Not signed in (Sign In)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2017
     
    batmick:There are several schools near that intersection and the crosswalk is used by many children all day. Yet road design is such that Encinitas Boulevard is essentially a freeway up and over the hill in both directions. Inexcusable, yet this was, as they say, an accident waiting to happen.


    I lived off Balour from 2003 to 2008, in the "mini barrio" section. Lots of children crossing there because of the school. The speed limit on Encinitas Blvd. is another example of the bad effects of the "Speed Rule."

    FYI: Making the left from Encinitas Blvd. going East onto Cantebria (just past Balour) on the bicycle is always an 'interesting' situation.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2017
     
    I didn't know what else to do, so I sent an email to the mayor of Encinitas asking her to make sure this case gets proper attention, and to let it be motivation for improving street safety in the city.
  1.  
    bikingbill:
    Shady John:http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Pedestrian-Dies-After-Being-Hit-by-Car-Encinitas-Boulevard-Balour-Drive-444885853.html

    This sounds like manslaughter, at least. If you're driving, and a car in front of you stops at a crosswalk, do you really think it is OK to swerve around the car and go through the crosswalk? No way in hell should this driver be allowed to go without prison time (assuming the initial report is accurate).

    Forecast says: Major disappointment followed by anticipated anger and sadness.
    MAP
    Satellite View
    Street View

    To be fair, the story doesn't state whether she had the walk signal, whether the vehicles had right of way or even which street she was crossing (Encinitas Boulevard is implied but not certain). This could be one of those cases where the vehicles had the green and someone stopped "as a courtesy" and the tragedy occurred. Encinitas Boulevard has two lanes in each direction and maybe the car going around was in fact just changing lanes and never saw the pedestrian.

    I just about had a nervous brake down in front of my apartment when I saw a well meaning woman encourage by waving, two young boys walking their bikes, to continue from the median to the near side of my street (Grand Ave in PB). Two lanes in both directions, the woman driving a large Ryder Truck and an impatient taxi driver behind punching it around the stopped truck. The kids could't see through the truck and neither could the taxi driver, so one couldn't see the others. I was standing in the driveway and saw the whole thing unfold right in front of me. I saw my life flash in front of my eyes, their lives flash in front of my eyes, the taxi driver's expression of horror as he saw the kids emerging from in front of the truck… I didn't have time to react until after it ended as a near miss. I freaked at the taxi driver who had squealed to a stop, the woman in the truck who waved the kids to potential doom and the kids themselves. I really melted down and could only slink back into my dwelling, muttering to myself, afterwards. I hate when that happens.
    ==============================

    A past story from my lovely neighborhood:
    Police Recover Car in Pacific Beach Hit-and-Run
    By Samantha Tatro and Monica Garske September 12, 2016 nbcsandiego.com
    The hit-and-run happened on Aug. 5, 2016 at 1:00 a.m. in the 900 block of Garnet Avenue. A silver sedan heading east on Garnet at Cass swerved around a stopped car, into oncoming traffic, plowing into Erby and his friend, police said. The silver sedan never stopped.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2017
     
    OKB, I can sympathize with your cringe, I've seen situations like that develop as well, though not as dramatic as the one you described. I don't like it when a motorist tries to wave me through when I'm a pedestrian or on a bike. No, I won't go on your schedule, I'll go when I see the situation is right. I've frustrated many drivers by shaking off their waves, because to follow would put me in a compromised position.

    Regarding your analysis of the fatal crossing in Encinitas: As I read the headline, it states that she was in the crosswalk on Encinitas Blvd. Yes, to be fair, the woman might have been crossing against the light, although that is not stated. Still, a careful driver would see the situation in front of her, and slow down to see why the car in front of her had slowed down, instead of just swerving around. Also, this is right in front of the Encinitas Senior Center, so assuming the driver was familiar with the area, she should have been aware that there could be slow-moving pedestrians there.

    Driving is a privilege, not a right. We need a license to drive, and presumably that license should be given out only after the applicant has demonstrated that she/he can drive responsibility. We shouldn't settle for a chimpanzee-level of driving judgment.

    I am absolutely ready for self-driving cars. I don't want Alexa or a smart refrigerator, because I don't want/need that level of intrusiveness in my life. But humans (at least Americans) are so bad at driving that the bar is very low for how well self-driving cars have to perform. After a certain amount of time, I hope the liability risk for manual driving becomes much greater, to the point that even the holdouts won't/can't drive manually. It will demand a great psychological change, and will require ceding a lot of freedom, but the carnage is simply too bad now.
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2017
     
    From what I have read on another forum, the pedestrian was crossing Encinitas legally with the Light. The first car was turning right from Balour onto Encinitas and made the proper stop. Second car also turning right onto Encinitas came around the left hand side of the first car and nailed the pedestrian.
  2.  
  3.  
    BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH
    BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH
    BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BlAH ......

    ================================================================
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2017 edited
     
    bossvoss:From what I have read on another forum, the pedestrian was crossing Encinitas legally with the Light. The first car was turning right from Balour onto Encinitas and made the proper stop. Second car also turning right onto Encinitas came around the left hand side of the first car and nailed the pedestrian.


    I think that's vehicular homicide. It can result in 1 year in jail or up to six years in prison, if due to "gross negligence." I believe this is a case of "gross negligence."

    https://www.shouselaw.com/vehicle-manslaughter.html
  4.  


    City asked to help get kids safely to school
    Bianca Kaplanek September 21 2017 thecoastnews.com
    SOLANA BEACH — The elimination of crossing guards at two dangerous intersections on Lomas Santa Fe Drive prompted several parents and students to ask City Council to intervene.

    At the Sept. 12 meeting, more than a dozen youngsters, mostly from Skyline Elementary, said because of dangerous traffic at the Interstate 5 ramps they are no longer able to walk, bike or scooter to and from school.

    “I would like to see more adult supervision along the route to my school each day, specifically by the freeway entrances and exits,” fifth-grader Ellie Koff said. “I really enjoy walking and biking because it makes me feel responsible.”

    “Adults are constantly telling us to be environmentally friendly by walking and biking instead of riding in a car,” Ellie added. “There is a huge group of us that are willing to do that if we can have some help from supervisors.”
    “(A)ll the cars are going very fast and it can be really nerve-wracking just to walk to and from school,” she added. “I don’t want to see any of my friends or family affected by any accidents that could happen.”
    “Students should not walk or ride because it’s unsafe should not be an acceptable solution to any of us,” Catherine Gilbert said. “As a community we have a responsibility to our children to promote independence, healthy choices and environmental stewardship, all of which are promoted by students walking and riding to school.

    “I understand the school district wanting to keep their employees safe,” Shawna McGarry said. “But I do believe it’s imperative that we come together as a city to re-provide the crossing guards … so that we can keep these kids walking and biking to school.


    There's a lot more in this story….

    EDIT: See related post in Infrastructure thread ~ October 13th 2017
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2017
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:http://www.thecoastnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/DSC_0052.jpg

    City asked to help get kids safely to school
    Bianca Kaplanek September 21 2017 thecoastnews.com
    SOLANA BEACH — The elimination of crossing guards at two dangerous intersections on Lomas Santa Fe Drive prompted several parents and students to ask City Council to intervene.

    At the Sept. 12 meeting, more than a dozen youngsters, mostly from Skyline Elementary, said because of dangerous traffic at the Interstate 5 ramps they are no longer able to walk, bike or scooter to and from school.

    “I would like to see more adult supervision along the route to my school each day, specifically by the freeway entrances and exits,” fifth-grader Ellie Koff said. “I really enjoy walking and biking because it makes me feel responsible.”

    “Adults are constantly telling us to be environmentally friendly by walking and biking instead of riding in a car,” Ellie added. “There is a huge group of us that are willing to do that if we can have some help from supervisors.”
    “(A)ll the cars are going very fast and it can be really nerve-wracking just to walk to and from school,” she added. “I don’t want to see any of my friends or family affected by any accidents that could happen.”
    “Students should not walk or ride because it’s unsafe should not be an acceptable solution to any of us,” Catherine Gilbert said. “As a community we have a responsibility to our children to promote independence, healthy choices and environmental stewardship, all of which are promoted by students walking and riding to school.

    “I understand the school district wanting to keep their employees safe,” Shawna McGarry said. “But I do believe it’s imperative that we come together as a city to re-provide the crossing guards … so that we can keep these kids walking and biking to school.


    There's a lot more in this story….


    The school's solution will probably be to ban walking or cycling to school. It's happened before:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-volk/cycling-or-walking-to-sch_b_305429.html

    Why isn't there a crossing SIGNAL at that ramp? Also the bike lane is an invitation for a right cross.
  5.  
    Woman injured in Encinitas hit-and-run fighting for her life as search for driver continues
    Debbi Baker September 27, 2017 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Ashley Mullins Lane, who lives in Oceanside with her two young daughters, was hit Friday just before 7:30 p.m. as she was crossing Encinitas Boulevard near South Coast Highway 101.

    She had just finished working at her job at Lazy Acres market and was heading to the Coaster station to go home, said her father Roger Mullins of Encinitas.

    After hitting her, the driver of the truck — described as a newer, white Ford 150 Platinum Edition with a shiny silver tailgate — stopped, got out and surveyed the scene before telling witnesses that she appeared to be OK, said sheriff’s Sgt. Luis Chavez. The driver, said to be white and in his 40s, then got back into the truck and drove off.

    Mullins Lane suffered several broken bones, including her pelvis, ribs and four vertebrae, as well as a lacerated spleen. She is also having neurological issues that have left her entire left side paralyzed and she suffered a stroke, her father said.

    Anyone with information is asked to call the Encinitas sheriff’s station at (760) 966-3500 or call Crime Stoppers at (888)580-8477.
    There are no bikes in this story. I only posted it as an indication of the issues facing alternative transportation users. This woman was walking from her job to the Coaster Station; going home to her children. Bike commuters, transit commuters and pedestrians share common cause in needing safe, functional facilities in our urban environment. Robust crosswalks, pedestrian signals, functional intersections and the like, must provide protections from the growing onslaught of vehicle traffic.
  6.  
    ^^
    Encinitas Man Accused of Driving Away After Striking Woman Near Moonlight Beach
    Debbie L. Sklar October 6, 2017 timesofsandiego.com
    Justin Walt Parker, 38, turned himself in Thursday evening in connection with the Sept. 22 crash, which left 33-year-old Ashley Lane with a concussion and broken bones and caused her to suffer three strokes, according to sheriff’s officials.

    With “overwhelming help” from the public, deputies were able to identify Parker as the suspected hit-and-run motorist, Maryon said.

    Investigators tracked down Parker’s truck at a custom automotive shop in Riverside. By then, the damage it allegedly had sustained in the crash had been repaired, the captain said.

    Following his surrender to sheriff’s officials, Parker, an Encinitas resident, was booked into county jail. He soon posted bail of $250,000 and was released on his own recognizance at about 1 a.m.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2017
     
    Will we be disappointed? I hope not.
  7.  
    San Diego City Employees Lead On Public Transit, Lag On Bikes
    Andrew Bowen October 9, 2017 kpbs.org
    "There's some pretty simple and easy things the city can do to make biking more attractive for their employees, like bike cages and showers at the office," Rosas said. "But really the biggest impact that they're going to have is by implementing safe bike infrastructure, including the downtown mobility plan."

    City Council members passed the downtown mobility plan last year. It calls for nine miles of new bike lanes downtown — many of them separated from cars with physical barriers. Mayor Kevin Faulconer has pledged to implement those bike lanes by the summer of 2019.
  8.  
    Uptown Planners prioritize 5 community projects
    October 6th, 2017 sduptownnews.com
    The construction of Olive Street Park in Bankers Hill is the top priority for the Uptown Planners, the citizen-elected volunteer board that advises city planners on matters related to growth and development in the Uptown district.
    • No. 2 — Normal Street Linear Park, a redesign of Normal Street from University Avenue to Lincoln Street.
    • No. 3 — University Avenue “Vision Zero” pedestrian improvements, including midblock pedestrian crossings on several wide blocks in eastern Hillcrest between Richmond and Normal streets.
    • No. 4 — Washington Street pedestrian and bikeway improvements through University Heights.
    • No. 5 — Grant Elementary K-8 Joint-Use Park in Mission Hills.
    More DecoBike locations

    When Erikat insisted that an average of six daily DecoBike users in Uptown was considered a good figure, people scoffed at him. Leo Wilson, the Uptown Planners chair who is himself a bicyclist, sternly told Erikat that “you don’t take away valuable parking spaces in Uptown” to locate bike-sharing stations.

    Gerrie Trussell, executive director of the Uptown Community Parking District (UCPD), echoed those feelings. The 14 new bike-sharing stations will eliminate 10 parking spots throughout the Uptown district, and Erikat noted that MTS was the agency which had recommended all those locations that would require eliminating parking spots.

    Amie Hayes, a member of the Uptown Planners who is also involved with Save Our Heritage Organisation and is president of the Bankers Hill Community Group, blasted DecoBike for wanting to place bike-sharing stations along Sixth Avenue on the swale between the roadway and the sidewalk. Erikat said the stations would have advertising panels, and Hayes warned him that ads are banned in Balboa Park. He contended that the swale is not “technically” part of Balboa Park, which drew a public rebuke from Hayes. Stay tuned on this matter.
    Trussell, from the UCPD, told the Uptown Planners that her agency is planning wayfinding signage for International Restaurant Row in Mission Hills and various sites in Hillcrest. She said Mission Hills decided not to participate in the project.
  9.  
    Guest Editorial: Uptown Community Parking District budget sabotaged?
    Ben Baltic and Jim Frost - October 6th, 2017 - sduptownnews.com
    The motion was presented to the board simply as a set of talking points to use while interacting with the public. Now, Nichols is portraying the motion to say that the parking district is prevented from funding or supporting any current or future project anywhere in Uptown if a single parking space is removed.

    Previously, the Bankers Hill Neighborhood Parking Committee, a subcommittee of the UCPD, supported — and continues to support —the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) bike project on Fourth and Fifth avenues between Downtown and Hillcrest. Bankers Hill included significant funds in this year’s budget for upgrades in the Bankers Hill portion of the project. This project causes a small parking loss in Hillcrest but overall the project provides parking gains for Uptown.
    Representing the HBA, Nichols continued to lobby the city. Nichols contended that because of the UCPD motion, the city could not allow Bankers Hill funding for the SANDAG bike project in the current budget. Given that the proposed parking district budget had been unanimously approved by the UCPD board, including Nichols, Nichols was in effect arguing against the interests of the parking district he chairs, his own vote, and for the interests of the HBA that employs him. Was this not a clear and obvious conflict of interest?

    Had Nichols succeeded, the money Bankers Hill allocated for landscaping, lighting and other improvements would have been stripped from the UCPD budget. This would not have changed the parking loss in Hillcrest in any way. What it would have done is block funding for many long overdue improvements associated with the bike project to the Bankers Hill business core, which directly competes with Hillcrest. Whose agenda was Nichols really interested in? The Uptown community and parking district? Or the Hillcrest Business Association? Because of these actions by Nichols, the city has asked the UCPD to clarify its position.
    Working closely with neighborhood businesses, residents, SANDAG and the city, Bankers Hill has chosen to use some of its money to upgrade and provide enhancements to the bike project. Should Hillcrest not wish to allocate money to the bike project in that neighborhood, it is not obliged to do so. The long-standing policy of neighborhood autonomy should be respected.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2017
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:^^
    Encinitas Man Accused of Driving Away After Striking Woman Near Moonlight Beach
    Debbie L. Sklar October 6, 2017 timesofsandiego.com
    Justin Walt Parker, 38, turned himself in Thursday evening in connection with the Sept. 22 crash, which left 33-year-old Ashley Lane with a concussion and broken bones and caused her to suffer three strokes, according to sheriff’s officials.

    With “overwhelming help” from the public, deputies were able to identify Parker as the suspected hit-and-run motorist, Maryon said.

    Investigators tracked down Parker’s truck at a custom automotive shop in Riverside. By then, the damage it allegedly had sustained in the crash had been repaired, the captain said.

    Following his surrender to sheriff’s officials, Parker, an Encinitas resident, was booked into county jail. He soon posted bail of $250,000 and was released on his own recognizance at about 1 a.m.


    http://www.cbs8.com/story/36586400/woman-badly-injured-accused-hit-and-run-driver-faces-judge
  10.  
    I read somewhere that at most, he's looking at 4 years and a fine. Of course there's the civil ramifications. A real tragedy.
  11.  

    Cyclists and pedestrians on the Champs- Élysées during the city's "day without cars" on Oct. 1, 2016
    Photo by Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

    Paris Mayor Plans To Eliminate All Non-Electric Cars By 2030
    Laurel Wamsley (NPR) October 12, 2017 kpbs.org
    Mayor Anne Hidalgo's call on Thursday for an end to petrol-fueled cars on Paris roads by 2030 follows a previously announced plan to eliminate diesel cars from the city by 2024, when Paris will host the Summer Olympics.

    "We are seeing a revolution in terms of mobility and on the issue of climate," Christophe Nadjovski, Paris deputy mayor in charge of transport and public space, told France Info Radio on Tuesday. "We can't wait."
    "No measure of prohibition or sanction is included" in the new climate plan for Paris, the mayor's office said in the statement. "In order to achieve the goal of an end to the thermal engines in 2030, the City has decided to invest in the development of alternatives and in the reinforcement of financial aids that allow individuals and professionals to buy clean vehicles."

    The climate plan will be submitted to the Council of Paris for a vote in November.

    It also touted its investments in public transit and bike lanes. Authorities say that more than 60 percent of Parisians don't own a car.

    On Oct. 1, the city held "a day without cars," with the intention of making Paris "less polluted, more pleasant and more peaceful." Nitrogen dioxide levels dropped 25 percent, and noise levels dropped an average of 20 percent. On the Champs-Élysées, noise levels dropped 54 percent.

    === Related Story ====



    12 major cities that are starting to go car-free
    Leanna Garfield February 2, 2017 businessinsider.com
    Oslo plans to permanently ban all cars from its city center by 2019 — six years before Norway's country-wide ban would go into effect.

    The Norwegian capital will invest heavily in public transportation and replace 35 miles of roads previously dominated by cars with bike lanes.


    Oslo: The Journey to Car-free
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2017
     
    This needs to be applied to all hit-and-run cases that lead to death.

    Killer drivers to receive life sentences in law change
    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-41627240
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2017 edited
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:12 major cities that are starting to go car-free
    Leanna Garfield February 2, 2017 businessinsider.com: Oslo plans to permanently ban all cars from its city center by 2019 — six years before Norway's country-wide ban would go into effect. The Norwegian capital will invest heavily in public transportation and replace 35 miles of roads previously dominated by cars with bike lanes.
    This is what can happen when a government has a progressive vision and is given the powers to execute it, rather than endlessly giving in to whatever special interest and self-serving groups are the loudest - ref., as an example, the University Ave through Hillcrest fiasco.
  12.  

    An average UberEATS bike courier bikes 60 miles per week and the average bike delivery time is 13.28 minutes.

    UberEATS begins bike courier deliveries in Pacific and Mission beaches
    Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard October 16, 2017 sdnews.com
    UberEATS has launched its new bicycle courier service in San Diego. This works like the normal UberEATS service, the food will just be delivered by an Uber driver on bicycle.

    The bicycle courier service was launched in line with Uber's environmental commitment and will help reduce congestion in high traffic neighborhoods while ensuring food delivery is fast and efficient. The neighborhoods where the service is offered are downtown, Pacific Beach, Mission Beach, and Hillcrest.
    “It is a win for both the drivers, because they don’t need to spent time finding a parking spot, and also for the customers, because the food stays hot or cold,” said Winter.

    The new service aims to provide greater convenience for delivery partners, especially in congested parts of the city where parking may be difficult to find. It is also aligned and consistent with Mayor Kevin Faulconer's vision to encourage greater use of cycling throughout the city as part of San Diego's Master Bicycle Plan.

    “It is cool that you can do it on a bike because traffic in San Diego is pretty junk,” said Ryan Alvarado, who is an UberEATS bike courier. Alvarado has been pedaling food for six weeks delivering downtown.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2017
     
    This was Thursday Oct 12, around 5:50 pm. I rode by about 10 minutes afterwards, while the cars were backed up on LJ Shores and the emergency vehicles were arriving. I deliberately ducked into SIO rather than ride by on Shores because I didn't want to see what I knew would be a pedestrian or cyclist down.

    http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/sd-me-pedestrian-crash-20171012-story.html
    http://www.sdnews.com/view/full_story/27493105/article-Pedestrian-struck-by-car-on-La-Jolla-Shores-Drive?instance=bbp
  13.  

    Encinitas Community Park. Supporters of the project argued that the gate and path along Starlight Drive would provide children a safe and direct link between Ada Harris and Cardiff elementary schools through the park that bypassed any major streets. File photo

    City approves new park entrance
    Aaron Burgin October 20, 2017 thecoastnews.com
    MAP
    Supporters of the project argued that the gate and path would provide children a safe and direct link between Ada Harris and Cardiff elementary schools through the park that bypassed any major streets.

    “I think this project will profoundly improve biking and walking in this part of Cardiff,” Mayor Catherine Blakespear said. “There is a changing perspective about what it is we need to do to make our streets safer and more oriented toward biking and walking. For $66,000, it’s actually a bargain.”
    Roberta Walker, a Cardiff resident, said the council should look beyond the people in the room and consider single-parent families whose children have to walk to school alone at times.

    Leslie Tuchman, who has three children in Cardiff schools, said that kids and parents would walk if there were safer routes.

    “We would walk and bike much more frequently if we felt there was a safer route,” Tuchman said. “And I feel like this is a safer route.”
  14.  


    Planning Commission prefers smaller Watermark
    Bianca Kaplanek October 20, 2017 thecoastnews.com
    MAP
    DEL MAR — Asked by City Council to weigh in on Watermark Del Mar, the Planning Commission recommended moving forward with a scaled-down version of the multifamily complex proposed for the southeast comer of Jimmy Durante Boulevard and San Dieguito Drive.

    The other speakers, mostly residents of Heather Lane and neighborhoods off San Dieguito Drive, said the scaled-down version is still too big and will increase traffic and decrease safety at the already impacted and dangerous intersection with the newly installed roundabout.
    Commissioner Philip Posner said affordable housing shouldn’t be “the tail wagging the dog.”

    “I don’t feel that should be the driving factor about it,” he said, adding that he also has concerns about the roundabout, which he drives through daily, and emergency vehicles getting in and out when traffic backs up.
  15.  
    Impact of Giro di San Diego Bicycle race on Valley Center
    news desk October 23, 2017 valleycenter.com
    This week Valley Center Community Planning Group Chairman Oliver Smith sent a letter to the County criticizing the Dept. of Public Works, which controls special event permits, for not giving Valley Center’s public safety agencies enough warning to be able to plan for the Giro di San Diego bike race that occurred Sunday—and which caused a major traffic snarl. (See the full text of the letter in linked article.)
    Related Article
    Bicyclists will clog VC roads Sunday
    news desk October 19, 2017 valleycenter.com
    Article Comment: With many cycling events coming through our quaint “traffic challenged” community, please do an article on how these events are approved, by who(county dept.), what the positive impacts may be (if any), and to whom the fee’s flow to (follow the cash). It would make many of us feel better to understand these issues while sit in traffic and dodge “chase vans” and bicycle gangs on our precious weekends.
  16.  


    Georgia Street Bridge project lags behind
    Ken Williams October 20th, 2017 sduptownnews.com
    The Georgia Street Bridge project on University Avenue in North Park is running way behind schedule. MAP

    The historical bridge is undergoing a $14 million face-lift to restore the aging landmark to its original glory, and the rehabilitation project was originally envisioned to be finished by now.

    But motorists, pedestrians, bus riders and nearby neighbors continue to be inconvenienced by the construction, which has reduced traffic to one lane in each direction and caused noise and dust to plague that part of Uptown.

    The new target date for completion of the project is spring 2018.
    I can only imagine this is a real hassle for bicyclist and pedestrians wanting to use this gateway east and west on University Avenue. I can't tell from the images if temporary facilities are provided for them. With the coming winter months, low light and damp weather and roadways, this is a tough section to deal with.

    Hopefully when it is all said and done, the new facilities for bicyclist and pedestrians will be robust and safe.
  17.  
    It's a real PITA. I used to use Georgia St as a bypass to that intersection when traveling N/S through that corridor. Moving E/W is greatly strained too, as is mentioned as is all narrowed to 1 lane each direction. Motorists don't know how to act with a cyclist in the lane and it's occasionally fraught with some interesting interactions.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2017
     
    JayOtheMountains:It's a real PITA. I used to use Georgia St as a bypass to that intersection when traveling N/S through that corridor. Moving E/W is greatly strained too, as is mentioned as is all narrowed to 1 lane each direction. Motorists don't know how to act with a cyclist in the lane and it's occasionally fraught with some interesting interactions.


    Yeah, it's lame. You have to share a narrow lane on University (uphill) with a bunch of distracted and perturbed drivers. I've given up on it altogether and now go all the way around on Adams to the Vermont bridge.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2017 edited
     
    This is a bridge of great historical significance that Caltrans (true to form) wanted to demolish instead of fixing it up. I am happy to see that funds were found to rebuild it and the City decided to do it - in that context, delays are unimportant (and not unexpected).

    And yes - Adams to Vermont is much nicer, anyways.

  18.  

    Andy Hanshaw, executive director of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition, bikes downtown on Oct. 26, 2017. Photo by Christopher Maue

    ‘CiclosDias’ Open Streets Event Headed To Downtown San Diego
    Andrew Bowen October 27, 2017 kpbs.org
    Andy Hanshaw, executive director of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition, said CiclosDias encourages people to connect more with their community, and that people see things on the streets they would never notice while driving in a car.

    "The air is cleaner, the streets are quieter, but people are very active and busy," he said. "And you'll see a lot of fun activities on the street, too. We're working with all the business districts on the route to create experiences for people all along the route."
    City Council members Chris Ward and David Alvarez were due to speak at a press event promoting CiclosDias on Friday. Alvarez said the event would help the city reach its ambitious Climate Action Plan goal of tripling the share of bike commuters by 2020.

    "Events like CiclosDias help raise awareness of the need for people to get out of their cars and onto their bikes," he said in an emailed statement. "Only through continued activism and high profile public events like this will we be able to encourage more and more people to start using their bikes as a mode of transportation."

    San Diego County Bicycle Coalition was live Friday morning in Barrio Logan, encouraging citizens to join the fun on Sunday, October 29. 2017.
    Thank you Council members David Alvarez and Chris Ward, Barrio Logan MAD and many more for joining us this morning to get our communities excited for CicloSDias San Diego this Sunday from 10 am - 3 pm. There will be family-friendly fun for everyone along the route that stretches from Little Italy to Barrio Logan.
    ============== ============== ============== ==============


    CicloSDias in 2016. Courtesy San Diego Bike Coalition

    San Diego Weekend Guide: Oct. 27-29
    Chris Jennewein October 27, 2017 timesofsandiego.com
    Some of San Diego’s most interesting streets will be closed to cars and open for strolling and biking as CicloSDias comes to the city on Sunday.

    Streets in Little Italy, downtown, the Gaslamp Quarter, the East Village and Barrio Logan will all be closed to cars. Organizers expect thousands of people to explore the neighborhoods, with many following a three-mile route from Little Italy to Barrio Logan.

    The neighborhoods are home to hundreds of restaurants and stores to discover and explore. Participants can walk, ride, skate and scoot in a counterclockwise direction, seeing sights that would be missed from a fast-moving car.

    The event is sponsored by the San Diego Bike Coalition to introduce people to the idea of communities without cars.

    It’s scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday and is free.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    Great. Now a terrorist attack on cyclists and pedestrians in NYC. Eight killed, many more injured. Stand up against terror-keep riding your bike!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2017
     
    Shady John:Great. Now a terrorist attack on cyclists and pedestrians in NYC. Eight killed, many more injured. Stand up against terror-keep riding your bike!


    If one unsuccessful shoe bomber forced millions of air travelers to remove their shoes at security checks, maybe we should consider banning autos/trucks from city centers?

    Not as crazy of an idea as one thinks.

    We Should Ban Cars From Big Cities. Seriously.

    6,000 Americans were killed by cars while walking city streets last year. As terrorists embrace this deadly power, car-free cities make even more sense.

    In the coming days, politicians will try to convince you that what happened on the West Side Highway in Manhattan this week was an issue of terrorism, immigration, or religion. But just like the plague of mass shootings is a gun problem, the thousands of people killed by cars as they walk our streets every year is a car problem.

    A gun lobbyist would typically step in right about now to ask whether those who demand gun control after mass shootings also want to ban cars after events like this week. To which I say: Hell yes. Cars don’t belong on the streets of big cities, and we should do everything in our power to get rid of them.

    You can’t stop crazy. But you can reduce the number of people allowed to drive their 4,000 pound machines into city parks, along city beaches, past playgrounds, and alongside the sidewalks of the most pedestrian-packed places in the nation. If we banned cars from every city in the US tomorrow, we would stop vehicular terrorism overnight — and save thousands of lives.

    When a man shot and killed 58 people at a Las Vegas music festival last month, no one pointed to the lack of bulletproof vests worn by concertgoers, because the problem was clearly the stacks of weapons stockpiled in his hotel room.

    The truck that was used to kill eight people on Tuesday is no different, except unlike firearms, cars are still welcomed unconditionally in every city in the US. Gun ownership has its own constitutional guarantee — there's no equivalent for cars — but imagine if cities embraced guns the way they do vehicles: Free gun storage outside your apartment! A designated lane in the park for concealed carriers!

    More than 40,000 Americans were killed by cars in 2016 — the equivalent of a fully-loaded Boeing 747 falling out of the sky once every three days. It’s more than the 33,000 annual gun deaths, and more than the 20,000-plus people killed by synthetic opioids that year. Half of those automobile fatalities occurred in urban areas; about 6,000 of them were pedestrians.

    ....
  19.  
    ^^
    Check out this short StreetFilms

    What used to be an argument for less self induced congestion, noise, pollution and traffic has now taken on the mantel of a strategic defense of the citizens. This gives 'Vision Zero" a whole new meaning. I like this thinking on many levels.

    More Here:
    These Cities Are Building Downtowns Safe From Vehicle Attacks
    Laura Bliss November 2, 2017 citylab.com

    Sigurd:
    Old Knotty Buoy:12 major cities that are starting to go car-free
    Leanna Garfield February 2, 2017 businessinsider.com: Oslo plans to permanently ban all cars from its city center by 2019 — six years before Norway's country-wide ban would go into effect. The Norwegian capital will invest heavily in public transportation and replace 35 miles of roads previously dominated by cars with bike lanes.
    This is what can happen when a government has a progressive vision and is given the powers to execute it, rather than endlessly giving in to whatever special interest and self-serving groups are the loudest - ref., as an example, the University Ave through Hillcrest fiasco.



    Oslo: The Journey to Car-free
  20.  


    Curse of the Georgia Street Bridge
    Photographer can't stop shooting overdue rehab project — "I'm miserable."
    Julie Stalmer November 6th, 2017 sandiegoreader.com
    Restoration of the 103-year-old Georgia Street Bridge began in August 2016 with a completion date of about now. Anyone driving past the site can't help but notice it doesn't look anywhere close to being done.

    The arched bridge is no stranger to delays. The restoration slated to begin in 2015 was delayed due to funding issues. In the 1990s, the powers-that-be were toying with demolishing the bridge. Public outcry led to historic designation in 1994 — designation that didn't put the kibosh on talks of demolition by the city.

    Vidales pointed to the historic designation as the key to being able to qualify for $12 million in federal funding (total budget is $14 million).
    "I talked to the main guy," said May. "The fact that the traffic goes right through the middle of their construction site, it causes them a lot of trouble. It's in the way all the time. They have to work around that traffic….
    "The other thing that has made it take so long is the three arches inside the bridge. They had to save them to get federal funding. We aren't even going to see them when they're done. They'll be covered up with a new level of cement. I went there every night and filmed them cutting out little pieces to save those three arches. They should have just imploded the whole thing — that would have only taken a week. Instead it took weeks and weeks of work so they could say they were saving the bridge by saving those three arches. It's like the Coronado Bridge. They made it longer so they could get funding. It's the same kind of swindle."

    Some who have viewed May's photo documentation on social media have commented that it looks like a full demolition to them. May said the only thing left from the original bridge are those three arches.
  21.  
    Mayor touts city’s walkability
    Robert Moreno November 04 2017 thestarnews.com
    National City Mayor Ron Morrison said despite being the densest city in the county, National City has been able to improve its streets and sidewalks.

    “We’ve been recognized on a countywide basis of being the most walkable town and the most bike friendly town,” he said. “Twenty years ago, that was not on anyone’s radar screen.”

    Morrison added that in the last seven years, the city has installed seven miles of urban bike paths around National City’s portion of the Bayshore Bikeway.
  22.  


    Plan To Implement San Diego Bike Network Put On Hold
    Andrew Bowen November 10, 2017
    A scheduled San Diego City Council vote on a plan to speed up the creation of a citywide network of bike lanes was put on hold this week, after cycling advocates voiced concerns that the plan was not strong enough.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2017
     
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeNov 23rd 2017
     
  23.  
    Mission Valley gridlock: Failure is an option, says one group
    Roger Showley December 6, 2017 sandiegouniontribune.com
    With Mission Valley traffic heading for further development, a local planning and environmental group thinks failure to fend off gridlock may be an option to finding a permanent remedy.

    Planning consultant Steven Silverman told the San Diego Design + Environmental Council Wednesday that the right approach is to install additional transit and other measures before traffic worsens.

    “The other alternative, the (Gov.) Jerry Brown approach, is you let things reach a crisis, and only at that point when everyone feels screwed are the politicians and public willing to do something about it,” Silverman said. Plans anticipate tens of thousands of more daily vehicle trips generated by the housing and commercial development around a planned stadium for either SDSU football or professional soccer.
    “There’s now an accumulating monster,” Carpenter said, if transportation planners add up all the proposed projects for the valley, including the stadium site. Council members also said residents at higher-end housing and tenants in new commercial buildings do not generally use public transit to get around. This conclusion, they said, is the presence of the San Diego Trolley at the stadium will not convince many to give up their cars. Estrada said before the group recommends doing nothing and letting chaos force action in some future year, she will arrange a meeting with Mission Valley’s city councilman, Scott Sherman and transportation experts to discuss near-term options.

    Ha! You just can't make this stuff up.

    A meandering "River Bike Path", full of pedestrians, recreational runners and dog walkers, interrupted with road crossings, is not the "transportation solution" needed to encourage bicycle commuting. It seems more like a publicly financed amendment to the private development in the valley.

    A Class IV, protected cycle lane along the full length of Friars road is the most obvious, low cost, first step in building out alternative transportation solutions in Mission Valley. With coordinated spurs to the south side of the valley and links to the trolley stations, the convenience factor would encourage much more bicycle utilization as alternative transportation.
  24.  
    " you let things reach a crisis, and only at that point when everyone feels screwed are the politicians and public willing to do something about it"

    That seems to be life in America these days. But San Diego is at the tip of the spear here, certainly.
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:

    A meandering "River Bike Path", full of pedestrians, recreational runners and dog walkers, interrupted with road crossings, is not the "transportation solution" needed to encourage bicycle commuting. It seems more like a publicly financed amendment to the private development in the valley.

    A Class IV, protected cycle lane along the full length of Friars road is the most obvious, low cost, first step in building out alternative transportation solutions in Mission Valley. With coordinated spurs to the south side of the valley and links to the trolley stations, the convenience factor would encourage much more bicycle utilization as alternative transportation.


    The Hazard Center and Mission Valley sections of the SD River Trail are pretty craptacular. Disjointed concrete pavers make it terrible to bike on, and only having somewhat reasonable crossing options at Mission Center Rd. means that for most streets you have to either illegally cross the middle of the street or go long distances to a crosswalk.

    I also asked the lead designer at Caltrans regarding any other options regarding bike lanes for the Friars/163 intersection redesign and he mentioned they were non-starters. I do see some buffered lanes along Friars but I wouldn't want to ride on them regularly given traffic volumes and speeds. I can't imagine most cyclists will want to readily cross multiple two-lane turn pockets.

    I think the city needs to do a much better job of identifying and installing safer bike infrastructure on a system-wide level, not just downtown. I like what the intent is for the downtown core, but it just feels like they're putting in infra haphazardly outside of the Bayshore Bikeway and their downtown plan.
  25.  
    What, you don't like all of the striped bike lanes that suddenly end when you get to a block where the street narrows or parking comes back? Bike lanes to nowhere?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTime1 day ago edited
     
    allanorn:The Hazard Center and Mission Valley sections of the SD River Trail are pretty craptacular.
    I rode this trail once - on an SDCBC group ride led by its exec dir at the time - and it is completely useless for any commuting, even just local inside MV.

    Add to that a 50mph (!) speed limit on sections of Friars, and a shoulder that is little more than outside of a fog line, and you have evidence of a traffic engineering department that doesn't try or even care.
  26.  
    Shady John:" you let things reach a crisis, and only at that point when everyone feels screwed are the politicians and public willing to do something about it"

    A famous quote from the Vietnam War was a statement attributed to an unnamed U.S. officer by AP correspondent Peter Arnett in his writing about Bến Tre city on 7 February 1968:
    "'It became necessary to destroy the town to save it', a United States major said today."

    "It's deja vu all over again."
    ~ Yogi Berra
  27.  
    Reference Information: (Bike Advocacy -- Old Knotty Buoy Sep 2nd 2017)

    Cabrillo National Monument Change to Park Entrance Fees
    Cabrillo National Monument will increase the daily park entrance fee on January 1, 2018. The new rates for vehicles will be $15.00 per vehicle (good for everyone in the vehicle,) walk-ins/bicyclists $7.00 per person and motorcycles will be $10.00. Entrance fees are valid for seven days. The annual Cabrillo Park Pass will be $30.00. The NPS began collecting entrance fees at Cabrillo in 1987. This is only the second increase in 31 years.

    Cabrillo Pass: Valid for 12 months from purchase date. Admits the pass holder(s) and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle (14 passenger capacity or less) to Cabrillo National Monument. The pass is available at the Entrance Station.
    I called Cabrillo National Monument to get details on the new park entrance fees.
    • Walk-ins, bicyclists: daily park entrance fees are for individuals only. There is no sharing of a common receipt that might allow 4 bicyclists or walk-ins to enter under a single purchase (unlike the Cabrillo Park Pass). The entrance fees are valid for seven days for the one individual.
    • Cabrillo Park Pass: As in the past, the annual Cabrillo Park Pass allows the card holder and three other bicyclist to enter the park under the one pass. (Good only at Cabrillo National Monument).
    • America the Beautiful – National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Passes remain the same price for now.
    Visit the web site for more details.

    NOTES:
  28.  
    MTS Alerts and Detours

    MTS Bus Routes: 1, 10, 11, 120
    12/17/2017-12/19/2017 Paving - University Ave between 5th Ave & 9th Ave

    Due to paving, the following stops will be closed from 8:00PM - 6:00AM:
    (Eastbound)
    10098 - University Ave & 5th Ave (Rt. 10)
    13391 - University Ave & 8th Ave (Rt. 1, 11)
    10106 - University Ave & 10th Ave (Rt. 1)

    (Westbound)
    11254 - University Ave. & Vermont St (Rt. 10, 11)
    10852 - University Ave & 9th Ave (Rt. 1, 10, 11)
    10847 - University Ave & 7th Ave (Rt. 1,11)
    11245 - University Ave & 6th/5th Ave (Rt. 1, 10, 11,120)
    12027 - 4th Ave & University Ave (Rt. 1)

    This is good news. Newly painted bike lanes can't be far behind. Ho Ho Ho...