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  1.  

    City of Encinitas employees participate in Bike to Work Day on May 17. (Left to right): Lois Yum, Monica Attili, Catherine Blakespear, Mike Emerson, Nick Buck, Linda Theriault and Crystal Najera pose with their bikes in front of Encinitas City Hall.

    Powered by pedal on Bike to Work Day
    Carey Blakely May 18, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    Estimated participation rates were not yet available, but last year’s Bike to Work Day recorded more than 10,500 pit-stop visits countywide. Stephen Kelly, who works in sales for Revolution Bike Shop in Solana Beach, manned the store’s stop along Highway 101. He counted 101 riders who pulled up to the tent and 89 who kept on pedaling by. This is the fifth year that Revolution has hosted a pit stop for Bike to Work Day. He was surprised by how many riders commuted in the dark around 5 a.m. and was happy to find so many participants in a good mood.
    Encinitas Mayor Catherine Blakespear rode to City Hall, stopping to pick up her free T-shirt at the Nytro Multisport, Dudek and Clif Bar pit stop on Highway 101. She said, “I enjoyed seeing the enthusiasm of the people at City Hall who rode and those I passed on the street.”

    The League of American Bicyclists started Bike to Work Day in 1956 to promote public interest in biking in general and as an alternative way to commute. The league’s website ranks California as the third most bike-friendly state in the country.
  2.  


    Police Plan Citywide Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Operation Sunday

    Chris Jennewein May 27, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego Police officers on patrol Sunday will focus on the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists in areas of the city where the most collisions have occurred, authorities said Saturday. The operation will run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in identified trouble spots and in the downtown area where officers will crackdown on drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists and scooter riders who violate traffic laws, Officer Mark McCullogh said.

    “The department has mapped out locations over the past three years where pedestrian and bicycle involved collisions have occurred, along with the violations that led to those crashes,” McCullogh said. Officers will watch for drivers speeding, making illegal turns, failing to stop for signs and signals, failing to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and other violations, he said. They will also watch for pedestrians who cross the street illegally or fail to yield to drivers with the right of way.

    The San Diego Police Department has investigated thousands of fatal and injury crashes involving bicyclists and pedestrians over the past three years, McCullogh said.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2018
     
    Find a way of monitoring mobile phone use. Texting, Facebook etc. while driving.

    You could balance the city budget just by going after these violators.
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018
     
    New Mission Valley Bike Lanes "Causing Confusion"
    NBC 7

    The city added road markings for the new bike lane with the intention of making it safer for cyclists who want to reach the new State Route 15 Commuter Bikeway.

    The project connects more than two miles between Camino Del Rio South and Landis Street along SR-15.

    While the bike lane is marked, the city has not installed signs warning motorists to avoid parking in the area. So cars are lined up in the lane.

    This forces cyclists to weave around the parked cars, in and out of traffic. Some of the cars traveling along Camino Del Rio S. can whiz by at 50 mph.

    NBC 7 talked to the city of San Diego on Tuesday and it said city crews will install ‘no parking’ signs along the new bike lanes, which will mitigate the problem of parked cars along the bike path. The city did not give an exact date on when this would happen but estimated the ‘no parking’ signs should be up within a few weeks.

    Even though there are no signs up yet, San Diego Police are ticketing cars parked in the bike lane.


    The good news is that Camino Del Rio S now has bike lanes and it looks like the road may have been repaved. After riding this stretch a couple of times I was hoping this would be done.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018 edited
     
    As is evidenced by the video in that news article.

    1) Cars are traveling much too fast here and traffic calming measures are badly needed
    2) The "suicide" center lane needs to go to create more space for non-auto road users
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018
     
    Sigurd:As is evidenced by the video in that news article.

    1) Cars are traveling much too fast here and traffic calming measures are badly needed
    2) The "suicide" center lane needs to go to create more space for non-auto road users


    It would have been nice for folks to consider those improvements BEFORE opening a nearly-useless route from Adams to Camino Del Rio. Maybe they're trying to play catch up?
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018
     
    t.e.d:
    Sigurd:As is evidenced by the video in that news article.

    1) Cars are traveling much too fast here and traffic calming measures are badly needed
    2) The "suicide" center lane needs to go to create more space for non-auto road users


    It would have been nice for folks to consider those improvements BEFORE opening a nearly-useless route from Adams to Camino Del Rio. Maybe they're trying to play catch up?


    It's almost like the city and SANDAG don't talk to each other. I did hear in a BAC meeting months ago that the city was going to address Camino Del Rio but that was after the SR-15 bikeway opened. Now bike lanes need to be striped on Mission City Pkway, but that'll take an age if it ever gets done as Caltrans has to sign off on it (overpass across an Interstate).

    I'm fine with the left-turn center lane since that's a refuge for westbound cars turning left. I don't see a need for two car travel lanes going eastbound. The 45mph speed limit is also rather insane.
  3.  


    London cyclists too white, male and middle class, says capital's cycling chief in vow to tackle diversity 'problem'

    Tom Batchelor May 29, 2018 independent.co.uk
    Too few women and people from ethnic minority groups cycle in London and more must be done to promote diversity among a largely white, male and middle class biking community, the city’s walking and cycling commissioner has said. Speaking to The Independent, Mr Norman, whose job it is to deliver on Sadiq Khan’s pledge to make walking and cycling safer and easier in the capital, said: “There is a problem with cycling and the way it is perceived of getting middle-aged men cycling faster around the city, which is not the objective at all. He added: “Even when we have seen the growth in the number of cyclists, we haven’t seen that diversity."
    “There are a number of reasons for that. One is that safety is paramount for getting different people from different walks of life cycling: older people, younger people, those from different backgrounds.”
    The mayor’s office has unveiled a number of projects it says will begin to address a lack of diversity, including cycle training courses, grants for community groups who do not typically cycle and promoting electric bikes, as well as expanded cycle routes. On Quietway 1, a new route linking Waterloo with Greenwich, the proportion of women has risen from 29 per cent to 35 per cent.
    That prompted the London Cycling Campaign to call on Mr Norman and Mr Khan to “hurry up” fixing the most dangerous locations in London for cycling. Simon Munk, the group’s infrastructure campaigner, said only a network of safe, comfortable cycle routes would see cycling’s appeal broaden.

    “The mayor just needs to crack on with making sure that network is there and is high-quality,” he said. “Each new main road cycle track and safe-feeling quiet route brings loads more people to cycling as one of the most convenient, healthy and safe ways to get around.”
  4.  

    Brady and SJ with their load of donated bikes. (Courtesy image)

    Local boys donate 23 bikes to children in Haiti
    Karen Billing June 13, 2018 delmartimes.net
    Carmel Valley kids Brady Edwards and Stephenson Jean Michel “SJ” Dohrenwend recently led a bike drive for disadvantaged children in Haiti. The boys donated 23 bikes to San Diego nonprofit Friends and Family Community Connection and its bike drive in partnership with Gearing Up 4 Hope.

    The cause was especially close to SJ’s heart as he is originally from Haiti and was adopted and moved to the United States in 2010 at the age of 4. “It feels good to give back (to Haiti),” SJ said. “One of the biggest reasons why we are doing this is to give back.” The boys’ donated bikes joined for a total of 225 bikes that Friends and Family Connection loaded into a shipping container in May along with 300,000 meals and 120 donated bike helmets. The container is set to arrive in the city of Gressier, Haiti on June 21.
    When Brady and SJ found out about the effort to collect bikes there was only two weeks until the shopping container went out, but they were determined, setting a goal to reach 25 bikes. The boys understood how big of an impact their donation could make. “It takes a long time for kids to get to their school or jobs, like two or three miles,” Brady said. “The bikes are going to help them get there about three times as fast. We’re spoiled because we have cars.” One beneficiary of the bicycles is Shepherd's House School and Ministries in Haiti. Students who do well in school, have a perfect attendance record and keep the school clean by picking up trash, among other things, will allow students to qualify for a month with a bicycle.
    “We got some really good bikes,” SJ said. The boys spent time cleaning the bikes, pumping up tires and oiling chains. For those bikes that needed a little work, the boys did the repairs themselves.

    They hope to do a bike drive again next year, “We want to make another, higher goal,” Brady said.
  5.  
    LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS: Broken street to ‘Costa’ City $1.7M
    June 15, 2018 lajollalight.com
    The City has agreed to pay $1.7 million to a Segway renter who broke her hip driving over a broken section of Camino de la Costa by Winamar Avenue in July 2015.

    Regina Copabianco says she needs intense physical therapy and relies on a wheelchair. She filed suit in July 2016, after the City rejected a claim for damages that April. The City initially contended, in court filings, that Capobianco and her husband would have seen the damaged pavement if they exercised due care. In addition to medical expenses and to cover pain and suffering, Copabianco’s lawsuit sought compensation for lost wages, companionship and “consortium” (typically, a euphemism for sexual relations).

    Attorneys for the City also filed a cross complaint against We Love Tourists, the tour business that provided Capobianco with her Segway, arguing that it was should cover a percentage of the settlement. However, it didn’t because, according to a report in the San Diego Union-Tribune, it lacked liability insurance at the time of the accident and the company’s owner had limited assets.

    The City is not keeping its infrastructure up with the demands placed upon it by alternative forms of transportation, critics say.
  6.  
    I saw that article in the paper and my eyes popped out. The rental company lacked liability insurance?

    In light of lawsuits like this, what happens when a pedestrian or cyclist legally crossing the street or riding on the street is struck by a car? If the driver's insurance does not provide "complete" compensation for the injuries (which as we see can run into the millions of dollars), then wouldn't the city/county be liable for not maintaining safe infrastructure?
  7.  
    LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS
    Corey Levitan June 20, 2018 lajollalight.com
    The City’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget, which won unanimous City Council approval, funds the largest infrastructure investment in San Diego history while prioritizing funding for core neighborhood services — including public safety, the “Clean SD” initiative, homelessness, street repair, recreation centers and libraries. All this was accomplished with slowing revenue growth and rising City employee salaries.

    “We’re making another big down payment on San Diego’s future with a balanced budget that puts neighborhoods first,” said Mayor Kevin Faulconer, whose office drafted the initial version of the budget. “We’re maintaining the key services we’ve restored in recent years and making the largest infrastructure investment in City history.”

    The budget, covering July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019 — includes:
    • $559 million for the Capital Improvements Program (the most in City history)
    • $76 million to fix 390 miles of streets
    • $154 million for projects and programs related to the Climate Action Plan
    • $18 million for projects to support Vision Zero safety goals, including bike facilities, sidewalks, traffic signals, crosswalks and traffic calming measures
  8.  

    Solana Beach is the third city in San Diego County to receive the silver level League of American Bicyclists Bicycle Friendly Community Award. Chula Vista and the city of San Diego are bronze-level recipients. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

    City of Solana Beach awarded for bike friendliness
    Bianca Kaplanek June 21, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    SOLANA BEACH — In recognition of its efforts to promote nonmotorized, two-wheeled transportation, the city recently received the silver level League of American Bicyclists Bicycle Friendly Community Award. The honor “truly added us to an elite group of other communities across the nation,” City Manager Greg Wade said when he presented the award at the June 13 meeting to Councilman Dave Zito, who sought the designation three years ago.

    “Under the leadership of this City Council, the quality of life in Solana Beach is being enhanced through environmental sustainability and active transportation initiatives which have clearly demonstrated the city’s commitment to bicycle friendliness and complete street standards,” Wade said. “This recognizes our commitment to improving conditions for bicycling within the community and also the city’s investment in bicycling promotion, education programs, infrastructure and pro-bicycling policies,” he added.
    Since the creation of the Bicycle Friendly Community program in 1995, more than 1,500 community applications have been processed, resulting in 450 recognized communities. Within the county, Solana Beach joins Coronado and Oceanside in achieving silver level status. Chula Vista and San Diego hold bronze level awards.

    Wade said the program “emphasizes that bicycling can be a simple solution to some of the challenges we face as a community.” “Solana Beach and its residents know that bicycling is about mobility, sustainability, health and so much more,” he added. “Local community support and advocacy is also vital.

    “Solana Beach is fortunate to have a group like BikeWalkSolana to advocate on our behalf,” Wade said. “This award truly would not have been possible but for the efforts of BikeWalkSolana. They tirelessly give to the community and … particularly with this grant application … which was no small feat.” He said the process was “thorough and intensive and took quite a bit of effort.”
    In addition to recognizing BikeWalkSolana and Zito, Wade thanked members of the Public Works Department for their help. Zito said the award is a “reflection of the attitude that we have in the city of making sure it’s an active-transportation-friendly city.”
    Each year the league assesses all 50 states through a voluntary application process. Award status last four years. Silver is the third highest level. Recipients can upgrade to gold and platinum.

    To reach gold level, Solana Beach can continue to expand its bike network, upgrade existing facilities to increase protection and separation between modes and partner with neighboring jurisdictions on comprehensive plans for better regional connectivity. The city can also encourage local businesses, agencies and organizations to promote cycling to their employees and customers and seek recognition through the Bicycle Friendly Business program.

    Additionally, Solana Beach could work with law enforcement to ensure that enforcement activities are targeted at motorist infractions most likely to lead to crashes, injuries and fatalities among bicyclists.
  9.  
    Study shows most dangerous spots for bicyclists are Pacific Beach, downtown, Rosecrans Street, Escondido
    David Garrick June21, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Local bicyclists face the most risk of injury crashes in Pacific Beach, downtown San Diego, Rosecrans Street and parts of Oceanside and Escondido, an analysis of law enforcement collision data from 2010 through 2016 shows. Other dangerous areas include Coast Highway in Encinitas, Palm Avenue east of Imperial Beach, University Avenue in North Park, Loma Portal, Mission Beach, Coronado beach and West H Street in Chula Vista. Escondido’s crash hotspots are Washington Street at Broadway and Valley Parkway’s intersections with Midway Drive and Rose Street. In Oceanside, the most dangerous spots are Coast Highway at Eaton Street and Mission Avenue.

    The analysis is part of a project launched by local attorney Michael Bomberger aimed at helping bicyclists ride more safely by making them aware of dangerous areas. Another goal is pressuring the county government, San Diego and other cities to accelerate creation of more protected bike paths and more striped bike lanes on local streets, said Bomberger, whose law practice focuses on injured cyclists. The lack of cycling infrastructure across the county has become a more glaring problem in recent years as cities encourage more people to commute by bicycle to reduce traffic congestion and fight climate change.

    A webpage summarizing the analysis can be found here: ebcyclinglaw.com/san-diego-bicycle-crashes-study/
  10.  
    San Diego City Council Approves Bike Implementation Plan
    City News Service June 21, 2018 kpbs.org
    The San Diego City Council's Environment Committee Thursday unanimously approved a strategic implementation plan for the city's current Bicycle Master Plan, adopted in 2013. The master plan identifies pressing bike-related needs and includes bikeways, programs and other projects intended to improve and maintain the local bicycling environment over a 20-year span. The new plan, developed by the Bicycle Advisory Committee, identifies ways to activate provisions of the earlier document. It also proposes methods to measure success.
    The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035. A foremost priority will be initiating the master plan's "high priority bike projects," of which there are 40, estimated to cost $35 million.


    Cycling commuters. Photo courtesy of SANDAG

    San Diego Bicycle Plan Getting Real: Panel Eyes $312M Bike Network
    Ken Stone June 21, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    “San Diego has what it takes to become a city where bicycles are used for everyday transportation, recreation and general mobility,” said Councilman David Alvarez.

    Overall, building out the master plan’s proposed bike network is estimated to cost $312 million.
    • The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035.
    • The implementation plan’s second objective is to increase rider safety by bolstering enforcement and improving infrastructure in high-fatality areas. That fits into Vision Zero, a goal to eliminate local traffic deaths by 2025.
    • Objective three is to increase bike program funding and grant dollars, specifically for new bikeways and bike-oriented city staff.
    • Objective four is to increase education. Fourth-graders should receive bicycle education, the plan said; public awareness campaigns should be used; and a traffic diversion school should be created for cyclists and drivers cited for bike-related infractions.
    • Objective five emphasizes improving institutional collaboration on bicycle issues within the city and within outside agencies.
    • Finally, the last objective calls for evaluating program effectiveness by tracking bike mode share and reporting to the Bicycle Advisory Board on project implementation status.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:San Diego City Council Approves Bike Implementation Plan
    City News Service June 21, 2018 kpbs.org
    The San Diego City Council's Environment Committee Thursday unanimously approved a strategic implementation plan for the city's current Bicycle Master Plan, adopted in 2013. The master plan identifies pressing bike-related needs and includes bikeways, programs and other projects intended to improve and maintain the local bicycling environment over a 20-year span. The new plan, developed by the Bicycle Advisory Committee, identifies ways to activate provisions of the earlier document. It also proposes methods to measure success.
    The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035. A foremost priority will be initiating the master plan's "high priority bike projects," of which there are 40, estimated to cost $35 million.


    Whoaa!!! Is this for real???
    • CommentAuthorfrank
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    <blockquote><cite> Old Knotty Buoy:</cite><a href="http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/politics/sd-me-bike-hotspots-20180621-story.html" target="_blank">Study shows most dangerous spots for bicyclists are Pacific Beach, downtown, Rosecrans Street, Escondido</a> David Garrick June21, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com<blockquote>Local bicyclists face the most risk of injury crashes in Pacific Beach, downtown San Diego, Rosecrans Street and parts of Oceanside and Escondido, an analysis of law enforcement collision data from 2010 through 2016 shows. Other dangerous areas include Coast Highway in Encinitas, Palm Avenue east of Imperial Beach, University Avenue in North Park, Loma Portal, Mission Beach, Coronado beach and West H Street in Chula Vista. Escondido’s crash hotspots are Washington Street at Broadway and Valley Parkway’s intersections with Midway Drive and Rose Street. In Oceanside, the most dangerous spots are Coast Highway at Eaton Street and Mission Avenue. The analysis is part of a project launched by local attorney Michael Bomberger aimed at helping bicyclists ride more safely by making them aware of dangerous areas. Another goal is pressuring the county government, San Diego and other cities to accelerate creation of more protected bike paths and more striped bike lanes on local streets, said Bomberger, whose law practice focuses on injured cyclists. The lack of cycling infrastructure across the county has become a more glaring problem in recent years as cities encourage more people to commute by bicycle to reduce traffic congestion and fight climate change. A webpage summarizing the analysis can be found here: <a href=" https://www.ebcyclinglaw.com/san-diego-bicycle-crashes-study/" target="_blank">ebcyclinglaw.com/san-diego-bicycle-crashes-study/</a></blockquote> That study is heavily flawed. They only discuss intersections and not mid block crashes. It seems they’re considering crashes outside yet close to an intersection as being a crash associated with that intersection too. It’s clever to dig into SWITRS but a brief read of the SWITRS Coding Manual and even the CHP Collision Investigstion Manual would have helped them determine way more than just the approximate location of the crashes.
  11.  


    Escondido Shines group helps clean up bike path
    News Desk June 21, 2018 times-advocate.com
    Last Saturday, June 16, members of Escondido Shines gathered for the first ever Bike Path Clean-Up day. According to Melissa Navarrete of Escondido Shines, “We had about 15 people in attendance, made some great acquaintances and most important met other like-minded community members.” She added, “We picked up a lot of trash, raked up some of the dead leaves, and even painted over some graffiti!” A couple people who were walking the path even joined the group. One man commented on how he is high energy and was looking for something to keep himself busy. He grabbed some bags and worked on getting the path clean.

    “There were a couple small groups up to no good who left the path as we worked on our clean up efforts,” said Navarette. “Several cyclists thanked us as they rode the path. All in all, it was a wonderful way to spend our Saturday morning, not to mention, it was a perfectly overcast morning so we never got hot!” The group is still working on fundraising to buy a bike for “James,” a man who has helped a woman travel along the bike path safely by giving her an escort.