Now I did ride to this area from 2010 to 2013. When I did it this AM I was shocked at how bad the auto traffic was. Backed up on the coast highway from almost La Costa to Leucadia Blvd.

    I can't believe people just repeat this every day.

    So much better on the bike.
  11.  

    Davis became the first city to reduce bike fines after finding that officers were slow to ticket bicyclists due to public anger over the steep costs.
    (Image by BicycleLeague.org)

    Coronado to reduce bike fines, give more tickets
    Right now running a red costs nearly $500
    By Sheila Pell, May 22, 2017
    Currently, failure to stop at a red light, say, can — counting bail and other court fees along with the base amount — result in a fine as high as $490, a staff report notes. But state vehicle code allows cities to set more reasonable fees for minor bike violations; an option not available to cars.
    San Diego Bike Coalition executive director, Andy Hanshaw, says Coronado's efforts, “align with other bike-friendly communities across the country.” The group agrees with the lowering of fines proposed for bicyclists. “We encourage other cities throughout San Diego County to do the same."
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    I encourage them to ticket the huge number of automobile drivers texting, facebook-ing and whatever-ing on their mobile phones as they drive.

    That would be special.
    • CommentAuthorsd_mike
    • CommentTime3 days ago edited
     
    I'd like to see cyclists and motorists alike ticketed for running stop signs on Howard Ave in North Park. Mostly cyclists as they rarely even slow, let alone stop. We can blame "those damn cagers" or simply admit that cyclists are also to blame and tend to set a poor example themselves.

    I stop at stop signs and red lights. It doesn't delay me much at all.