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  1.  

    City of Encinitas employees participate in Bike to Work Day on May 17. (Left to right): Lois Yum, Monica Attili, Catherine Blakespear, Mike Emerson, Nick Buck, Linda Theriault and Crystal Najera pose with their bikes in front of Encinitas City Hall.

    Powered by pedal on Bike to Work Day
    Carey Blakely May 18, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    Estimated participation rates were not yet available, but last year’s Bike to Work Day recorded more than 10,500 pit-stop visits countywide. Stephen Kelly, who works in sales for Revolution Bike Shop in Solana Beach, manned the store’s stop along Highway 101. He counted 101 riders who pulled up to the tent and 89 who kept on pedaling by. This is the fifth year that Revolution has hosted a pit stop for Bike to Work Day. He was surprised by how many riders commuted in the dark around 5 a.m. and was happy to find so many participants in a good mood.
    Encinitas Mayor Catherine Blakespear rode to City Hall, stopping to pick up her free T-shirt at the Nytro Multisport, Dudek and Clif Bar pit stop on Highway 101. She said, “I enjoyed seeing the enthusiasm of the people at City Hall who rode and those I passed on the street.”

    The League of American Bicyclists started Bike to Work Day in 1956 to promote public interest in biking in general and as an alternative way to commute. The league’s website ranks California as the third most bike-friendly state in the country.
  2.  


    Police Plan Citywide Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Operation Sunday

    Chris Jennewein May 27, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego Police officers on patrol Sunday will focus on the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists in areas of the city where the most collisions have occurred, authorities said Saturday. The operation will run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in identified trouble spots and in the downtown area where officers will crackdown on drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists and scooter riders who violate traffic laws, Officer Mark McCullogh said.

    “The department has mapped out locations over the past three years where pedestrian and bicycle involved collisions have occurred, along with the violations that led to those crashes,” McCullogh said. Officers will watch for drivers speeding, making illegal turns, failing to stop for signs and signals, failing to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and other violations, he said. They will also watch for pedestrians who cross the street illegally or fail to yield to drivers with the right of way.

    The San Diego Police Department has investigated thousands of fatal and injury crashes involving bicyclists and pedestrians over the past three years, McCullogh said.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2018
     
    Find a way of monitoring mobile phone use. Texting, Facebook etc. while driving.

    You could balance the city budget just by going after these violators.
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018
     
    New Mission Valley Bike Lanes "Causing Confusion"
    NBC 7

    The city added road markings for the new bike lane with the intention of making it safer for cyclists who want to reach the new State Route 15 Commuter Bikeway.

    The project connects more than two miles between Camino Del Rio South and Landis Street along SR-15.

    While the bike lane is marked, the city has not installed signs warning motorists to avoid parking in the area. So cars are lined up in the lane.

    This forces cyclists to weave around the parked cars, in and out of traffic. Some of the cars traveling along Camino Del Rio S. can whiz by at 50 mph.

    NBC 7 talked to the city of San Diego on Tuesday and it said city crews will install ‘no parking’ signs along the new bike lanes, which will mitigate the problem of parked cars along the bike path. The city did not give an exact date on when this would happen but estimated the ‘no parking’ signs should be up within a few weeks.

    Even though there are no signs up yet, San Diego Police are ticketing cars parked in the bike lane.


    The good news is that Camino Del Rio S now has bike lanes and it looks like the road may have been repaved. After riding this stretch a couple of times I was hoping this would be done.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018 edited
     
    As is evidenced by the video in that news article.

    1) Cars are traveling much too fast here and traffic calming measures are badly needed
    2) The "suicide" center lane needs to go to create more space for non-auto road users
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018
     
    Sigurd:As is evidenced by the video in that news article.

    1) Cars are traveling much too fast here and traffic calming measures are badly needed
    2) The "suicide" center lane needs to go to create more space for non-auto road users


    It would have been nice for folks to consider those improvements BEFORE opening a nearly-useless route from Adams to Camino Del Rio. Maybe they're trying to play catch up?
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2018
     
    t.e.d:
    Sigurd:As is evidenced by the video in that news article.

    1) Cars are traveling much too fast here and traffic calming measures are badly needed
    2) The "suicide" center lane needs to go to create more space for non-auto road users


    It would have been nice for folks to consider those improvements BEFORE opening a nearly-useless route from Adams to Camino Del Rio. Maybe they're trying to play catch up?


    It's almost like the city and SANDAG don't talk to each other. I did hear in a BAC meeting months ago that the city was going to address Camino Del Rio but that was after the SR-15 bikeway opened. Now bike lanes need to be striped on Mission City Pkway, but that'll take an age if it ever gets done as Caltrans has to sign off on it (overpass across an Interstate).

    I'm fine with the left-turn center lane since that's a refuge for westbound cars turning left. I don't see a need for two car travel lanes going eastbound. The 45mph speed limit is also rather insane.
  3.  


    London cyclists too white, male and middle class, says capital's cycling chief in vow to tackle diversity 'problem'

    Tom Batchelor May 29, 2018 independent.co.uk
    Too few women and people from ethnic minority groups cycle in London and more must be done to promote diversity among a largely white, male and middle class biking community, the city’s walking and cycling commissioner has said. Speaking to The Independent, Mr Norman, whose job it is to deliver on Sadiq Khan’s pledge to make walking and cycling safer and easier in the capital, said: “There is a problem with cycling and the way it is perceived of getting middle-aged men cycling faster around the city, which is not the objective at all. He added: “Even when we have seen the growth in the number of cyclists, we haven’t seen that diversity."
    “There are a number of reasons for that. One is that safety is paramount for getting different people from different walks of life cycling: older people, younger people, those from different backgrounds.”
    The mayor’s office has unveiled a number of projects it says will begin to address a lack of diversity, including cycle training courses, grants for community groups who do not typically cycle and promoting electric bikes, as well as expanded cycle routes. On Quietway 1, a new route linking Waterloo with Greenwich, the proportion of women has risen from 29 per cent to 35 per cent.
    That prompted the London Cycling Campaign to call on Mr Norman and Mr Khan to “hurry up” fixing the most dangerous locations in London for cycling. Simon Munk, the group’s infrastructure campaigner, said only a network of safe, comfortable cycle routes would see cycling’s appeal broaden.

    “The mayor just needs to crack on with making sure that network is there and is high-quality,” he said. “Each new main road cycle track and safe-feeling quiet route brings loads more people to cycling as one of the most convenient, healthy and safe ways to get around.”
  4.  

    Brady and SJ with their load of donated bikes. (Courtesy image)

    Local boys donate 23 bikes to children in Haiti
    Karen Billing June 13, 2018 delmartimes.net
    Carmel Valley kids Brady Edwards and Stephenson Jean Michel “SJ” Dohrenwend recently led a bike drive for disadvantaged children in Haiti. The boys donated 23 bikes to San Diego nonprofit Friends and Family Community Connection and its bike drive in partnership with Gearing Up 4 Hope.

    The cause was especially close to SJ’s heart as he is originally from Haiti and was adopted and moved to the United States in 2010 at the age of 4. “It feels good to give back (to Haiti),” SJ said. “One of the biggest reasons why we are doing this is to give back.” The boys’ donated bikes joined for a total of 225 bikes that Friends and Family Connection loaded into a shipping container in May along with 300,000 meals and 120 donated bike helmets. The container is set to arrive in the city of Gressier, Haiti on June 21.
    When Brady and SJ found out about the effort to collect bikes there was only two weeks until the shopping container went out, but they were determined, setting a goal to reach 25 bikes. The boys understood how big of an impact their donation could make. “It takes a long time for kids to get to their school or jobs, like two or three miles,” Brady said. “The bikes are going to help them get there about three times as fast. We’re spoiled because we have cars.” One beneficiary of the bicycles is Shepherd's House School and Ministries in Haiti. Students who do well in school, have a perfect attendance record and keep the school clean by picking up trash, among other things, will allow students to qualify for a month with a bicycle.
    “We got some really good bikes,” SJ said. The boys spent time cleaning the bikes, pumping up tires and oiling chains. For those bikes that needed a little work, the boys did the repairs themselves.

    They hope to do a bike drive again next year, “We want to make another, higher goal,” Brady said.
  5.  
    LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS: Broken street to ‘Costa’ City $1.7M
    June 15, 2018 lajollalight.com
    The City has agreed to pay $1.7 million to a Segway renter who broke her hip driving over a broken section of Camino de la Costa by Winamar Avenue in July 2015.

    Regina Copabianco says she needs intense physical therapy and relies on a wheelchair. She filed suit in July 2016, after the City rejected a claim for damages that April. The City initially contended, in court filings, that Capobianco and her husband would have seen the damaged pavement if they exercised due care. In addition to medical expenses and to cover pain and suffering, Copabianco’s lawsuit sought compensation for lost wages, companionship and “consortium” (typically, a euphemism for sexual relations).

    Attorneys for the City also filed a cross complaint against We Love Tourists, the tour business that provided Capobianco with her Segway, arguing that it was should cover a percentage of the settlement. However, it didn’t because, according to a report in the San Diego Union-Tribune, it lacked liability insurance at the time of the accident and the company’s owner had limited assets.

    The City is not keeping its infrastructure up with the demands placed upon it by alternative forms of transportation, critics say.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2018
     
    I saw that article in the paper and my eyes popped out. The rental company lacked liability insurance?

    In light of lawsuits like this, what happens when a pedestrian or cyclist legally crossing the street or riding on the street is struck by a car? If the driver's insurance does not provide "complete" compensation for the injuries (which as we see can run into the millions of dollars), then wouldn't the city/county be liable for not maintaining safe infrastructure?
  6.  
    LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS
    Corey Levitan June 20, 2018 lajollalight.com
    The City’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget, which won unanimous City Council approval, funds the largest infrastructure investment in San Diego history while prioritizing funding for core neighborhood services — including public safety, the “Clean SD” initiative, homelessness, street repair, recreation centers and libraries. All this was accomplished with slowing revenue growth and rising City employee salaries.

    “We’re making another big down payment on San Diego’s future with a balanced budget that puts neighborhoods first,” said Mayor Kevin Faulconer, whose office drafted the initial version of the budget. “We’re maintaining the key services we’ve restored in recent years and making the largest infrastructure investment in City history.”

    The budget, covering July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019 — includes:
    • $559 million for the Capital Improvements Program (the most in City history)
    • $76 million to fix 390 miles of streets
    • $154 million for projects and programs related to the Climate Action Plan
    • $18 million for projects to support Vision Zero safety goals, including bike facilities, sidewalks, traffic signals, crosswalks and traffic calming measures
  7.  

    Solana Beach is the third city in San Diego County to receive the silver level League of American Bicyclists Bicycle Friendly Community Award. Chula Vista and the city of San Diego are bronze-level recipients. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

    City of Solana Beach awarded for bike friendliness
    Bianca Kaplanek June 21, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    SOLANA BEACH — In recognition of its efforts to promote nonmotorized, two-wheeled transportation, the city recently received the silver level League of American Bicyclists Bicycle Friendly Community Award. The honor “truly added us to an elite group of other communities across the nation,” City Manager Greg Wade said when he presented the award at the June 13 meeting to Councilman Dave Zito, who sought the designation three years ago.

    “Under the leadership of this City Council, the quality of life in Solana Beach is being enhanced through environmental sustainability and active transportation initiatives which have clearly demonstrated the city’s commitment to bicycle friendliness and complete street standards,” Wade said. “This recognizes our commitment to improving conditions for bicycling within the community and also the city’s investment in bicycling promotion, education programs, infrastructure and pro-bicycling policies,” he added.
    Since the creation of the Bicycle Friendly Community program in 1995, more than 1,500 community applications have been processed, resulting in 450 recognized communities. Within the county, Solana Beach joins Coronado and Oceanside in achieving silver level status. Chula Vista and San Diego hold bronze level awards.

    Wade said the program “emphasizes that bicycling can be a simple solution to some of the challenges we face as a community.” “Solana Beach and its residents know that bicycling is about mobility, sustainability, health and so much more,” he added. “Local community support and advocacy is also vital.

    “Solana Beach is fortunate to have a group like BikeWalkSolana to advocate on our behalf,” Wade said. “This award truly would not have been possible but for the efforts of BikeWalkSolana. They tirelessly give to the community and … particularly with this grant application … which was no small feat.” He said the process was “thorough and intensive and took quite a bit of effort.”
    In addition to recognizing BikeWalkSolana and Zito, Wade thanked members of the Public Works Department for their help. Zito said the award is a “reflection of the attitude that we have in the city of making sure it’s an active-transportation-friendly city.”
    Each year the league assesses all 50 states through a voluntary application process. Award status last four years. Silver is the third highest level. Recipients can upgrade to gold and platinum.

    To reach gold level, Solana Beach can continue to expand its bike network, upgrade existing facilities to increase protection and separation between modes and partner with neighboring jurisdictions on comprehensive plans for better regional connectivity. The city can also encourage local businesses, agencies and organizations to promote cycling to their employees and customers and seek recognition through the Bicycle Friendly Business program.

    Additionally, Solana Beach could work with law enforcement to ensure that enforcement activities are targeted at motorist infractions most likely to lead to crashes, injuries and fatalities among bicyclists.
  8.  
    Study shows most dangerous spots for bicyclists are Pacific Beach, downtown, Rosecrans Street, Escondido
    David Garrick June21, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Local bicyclists face the most risk of injury crashes in Pacific Beach, downtown San Diego, Rosecrans Street and parts of Oceanside and Escondido, an analysis of law enforcement collision data from 2010 through 2016 shows. Other dangerous areas include Coast Highway in Encinitas, Palm Avenue east of Imperial Beach, University Avenue in North Park, Loma Portal, Mission Beach, Coronado beach and West H Street in Chula Vista. Escondido’s crash hotspots are Washington Street at Broadway and Valley Parkway’s intersections with Midway Drive and Rose Street. In Oceanside, the most dangerous spots are Coast Highway at Eaton Street and Mission Avenue.

    The analysis is part of a project launched by local attorney Michael Bomberger aimed at helping bicyclists ride more safely by making them aware of dangerous areas. Another goal is pressuring the county government, San Diego and other cities to accelerate creation of more protected bike paths and more striped bike lanes on local streets, said Bomberger, whose law practice focuses on injured cyclists. The lack of cycling infrastructure across the county has become a more glaring problem in recent years as cities encourage more people to commute by bicycle to reduce traffic congestion and fight climate change.

    A webpage summarizing the analysis can be found here: ebcyclinglaw.com/san-diego-bicycle-crashes-study/
  9.  
    San Diego City Council Approves Bike Implementation Plan
    City News Service June 21, 2018 kpbs.org
    The San Diego City Council's Environment Committee Thursday unanimously approved a strategic implementation plan for the city's current Bicycle Master Plan, adopted in 2013. The master plan identifies pressing bike-related needs and includes bikeways, programs and other projects intended to improve and maintain the local bicycling environment over a 20-year span. The new plan, developed by the Bicycle Advisory Committee, identifies ways to activate provisions of the earlier document. It also proposes methods to measure success.
    The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035. A foremost priority will be initiating the master plan's "high priority bike projects," of which there are 40, estimated to cost $35 million.


    Cycling commuters. Photo courtesy of SANDAG

    San Diego Bicycle Plan Getting Real: Panel Eyes $312M Bike Network
    Ken Stone June 21, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    “San Diego has what it takes to become a city where bicycles are used for everyday transportation, recreation and general mobility,” said Councilman David Alvarez.

    Overall, building out the master plan’s proposed bike network is estimated to cost $312 million.
    • The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035.
    • The implementation plan’s second objective is to increase rider safety by bolstering enforcement and improving infrastructure in high-fatality areas. That fits into Vision Zero, a goal to eliminate local traffic deaths by 2025.
    • Objective three is to increase bike program funding and grant dollars, specifically for new bikeways and bike-oriented city staff.
    • Objective four is to increase education. Fourth-graders should receive bicycle education, the plan said; public awareness campaigns should be used; and a traffic diversion school should be created for cyclists and drivers cited for bike-related infractions.
    • Objective five emphasizes improving institutional collaboration on bicycle issues within the city and within outside agencies.
    • Finally, the last objective calls for evaluating program effectiveness by tracking bike mode share and reporting to the Bicycle Advisory Board on project implementation status.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:San Diego City Council Approves Bike Implementation Plan
    City News Service June 21, 2018 kpbs.org
    The San Diego City Council's Environment Committee Thursday unanimously approved a strategic implementation plan for the city's current Bicycle Master Plan, adopted in 2013. The master plan identifies pressing bike-related needs and includes bikeways, programs and other projects intended to improve and maintain the local bicycling environment over a 20-year span. The new plan, developed by the Bicycle Advisory Committee, identifies ways to activate provisions of the earlier document. It also proposes methods to measure success.
    The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035. A foremost priority will be initiating the master plan's "high priority bike projects," of which there are 40, estimated to cost $35 million.


    Whoaa!!! Is this for real???
    • CommentAuthorfrank
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2018
     
    <blockquote><cite> Old Knotty Buoy:</cite><a href="http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/politics/sd-me-bike-hotspots-20180621-story.html" target="_blank">Study shows most dangerous spots for bicyclists are Pacific Beach, downtown, Rosecrans Street, Escondido</a> David Garrick June21, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com<blockquote>Local bicyclists face the most risk of injury crashes in Pacific Beach, downtown San Diego, Rosecrans Street and parts of Oceanside and Escondido, an analysis of law enforcement collision data from 2010 through 2016 shows. Other dangerous areas include Coast Highway in Encinitas, Palm Avenue east of Imperial Beach, University Avenue in North Park, Loma Portal, Mission Beach, Coronado beach and West H Street in Chula Vista. Escondido’s crash hotspots are Washington Street at Broadway and Valley Parkway’s intersections with Midway Drive and Rose Street. In Oceanside, the most dangerous spots are Coast Highway at Eaton Street and Mission Avenue. The analysis is part of a project launched by local attorney Michael Bomberger aimed at helping bicyclists ride more safely by making them aware of dangerous areas. Another goal is pressuring the county government, San Diego and other cities to accelerate creation of more protected bike paths and more striped bike lanes on local streets, said Bomberger, whose law practice focuses on injured cyclists. The lack of cycling infrastructure across the county has become a more glaring problem in recent years as cities encourage more people to commute by bicycle to reduce traffic congestion and fight climate change. A webpage summarizing the analysis can be found here: <a href=" https://www.ebcyclinglaw.com/san-diego-bicycle-crashes-study/" target="_blank">ebcyclinglaw.com/san-diego-bicycle-crashes-study/</a></blockquote> That study is heavily flawed. They only discuss intersections and not mid block crashes. It seems they’re considering crashes outside yet close to an intersection as being a crash associated with that intersection too. It’s clever to dig into SWITRS but a brief read of the SWITRS Coding Manual and even the CHP Collision Investigstion Manual would have helped them determine way more than just the approximate location of the crashes.
  10.  


    Escondido Shines group helps clean up bike path
    News Desk June 21, 2018 times-advocate.com
    Last Saturday, June 16, members of Escondido Shines gathered for the first ever Bike Path Clean-Up day. According to Melissa Navarrete of Escondido Shines, “We had about 15 people in attendance, made some great acquaintances and most important met other like-minded community members.” She added, “We picked up a lot of trash, raked up some of the dead leaves, and even painted over some graffiti!” A couple people who were walking the path even joined the group. One man commented on how he is high energy and was looking for something to keep himself busy. He grabbed some bags and worked on getting the path clean.

    “There were a couple small groups up to no good who left the path as we worked on our clean up efforts,” said Navarette. “Several cyclists thanked us as they rode the path. All in all, it was a wonderful way to spend our Saturday morning, not to mention, it was a perfectly overcast morning so we never got hot!” The group is still working on fundraising to buy a bike for “James,” a man who has helped a woman travel along the bike path safely by giving her an escort.
  11.  

    Riders in Los Angeles have organized to try to push through safety improvements for bikers.
    Photo Credit: Megan Miller for The New York Times

    Their Friend Died in a Hit and Run.
    Can They Take on Car Culture in Los Angles?
    Jose A. Del Real June 23, 2018 nytimes.com
    In poor areas of the city, where people are more likely to depend on walking and cycling as the sole means of transportation, residents complain of a disregard for their well-being by drivers who treat their neighborhood streets like highways.

    “Once they see people on bicycles, they think it’s like a homeless person or someone who’s getting to work on their bike because they can’t afford a car,” said Edin Barrientos, who lives in South Los Angeles and founded a cycling group. “And I think that’s why there’s a lot of hostility around here. Drivers and the public don’t see a cyclist’s life as valuable, especially here.”
    “We keep hearing, every week, about people getting run over or hit,” Mr. Barrientos said. “And the city isn’t doing anything, the law isn’t doing anything, and the public isn’t doing anything. So who is going to step up?” Between 2013 and 2017, 489 pedestrians and cyclists were killed by cars across Los Angeles, according to data provided by the city, numbers that have remained stubbornly high.

    In his response. the mayor, Eric Garcetti, introduced a plan called “Vision Zero” in 2015. City officials have put considerable work into identifying high-risk roads, noting that 6 percent of L.A.’s streets account for 65 percent of pedestrian and cyclist deaths. The city has touted the work they have done in the two years since the program began. So far, 11,000 safety improvements ranging from crosswalks to pedestrian rescue islands have been installed.
    “I can empathize and understand the frustration that things aren’t moving fast enough. But we are delivering projects, we have a phased approach to our delivery,” said Nat Gale, principal project coordinator at the Los Angeles Department of Transportation.

    Activists have accused city leaders of failing to show political will amid resistance to road safety improvements; they have also questioned the implementation of Vision Zero. When signed, the program set an ambitious goal to reduce deaths 20 percent by 2017; instead, traffic deaths were down 3 percent. “You’ve got these Vision Zero ideas and plans, but when it comes time to implementing anything, nothing happens,” said Mr. Sims.
    Ted Rogers, a well-known member of the cycling community who has a popular blog, said that he was rooting for Vision Zero to succeed but had been disappointed by the city. “I’ve been a Garcetti supporter for years, going back to when he was on City Council,” Mr. Rogers said, “and he has totally lost me in the last couple years because of this.”

    “I am confident that without our efforts, things would be even worse,” Mr. Garcetti said earlier this year. He said the city’s transportation department would ramp up advertising related to road safety.
    Mr. Rogers, whose BikingInLA blog is an unofficial cyclist safety watchdog, said impediments to safety improvements came back to drivers feeling that sharing the road with cyclists and pedestrians is optional.

    “Drivers in L.A., they accuse bicyclists of being entitled when we want to ride safely on the street but they’re the ones that are entitled,” he said. ”They don’t want to give us an inch.”
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:https://static01.nyt.com/images/2018/06/24/us/24labikes3/merlin_138724764_4ba5817f-1c19-4903-b297-4384c66b1508-master675.jpg
    Riders in Los Angeles have organized to try to push through safety improvements for bikers.
    Photo Credit: Megan Miller for The New York Times

    Their Friend Died in a Hit and Run.
    Can They Take on Car Culture in Los Angles?
    Jose A. Del Real June 23, 2018 nytimes.com
    In poor areas of the city, where people are more likely to depend on walking and cycling as the sole means of transportation, residents complain of a disregard for their well-being by drivers who treat their neighborhood streets like highways.

    “Once they see people on bicycles, they think it’s like a homeless person or someone who’s getting to work on their bike because they can’t afford a car,” said Edin Barrientos, who lives in South Los Angeles and founded a cycling group. “And I think that’s why there’s a lot of hostility around here. Drivers and the public don’t see a cyclist’s life as valuable, especially here.”
    “We keep hearing, every week, about people getting run over or hit,” Mr. Barrientos said. “And the city isn’t doing anything, the law isn’t doing anything, and the public isn’t doing anything. So who is going to step up?” Between 2013 and 2017, 489 pedestrians and cyclists were killed by cars across Los Angeles, according to data provided by the city, numbers that have remained stubbornly high.

    In his response. the mayor, Eric Garcetti, introduced a plan called “Vision Zero” in 2015. City officials have put considerable work into identifying high-risk roads, noting that 6 percent of L.A.’s streets account for 65 percent of pedestrian and cyclist deaths. The city has touted the work they have done in the two years since the program began. So far, 11,000 safety improvements ranging from crosswalks to pedestrian rescue islands have been installed.
    “I can empathize and understand the frustration that things aren’t moving fast enough. But we are delivering projects, we have a phased approach to our delivery,” said Nat Gale, principal project coordinator at the Los Angeles Department of Transportation.

    Activists have accused city leaders of failing to show political will amid resistance to road safety improvements; they have also questioned the implementation of Vision Zero. When signed, the program set an ambitious goal to reduce deaths 20 percent by 2017; instead, traffic deaths were down 3 percent. “You’ve got these Vision Zero ideas and plans, but when it comes time to implementing anything, nothing happens,” said Mr. Sims.
    Ted Rogers, a well-known member of the cycling community who has a popular blog, said that he was rooting for Vision Zero to succeed but had been disappointed by the city. “I’ve been a Garcetti supporter for years, going back to when he was on City Council,” Mr. Rogers said, “and he has totally lost me in the last couple years because of this.”

    “I am confident that without our efforts, things would be even worse,” Mr. Garcetti said earlier this year. He said the city’s transportation department would ramp up advertising related to road safety.
    Mr. Rogers, whose BikingInLA blog is an unofficial cyclist safety watchdog, said impediments to safety improvements came back to drivers feeling that sharing the road with cyclists and pedestrians is optional.

    “Drivers in L.A., they accuse bicyclists of being entitled when we want to ride safely on the street but they’re the ones that are entitled,” he said. ”They don’t want to give us an inch.”


    This is sad.
    • CommentAuthorfrank
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2018
     
    Ted's blog, bikinginla.com is great. He tends to cover SD and statewide news too when he hears about it. If you see something in the news here and email it to him, he'll mention it on the blog and even thank you for the contribution.

    I'd highly recommend bookmarking his blog and adding it to your news diet. He updates it almost daily and of course covers a lot of good news too.

    He did this about a month ago.
    https://bikinginla.com/tag/crashcityhall/
  12.  

    Orozco Ridge will rival the terrain of Snow Summit and Mammoth.
    San Diego Mountain Bike Association

    Twenty miles of bike trails for Pamo Valley
    What the Forest Service came up with
    Dryw Keltz June 27, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    The Pamo Valley is situated to the north of Ramona. It is part of the Palomar Ranger District of the Cleveland National Forest. The region is bookended by Lake Sutherland to the east, and Rancho Guejito to the west. It’s a sprawling expanse of land that is unknown to most San Diegans.

    The Orosco Ridge is part of this region. In the past, one portion of the remote area was often used by local gun enthusiasts as a firing range. Besides that and some hiking and equestrian access, it’s a pretty quiet, desolate area. It currently has a handful of truck roads visitors can use to explore the property. This may change very soon, and in a big way. If the San Diego Mountain Bike Association gets its wishes, construction will begin on 20 miles of brand new singletrack trails that will be open to bikers, hikers and equestrians by the end of this year. It will easily be the largest singletrack trail system in the region, and will rival California resort parks such as Snow Summit and Mammoth for quality of terrain.

    “We went to the Forest Service with a number of different concepts and they weren’t too hot on what we were proposing in other areas," San Diego Mountain Bike Association vice president Ben Stone said. “We said, ‘All right, where should we look at expanding recreation on this district?’ This was the general area they came back with. That’s based on the way the forest was zoned within their own land-use plan. This area was sort-of zoned as backcountry non-motorized, and some of it is a little motorized.”
    Stone stressed that everything they build will be “100% singletrack” that will be between two to four feet wide. About half the trails will have to be accessible by horses, so these routes will include less of the bike-specific features (drop-offs/banked turns) and will be built to control people’s speed while descending.

    “The directional trails will be more purpose-built for mountain biking. There will be some natural rock drop-offs. There are some huge boulders that are the size of houses out there, and you can incorporate them into the trail system. There will be varying degrees of difficulty that will manage what the design will look like but, really, there’s going to be something for everyone out there—whether you’re looking for an intermediate sort of ‘flow trail’ that keeps your momentum going naturally to something that really needs to be traversed by a pretty skilled rider,” Stone said.
    “We have to follow the National Environmental Policy Act. So, all the specialists from the forest service have to review our trail corridor for sensitive resources—botany, plants, animal species, even small birds and reptiles. Anything that is federally listed or endangered. We don’t want to disrupt any species that is out here. Cultural as well. Any archeology we want to avoid. As the specialists survey this area they will make recommendations on things we need to avoid or modifications we need to make to the trail system. That’s really all that remains. Once they finish their surveys they will make recommendations to the district ranger, and then the district ranger will get to decide if they want to move forward on the project or not,” Stone said.

    One last twist to this story is that the Palomar Ranger District currently has an interim ranger. A new, permanent, ranger will be hired in three to four months and will likely get the final say as to whether or not this project lives or dies. If it does move forward, the entire trail system has the potential to be completed within a year.
  13.  
    Saturday car event hears concerns of Rancho Santa Fe residents
    Karen Billing June 18, 2018 ranchosantafereview.com
    Newly-elected board member Sharon Ruhnau said that the speed of cars is a problem, particularly for those on horseback. She said on Saturday mornings she knows not to cross on Via de Santa Fe because cars will be ripping through at high speed. “As a rider you put yourself in harm’s way just by riding the trails,” she said.

    Danola noted that cyclists, walkers and runners are also at risk by cars coming quickly around the Covenant roads’ many blind corners.

    Siino said they are aware of these concerns and have posted rules to their visitors: arrive and leave quietly, comply with posted speed limits, be courteous and obey traffic laws, and to stand on the sidewalks not the street. They have also advised drivers not to rev their engines because it disturbs residents and alarms horses, to drive carefully on the curvy roads, and to be watchful for bicyclists.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:Saturday car event hears concerns of Rancho Santa Fe residents
    Karen Billing June 18, 2018 ranchosantafereview.com
    Newly-elected board member Sharon Ruhnau said that the speed of cars is a problem, particularly for those on horseback. She said on Saturday mornings she knows not to cross on Via de Santa Fe because cars will be ripping through at high speed. “As a rider you put yourself in harm’s way just by riding the trails,” she said.

    Danola noted that cyclists, walkers and runners are also at risk by cars coming quickly around the Covenant roads’ many blind corners.

    Siino said they are aware of these concerns and have posted rules to their visitors: arrive and leave quietly, comply with posted speed limits, be courteous and obey traffic laws, and to stand on the sidewalks not the street. They have also advised drivers not to rev their engines because it disturbs residents and alarms horses, to drive carefully on the curvy roads, and to be watchful for bicyclists.

    To paraphrase...
  14.  

    Mixed-use project on Highway 101 gets green light from Solana Beach council

    Joe Tash July 11, 2018 delmartimes.net
    After years of planning, false starts and community debate, the Solana Beach City Council approved a mixed-use development at Highway 101 and Dahlia Drive, on the site of a former mobile home park that neighbors described as an "eyesore." The action to approve the Solana 101 project came on a unanimous vote of the council following more than three hours of discussion and testimony at a meeting on Tuesday, July 10.

    City Manager Greg Wade, who gave a presentation on the project to the council, said an environmental study determined that the most significant impact of the project will be the generation of greenhouse gases, both from vehicle traffic and energy consumption by residents and businesses. In order to reduce the project's carbon footprint, said Wade, the developer has agree to such measures as generating solar power on site, installing 54 electric vehicle charging stations, purchasing green power through Solana Beach's community choice aggregation program and contributing funding for 12 shared electric-powered bicycles.

    Shared use of electric bicycles will go a long way toward reducing GHG's, traffic, parking hassles, noise, and other impacts to Quality of Life issues. Imagine going out locally for lunch or a coffee, a quick grocery run or to pick up some surf wax without having to jump into an automobile. Easy peasy and allows for enjoyment of the coastal environment, engagement with the community and way less demands of, or impact on, the built infrastructure.

    Building in charging stations with parking that can accommodate e-bikes and e-scooters as well as e-vehicles is thinking ahead as the e-revolution becomes more ubiquitous. The efficiency and utilitarian advantages are just beginning to be realized and understood. All future building should be required to accommodate e-charging just as the new laws require solar panels. Maybe give credit for required parking to some proportion of e-bikes, thus reducing costs to builders or at least to compensate them for e-charging requirements. Just saying.
  15.  
    Local electric vehicle drivers receiving $500 each in SDG&E bill credit
    July 12, 2018 valleycenter.com/
    Thousands of electric vehicle (EV) drivers in San Diego and southern Orange counties are receiving a $500 credit on their San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) bill, as a reward for adopting clean transportation to help reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. About 15,000 EV drivers in SDG&E’s service territory applied for the Electric Vehicle Climate Credit by the May 31 deadline and qualified to receive the bill credit. SDG&E started applying the credit to customers’ bills in mid-June and expects to complete the process by early August, using up all the 2018 program funds. The bill credit is funded by the Low Carbon Fuel Standard Program implemented by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to fight climate change and encourage EV adoption.

    Plug-in vehicles, whether they are fully electric or hybrid, produce low or zero emissions, and therefore help reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Funding for the EV Climate Credit came from the sale of low-carbon fuel credits SDG&E earned for providing clean electricity as a fuel for transportation. About 45 percent of the energy SDG&E delivers today to homes and businesses comes from renewable sources, such as solar and wind.

    This is the second year that the EV Climate Credit has been provided to SDG&E customers. SDG&E led a multi-faceted campaign via social media, email and traditional mass media to encourage EV drivers to apply for the credit. More than 29,000 electric vehicles are registered with the DMV in the region. The bill credit amount has varied each year depending on the CARB regulations, number of EV drivers and the amount of revenues available to fund it. In 2017, SDG&E distributed about $1.4 million in credit, or about $200 each, to about 7,000 EV drivers who signed up for the program. This year, the EV Climate Credit came out to more than double last year’s amount in large part because of the amount of revenue available to fund it.

    Again, the question demands to be asked, why are e-bikes left out of this program? There must be some way a program of economic encouragement or rebate for early adapters can be utilized to accelerate the transition to, or embracing of, Electric-Bike Vehicles (e-bike's). Maybe a one time discount at point of purchase, an electric bill credit for providing and using charging stations in parking structures or garages, rebates on batteries when new ones are needed and/or recycled, etc. etc.

    Supporting e-bike usage helps to accelerate the adoption of bike infrastructure while reducing the costs of roadway maintenance in the future, accelerates the attainment of CAP goals and improves Quality of Life. Single occupancy use is most efficient, pound for pound, watt for watt, with e-bikes, e-scooters and such. Compare the power used between an e-bike and a Toyota Prius when only one person is being transported. A very big difference in energy used as well as space used on the roads and space used for parking/storage.


    I think old Benjamin Franklin would be digging the whole EV (e-bike) revolution!

    "A penny saved is a penny earned”
    ~ Benjamin Franklin

    I believe that a "penny saved is a nickel earned". Once you've accounted for the costs of earning, i.e. transportation costs to get to job, opportunity costs of your time, taxes at many levels, educational costs, professional dues, health care costs, myriad layers of non-productive bureaucracy, etc. etc., you'll have to "earn" at least five times what you end up with in your pocket. If you can hold onto that penny, you'll not need to earn the nickel.

    Conservation is the low hanging fruit of economic prosperity.

    Of course it's true of energy as well. Both in the literal and metaphorical sense of the word. The value of conserving physical energy is far greater than the costs of producing it. The value of conserving cognitive or spiritual energy is far greater than the costs of fixing it.

    The same can be argued for transportation costs. If you can save by riding a bike, you'll substantially reduce the associated needed costs of the supporting infrastructure. By not producing GHG's, you'll not incur the high costs of mitigating it.

    What great returns on an investment of conservation.
  16.  
    Carmel Valley man sues city after bike accident
    Joe Tash July 17, 2018 delmartimes.net
    A raised section of concrete in a storm drain alongside a bike lane is at the center of a $10 million lawsuit filed by a Carmel Valley man, who alleges the defect caused him to crash his bike and suffer debilitating injuries.
    At issue is an American sweet gum tree planted near the spot where the accident occurred. According to the lawsuit, roots from the tree pushed up both a nearby sidewalk and the storm drain, leading to a section of concrete being raised two to three inches. The lawsuit alleges that the city and other defendants either knew or should have known about the dangerous condition and fixed it.
    Cizauskas, an experienced bike rider, was on a ride from his Carmel Valley home to La Jolla Shores beach - a distance of 11 or 12 miles - when the front tire of his bike hit the raised edge of the concrete slab, in the 12500 block of Carmel Canyon Road. The raised section of concrete was at the edge of the bike lane where Cizauskas was riding.

    According to Cizauskas, the accident occurred about 3 p.m. when the bike lane was in shadow, concealing the hazard from view. "I didn't even see it," he said. "I smashed into it and my bike lurched upward."
    Named in the lawsuit along with the city of San Diego are West Coast Arborists, Inc. and Landscapes USA Inc., which handle tree and landscape maintenance for the area where the crash occurred under contract with the city.

    Kane Handel, who specializes in personal injury cases, said one city employee testified in a deposition that he had reported the potentially hazardous situation to the city streets department due to the tree's roots pushing up the nearby sidewalk, but no action was taken. The employee also said he had contacted the tree care company, but a representative told him the tree was healthy and not a candidate for removal. Handel said city employees - such as those who painted the bike lane markings - should have been trained to spot such hazards. City street sweepers also passed by once a week, she said.

    "Everybody in the world (went) by this and no one did anything about it," she said.
  17.  


    SD City Council Approves Bicycle Master Plan’s Implementation

    Alexander Nguyen July 23, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    The San Diego City Council on Monday unanimously approved a Strategic Implementation Plan for the city’s Bicycle Master Plan, adopted in 2013. The master plan identifies pressing bike-related needs and includes bikeways, programs and other projects intended to improve the local bicycling environment and bolster bicycling’s popularity over a 20-year span.

    The new plan, developed by the Bicycle Advisory Committee, provides recommendations to implement provisions of the earlier document and also proposes methods to evaluate program success. Overall, building out the master plan’s proposed bike network is estimated to cost $312.3 million. The advisory committee’s implementation plan targets 40 high-priority projects, including bike lanes and paths, expected to cost $34.7 million.

    “This is thoughtful and it gives us guidance and it keeps us moving,” City Councilman David Alvarez said. “I will acknowledge there are some things that we would like to set in stone, but I think this is much better than what we had.” Alvarez said greater clarity is needed on timelines and funding mechanisms to implement projects included in the plan.

    City Councilwoman Georgette Gomez echoed his concerns. “We can set a document, but it’s easy to lose its implementation if we’re not pushing ourselves. We’re hoping that in the second round update of this plan we can include that,” she said. The plan should also include details on securing project money outside the city’s general fund, possibly in the form of grants, Gomez said.
    The strategic plan approved Monday includes six objectives and 30 tasks to implement the Bicycle Master Plan.

    • The first objective calls for increasing the mode share of bicycle transport in transit-priority areas to 6 percent by 2020 and 18 percent by 2035.
    • The implementation plan’s second objective is to increase rider safety by bolstering enforcement and improving infrastructure in high-fatality areas. That fits into Vision Zero, a goal to eliminate local traffic deaths by 2025.
    • Objective three is to increase bike program funding and grant dollars, specifically for new bikeways and bike-oriented city staff. The plan suggests staffing a “mobility champion” in the mayor’s office, continuing bike share programs and coordinating with street resurfacing crews to implement bike-friendly designs on a rolling basis.
    • Objective four is to increase education. Fourth-graders should receive bicycle education; public awareness campaigns should be used; and a traffic diversion school should be created for cyclists and drivers cited for bike-related infractions, according to the plan.
    • Objective five emphasizes improving institutional collaboration on bicycle issues within the city and within outside agencies. The plan calls for regular stakeholder meetings to be held with the Bicycle Advisory Board, the San Diego Association of Governments, Caltrans, the Port of San Diego, Business Improvement Districts, airports, schools as well as military, tourism and tribal agencies. City policies can also be reviewed and changed to better accommodate bicycling; Community Plan Updates can be written with bikes in mind; and city staff can be trained on Vision Zero goals, according to the plan.
    • The last objective calls for evaluating program effectiveness by tracking bike mode share and reporting to the Bicycle Advisory Board on project implementation status.

    City News Service
    (see June 21st, 2018 posting above)
  18.  
    News and community briefs for Pacific Beach and Mission Beach
    July 26, 2018 sdnews.com
    Bait Bike program picking up speed:

    The Bait Bike program created to catch thieves using GPS tracking on vehicles costing enough to make their theft a felony rather than a misdemeanor is working. Best of all, the conviction rate for those nabbed is 100 percent, say police.

    “The District Attorney has assigned us a prosecutor for all our cases,” said San Diego Police officer Daniel Niefer, who has been with the bait bike program since its inception in 2014. “Since last year, we’ve had 22 felony arrests.” Niefer said, with two bike-theft cases pending, that 129 of 131 total arrests since the start of the program have resulted in convictions.

    In June 2017, District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf announced at a press conference she was successful in getting $3,000 in funding for the bait-bike program from the City's budget. San Diego Police Department was on hand then to discuss the bait-bike program, which uses a GPS tracking system to alert them within minutes of when a bait bike is taken.

    Niefer said a couple of criminals convicted of running illegal bike chop shops where stolen bikes are repurposed, have served prison time for the crime. “The word is out,” said Niefer that the bait-bike program is in place and doing its job. Niefer feels good about being a part of the enforcement effort. “I originated the program,” he said. “We’ve gotten [thieves] convicted and off the street.”

    City to install bike racks:

    In its continuing effort to promote alternative transportation and improve bicycle infrastructure, the City of San Diego has announced plans to install hundreds of bicycle racks in neighborhoods citywide. The City, which has already designated more than 50 bicycle racks for the downtown area as part of its comprehensive Downtown Mobility Plan, is also seeking input via local business improvement districts (BIDs) to provide recommendations for additional bike rack installation locations in the community. The proposed 50 downtown bike rack locations correspond with developing cycle tracks – also known as protected bike lanes – being installed to improve ease and safety of bicycle ridership downtown.

    The bicycle rack initiative, dubbed “BIDs to Bike Racks,” is a collaborative effort between the Mayor’s Office and the City’s Transportation and Storm Water and Economic Development departments, and impacts every business improvement district across the city. Collaborating directly with BIDs will help achieve the goal to place bike racks in strategic locations within each community that best serve cyclists.

    • The addition of hundreds of new bike racks throughout the city will complement the improved and developing bicycle infrastructure and offer more places to safely secure bicycles.
    • Cyclists interested in locating existing bike racks are encouraged to use the City’s interactive map, which allows for convenient ride planning. Increasing bicycle ridership is a key strategy of the City’s Climate Action Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
    • The City of San Diego was recently named a “Bike Friendly Community” by The League of American Bicyclists.

    “We’re building a more bike-friendly city every day and these new bicycle racks will encourage more folks to get around on two wheels instead of four,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer. “As we continue to improve transportation options citywide, it’s important to provide an orderly place for cyclists and casual riders to store their bikes so the public spaces in our neighborhoods are free from clutter.”
  19.  
    Bicyclist Killed in Rancho San Diego Crash
    Debbie L. Sklar August 4, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Shortly after 8 a.m., a bicyclist died after he apparently veered into the path of an oncoming car in Rancho San Diego Saturday, police said.

    '..an unidentified man on a Masi Gran Corsa road bike suddenly turned left out of the bike lane,'

    Authorities were working to determine the man’s identity.
    I usually try to avoid posting such incidents, but maybe someone can help out the family and Police in identifying this bicyclist.
  20.  
    Swerved into Oceanside bike lane with stolen Honda
    Ten years and deportation for manslaughter
    By Eva Knott, Aug. 6, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    In court today, Felix Aaron Ruiz Bazan admitted he killed a bicyclist almost a year ago, in a plea deal in which he expects to be sentenced to ten years in prison. Officials alleged that offender Bazan was driving a Honda sedan that had been stolen the day before, on a suspended license, and under the influence of drugs, at the time of the fatal collision.
  21.  
    San Diego Police to Increase Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Enforcement
    Debbie L. Sklar August 30, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    The San Diego Police Department announced that officers will conduct bicycle and pedestrian safety enforcement operations Thursday August 30, 2018. The increased enforcement will take place from noon to 8 p.m.

    Police have mapped out locations throughout San Diego where pedestrian- and bicycle-involved collisions have occurred over the last three years, and will focus routine traffic patrols on known “trouble spots,” according to a statement from the department. Special targeted patrols will also be deployed to crack down on drivers who violate traffic laws, as well as pedestrians, bicyclists and scooter riders who cross the street illegally or fail to yield when traffic has the right-of-way.

    –City News Service
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:San Diego Police to Increase Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Enforcement
    Debbie L. Sklar August 30, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    The San Diego Police Department announced that officers will conduct bicycle and pedestrian safety enforcement operations Thursday August 30, 2018. The increased enforcement will take place from noon to 8 p.m.

    Police have mapped out locations throughout San Diego where pedestrian- and bicycle-involved collisions have occurred over the last three years, and will focus routine traffic patrols on known “trouble spots,” according to a statement from the department. Special targeted patrols will also be deployed to crack down on drivers who violate traffic laws, as well as pedestrians, bicyclists and scooter riders who cross the street illegally or fail to yield when traffic has the right-of-way.

    –City News Service


    Somehow, I expect that this will be 90% targeted at pedestrians and cyclists.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2018
     
    Shady John:Somehow, I expect that this will be 90% targeted at pedestrians and cyclists.
    You bet. If they (for once) targetted cars failing to yield to pedestrians lawfully crossing the street, they would be writing non-stop citations to motorists all day. But will they? Nah - let's target peds and cyclists (who only put themselves in danger when they break the law).
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    SANDAG Recruits Top Los Angeles Planner as New Executive Director
    https://timesofsandiego.com/politics/2018/09/14/sandag-recruits-top-los-angeles-planner-as-new-executive-director/
    “My goal coming in will be to listen and learn,” he added. “I will need a deep knowledge of all the communities and stakeholders of the San Diego region if I am to do my job, which will be to help all of us build a shared vision for the future and then make that vision a reality.”
  22.  
    San Diego continues hands-off approach as electric scooter injuries mount
    Joshua Emerson Smith September 16, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    From broken bones and teeth to punctured lungs and lacerations requiring plastic surgery — injuries from riding dockless electric scooters have, according to medical professionals, landed people in emergency rooms all over California. While San Francisco and Los Angeles are rolling out strict rules for start-up scooter companies operating in their jurisdictions, city officials in San Diego haven’t been able to agree on how best to address rising concerns.

    The City Council has repeatedly brushed aside calls from some elected officials to impose regulations on dockless scooter companies operating locally, including Razor, Lime and Bird. By contrast, pilot programs in Southern California and the Bay Area are instituting fees, collecting ridership data and requiring safety plans from startup scooter companies, which are flush with hundreds of millions of dollars in investor cash.

    Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s office recently told the Union-Tribune in an emailed statement that the city was looking into “developing a set of rules that focus on rider safety and operator responsibility that will allow for the natural growth of this alternative form of transportation.” However, spokesman Greg Block said the mayor was skeptical about adopting a permitting system similar to those being piloted in other major cities. “We don’t want to do anything that’s going to stop them from doing business here, but we want to figure out ways to make people be more responsible and safe with how they’re riding,” he said.

    Councilwoman Barbara Bry, who has been calling on Mayor Faulconer and members of the City Council for months to reign in dockless scooter companies, called the city’s current hands-off approach “naive.” “They’re using our streets and illegally using our sidewalks to make money and provide a service that I believe is valuable but needs to be regulated,” she said. “We’re not going to scare them away,” she added. “We are the eighth largest city in the country. We have sunshine every day. We’re a tourist mecca. They’re going to be delighted to pay fees and have money upfront to pay for infrastructure.

    Treatment of scooter injuries have been mounting at Scripps Mercy Hospital, said Dr. Vishal Bansal, the hospital’s medical director of trauma. “We’re having these electric scooters that can travel very fast, where there’s no safety restraint, no effort to know if the riders are intoxicated,” he said. “To me that’s a public-health disaster in the making.” Scripps Mercy is now spearheading an effort to collect data on scooter injuries to quantify the issue and get a better sense of the circumstances that lead to the worst accidents, Bansal said. “It’s a serious issue,” he said. “It’s getting worse, not better, and we don’t see any effort to improve safety of these devices in San Diego.

    Emergency physicians at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center have launched a similar effort, which ultimately envisions working with law enforcement to collect and catalog detailed injury reports. “We’re creating this huge surveillance database were we link ambulance, police and hospital data all together so that we get as complete a picture as we can,” said Catherine Juillard, trauma surgeon at the hospital. “We don’t want to be divisive about it,” she added. “It’s more about figuring out if there’s some low-hanging fruit in terms of safety that we could implement to make things safer.

    In the meantime, San Francisco recently announced it has chosen scooter companies Scoot and Skip for their permit program, in large part because the city approved of proposals by the businesses to improve public safety. Specifically, they have pledged to deploy safety ambassadors and offer in-person training to the public. The companies are also deploying scooters in under-served neighborhoods and offering discounts to low-income users. Specifically, they have pledged to deploy safety ambassadors and offer in-person training to the public. The companies are also deploying scooters in under-served neighborhoods and offering discounts to low-income users. The program, which is administered by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, is recovering costs through an annual permit fee of $25,000 and a $10,000 endowment.
  23.  
    (cont.)
    The city of Los Angeles is rolling out similar rules that require all scooters to have a posted notice, in at least 40-point font, telling users not to ride on the sidewalks. The city is also requiring scooter companies to limit vehicle speeds to 15 miles per hour. Companies must pay $20,000 a year for a permit to operate in Los Angeles, and a $130-per-vehicle fee. Operators are also required to maintain a 24-hour hotline for complaints, specifically for improperly parked or broken scooters.

    In San Diego, where long-promised bike lanes throughout the city have yet to fully materialize, many scooter users have also taken to riding on sidewalks, frustrating business and unnerving pedestrians. However, it’s unclear how, if at all, the city plans to address the situation. The police department has said that ticketing scooter riders is a low priority given limited resources.

    At the same time, Lime and Bird, according to disclosure reports, have paid local lobbyists tens of thousands of dollars in recent months to meet with the mayor and City Council and, at least in part, oppose regulations that would limit where the scooters could operate. All three scooter companies operating in San Diego, Lime, Bird and Razor declined multiple interview requests for this story. Lime issued this email statement: "Safety is our top priority, which is why we urge riders to practice safe riding not only for their own protection, but also for the safety of the larger community. We also urge riders to wear helmets both through notifications on the app and on the actual scooter.”

    One of the most vocal opponents of regulating scooter companies has been Councilman Chris Ward — whose District 3 includes some of the areas most popular among scooter riders, from downtown to North Park, Hillcrest and Little Italy. Ward, who also declined interview requests for this story, led the charge against a recently proposed ban on scooters on the boardwalk in Mission Beach and Pacific Beach. Circulate San Diego, a nonprofit that advocates for bicycle safety and public transit, has also taken a dim view of imposing regulations on the new industry. Maya Rosas, advocacy manager with the transportation nonprofit, said that the best way to protect scooter riders and get them off the sidewalk is for the city to follow through on plans to build bicycle lanes. “Building safe travel lanes and removing conflicts between cars and other modes is what saves lives and eliminates risk,” she said.

    The treasurer of Circulate San Diego’s board of directors, Clarissa Falcon, has been hired by Bird to lobby City Hall. She deferred a request for an interview to her client.

    Councilman Chris Cate’s office said that it plans to address concerns at the City Council’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee on Wednesday. Representatives for scooter companies are scheduled to give presentations and take questions from elected officials.
  24.  
    San Diego struggles to keep up with how people get around
    Michael Smolens September 16, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com


    Maybe we can finally put to rest the notion that 18 percent of San Diegans in urban areas will be commuting on bicycles by 2035. That figure was greeted with much skepticism when it was introduced into the equation for the city of San Diego to meet the long-term goals of its Climate Action Plan. That overly ambitious expectation seems even more so now that people are getting around in different ways than they did when the plan was drafted a handful of years ago.

    Uber had started in San Diego in 2012. Since then, other new forms of transportation — from scooters to free shuttles — have surprised, disappointed and confounded civic officials, who are struggling to figure out how to manage ever-changing modes of transportation on streets and sidewalks. On the upside, maybe the unanticipated popularity of scooters — and whatever else is coming that we don’t know about — will help fill in the bicycle transit goal.

    San Diego City Council member Chris Ward is pushing to create a new Mobility Board to look at the broad landscape of transit, particularly the options for short-distance trips, according to a report by the Union-Tribune’s David Garrick. Creating another committee to deal with an issue officials have been unable to tackle so far — such as developing a coherent strategy for short transit links — can easily trigger a roll of the eyes. But at least this one, hopefully, would have the charge to look at all options and the flexibility to adjust to new ones, including such things as self-driving cars. One of the consequences of the new panel could be to dilute one of the more effective voices regarding alternative transportation — bicycle advocates.

    The new board may absorb, and lead to the demise of, the city’s Bicycle Advisory Board, which was created in 2014. The bicycle board created a plan to move forward with city bike lanes, which won City Council approval in July. Judging by the city’s pacing and financing strategy, that plan is still pretty much in the slow lane. The bike board believes that getting more lanes — and quickly — will spur more ridership, moving the city closer to its goal. Outspoken members have pushed hard for their cause, which hasn’t always been appreciated among some in City Hall.

    The new board would have a broad scope, but likely not the authority to match it. Ward and others envision the panel dealing not only with the issues arising from different modes of transportation, but how they intersect with the climate plan and city’s Vision Zero program to eliminate fatalities of pedestrians and others in traffic-related incidents. That’s a tall order. Just figuring out what kind of progress is being made on the city’s landmark Climate Action Plan is difficult enough. The city was slow in developing a tracking plan for alternative transportation, including bicycle use, according to the Union-Tribune’s Joshua Emerson Smith. Officials said they had few models to learn from because not many cities had similar goals, and those that did had little consistency in how they collected data.
  25.  
    (cont.)
    Bicycle commuting isn’t the only thing struggling to meet expectations in San Diego. Free Ride Everywhere Downtown, or FRED, is falling short of its goals. The service transports people in the downtown area for free on little jitneys — essentially stretch golf carts. Customers can summon a ride on a cellphone app or hail one on the street. FRED’s ridership and advertising have not met projections, and it’s expensive to operate compared with alternatives, according to Andrew Keatts of the Voice of San Diego. His analysis shows the system administered by the nonprofit association Civic San Diego costs more than $6 a rider, much more than comparable figures for the Metropolitan Transit System’s buses and trolleys. It also costs more per rider than using the Uber private ride-sharing service, Keatts reported.

    FRED projects 173,000 riders this year, less than the 180,000 anticipated. The service is funded by parking revenues and advertising. Organizations behind FRED expect ridership to grow. They plan to increase the number of vehicles and possibly expand the service area. Betsy Brennan, Downtown Partnership’s CEO, acknowledged there are challenges. “We can always evaluate and figure out if we can do things more efficiently, but we also need to try things,” she told Keatts. “When FRED started, we didn’t have scooters or e-bikes downtown. We need a whole toolbox — fixed rides, point-to-point options and of course transit is so important for the vitality of downtown.

    Dockless bikes (including electronic ones) not long ago seemed all the rage, after suddenly appearing on city streets and sidewalks. Some speculated they could fill that “first mile, last mile” void between home, work and other destinations that has stumped transportation experts. Then came the scooters, again appearing out of the blue with similar promise. The scooters, unregulated in San Diego, have become popular but are facing a growing backlash. Critics view them as urban trash, littering sidewalks, parks and other public rights of way. News organizations across the country have run stories on a rash of injuries suffered by riders. Encounters with pedestrians and cars have not turned out well.

    "Injuries are coming in fast and furious," Michael Sise, chief of medical staff at San Diego’s Scripps Mercy Hospital, recently told The Washington Post. "It's just a matter of time before someone is killed. I'm absolutely certain of it.” The scooter is such a recent phenomenon that there’s no data available to fully gauge the extent of the injury risk or how it compares with, say, riding a bike.

    What started as a fun oddity has become a mainstream convenience or nuisance, depending on one’s point of view. Scooter use could expand because of the former or fade because of the latter. It’s a good bet they will be more regulated eventually. In any event, it could be a rough ride for scooters. To paraphrase (and clean up) an infamous quote from comedian Denis Leary: Life’s tough; get a helmet.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2018
     
    How do the accident rates for scooters compare to those of automobile users?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2018 edited
     
    Numbers a little out of date, but you get the overall gist:

    The OTS reported 5,200+ individuals were killed or injured in 2013 San Diego car crashes. Of those:

    700+ crashes involved alcohol
    175+ involved a motorcycle accident
    590+ involved a pedestrian accident
    480 involved a bicycle accident
    770+ were related to speed
    300+ were a hit and run accident
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2018 edited
     
    2018 Update:
    1 crashes involved scooter

    My condolences to family and friends.
  26.  
    Woman Arrested on Suspicion of Seriously Injuring Boy in El Cajon Hit-and-Run
    Debbie L. Sklar October 5, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    A 25-year-old woman is behind bars Friday on suspicion of striking a 9-year-old boy with her car, seriously injuring the bicyclist, along an East County street before fleeing the scene, El Cajon Police said. Officers responding to West Main Street and Sunshine Avenue in El Cajon found the child lying in the roadway, unconscious, shortly after 7:30 a.m. Thursday, according to police.

    Medics took the victim, whose name was withheld, to a hospital, where he was admitted for treatment of significant head trauma. According to witness accounts, the eastbound motorist, later identified as 25-year-old Courtney Webber, apparently ran a red light and drove directly into the path of the child as he pedaled to the north, Lt. Stephen Kirk said.

    I would guess this young bike commuter was on his way to Johnson Elementary School at this time of the morning. Main Street runs east/west and the low Sun could easily make visibility difficult for a driver going east in the morning. It's getting to be that time of year when the rising and setting Sun is a factor during the heavy traffic 'rush hour'.

    All schools should take advantage of the free educational programs offered by iCommute and SDCBC.org. Student commuters can learn much to ride safely and account for differing conditions during the year. It's most critical in the mornings when both students and vehicles are 'rushing' to their destinations. They share the road at that time and need to be extra vigilant.

    With school now well under way, all drivers should take extra precautions and look for student commuters, being on bike or foot, around neighborhoods and schools. The light is changing rapidly this time of year and the mornings will be darker until the revision to Daylight Standard Time on November 4th, 2018. It's a good time to have students get bike lights in good working order. Reflective fabric/tape on clothing, backpacks, helmets and bikes can help as well.

    I hope all NEWS Media covers this story and can emphasize the need for added vigilance and awareness on the part of all parties, but especially the drivers out there. Hopefully the SDCBC can get a word in, to highlight their educational programs and to point out key skills to help make our roadways safer. This might also be a good chance for the Vision Zero peeps to bring attention to their goals. This is a difficult situation for all involved and a focused effort is needed to bring attention to student commuter safety and make drivers conscious of their roll in eliminating these tragedies.


    Sessions Elementary School
    Bike Rodeo – 2018: A big group of students from Kate Sessions Elementary were taught bike riding skills, road safety skills and bike maintenance skills at their bike rodeo on May 9th, 2018. With giveaways like helmets, lights, water bottles and snacks, these young student commuters have an enhanced appreciation and skill set for independent, healthy, active transportation. Strong bodies lead to strong minds. Educated bicyclist are safe bicyclist!

    BikeWalk San Diego~D2: Bicycling Skills for Students
    iCommute.com: Walk, Ride, and Roll to School Education Services Registration Form
    San Diego County Bicycle Coalition: Education
    San Diego County Bicycle Coalition: Classes + Workshops
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2018 edited
     
    el patron
    !El Patrón!
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/floyd-landis-comes-back-to-cyclingas-the-boss-1538650800?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=1#CBD
    One thing that always amazes me about the beautiful yet bedeviled sport of professional cycling is this: Just when you think you’ve seen it all…you see something else.

    Case in point: Floyd Landis is starting a professional cycling team.

    Apologies for the pay wall.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2018
     
    Perhaps if the driver that struck the boy got a serious sentence and lost their driving privileges for life, other drivers might show more caution.

    I theorize that most of these hit and runs involve intoxicated drivers who figure the penalties for hit and run are lower than for drunk driving incidents.
  27.  
    They're at it again...



    San Diego Police Plan Bike, Pedestrian, Scooter Safety Enforcement
    Debbie L. Sklar October 14, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Bike riders, scooter users and pedestrians — and bad drivers — in Mission Beach and Pacific Beach will be targeted for safety enforcement by San Diego Police Sunday. Increased ticket-writing started at 9 a.m. and was to extend to 5 p.m. in the beach neighborhoods, an officer said.

    Police have mapped out locations throughout San Diego where pedestrian- and bicycle-involved collisions have occurred over the last three years, and will focus routine traffic patrols on known “trouble spots,” according to a statement from the department. Special targeted patrols will also be deployed to crack down on drivers who violate traffic laws, as well as pedestrians, bicyclists and scooter riders who cross the street illegally or fail to yield when traffic has the right-of-way.

    San Diego police have investigated thousands of fatal and injury collisions involving bicyclists and pedestrians over the past three years, the statement said. Officers were conducting the safety operations along Mission Boulevard in Pacific Beach Sunday morning, San Diego Police Officer Mark McCullough said.

    Funding for the enforcement operations program was provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

    –City News Service
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    ^^
    So glad to see SDPD keeping our streets safe from scofflaw bike riders, scooter users and pedestrians.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTime5 days ago edited
     
    Police have mapped out locations throughout San Diego where pedestrian- and bicycle-involved collisions have occurred over the last three years
    Always, always ticket the victims...
  28.  
    San Diego Wins Bloomberg Millions in American Cities Climate Challenge
    Ken Stone October 17, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego is among four cities named Wednesday to join the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Natural Resources Defense Council President Rhea Suh said Los Angeles, San Jose and Portland, Oregon, were also selected for the $70 million effort by Bloomberg’s American Cities Initiative to support and enhance a total of 20 cities’ capacities to fight the effects of climate change and create environmentally sustainable solutions.

    The response to our Climate Challenge was overwhelming,” Bloomberg said. “Cities all across the country put forward thoughtful and innovative proposals. Selecting the ones with the most ambitious goals — and the most realistic plans for reaching them — was not easy. But Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, and Portland all stood out, and we’re glad to include them in the group of winners.

    The American Cities Climate Challenge gives cities the tools they need to lead the way,” Suh said. “With cities generating the majority of the fossil fuel pollution driving climate change, and bearing the brunt of its impacts, fighting climate change begins in City Hall. These mayors are committed to delivering a brighter, more hopeful tomorrow for future generations.

    According to Bloomberg Philanthropies, San Diego city officials led by Mayor Kevin Faulconer pledged to work with Bloomberg and his partners to make public and environmentally friendly transit choices more accessible to residents, incentivize land owners to build housing developments closer to public transit access points and implement an energy plan based solely on renewable energy sources.

    San Diego is proud to be recognized as a national leader for climate action and to be one of only 20 winners of the American Cities Climate Challenge,” Faulconer said in a Twitter post. “Through this Bloomberg Philanthropies program, we’ll receive support to meet our climate goals.”

    — City News Service

    Okay then… let's put actions to all the self-congratulatory rhetoric;
    • We need the Downtown Mobility Plan to promote bicycle usage with protected bike lanes, bike & scooter share, bike parking, bike boxes, timed signals and other such modernizing facilities for bicyclist, scooter and pedestrian safety. Couple that with pedestrian improvements like bulb-outs, improved crosswalks, wide sidewalks and modern walk signals, CAP goals can be significantly addressed.
    • Continue to build out bicycle infrastructure as sewer and water pipe replacement is completed, roads resurfaced and bridges rebuilt. Properly coordinating such work realizes more 'bang for the buck', in turn yielding more such facilities.
    • Make sure big, long lasting projects like Trolley Stations, bridges, major arterial roadways, interchanges, roundabouts, and dedicated bike paths are fully realized with robust facilities for bikes and other alternative transportation choices, when these projects are undertaken.
    • Implement a trolley (or 'people mover') to the airport which will profoundly reduce vehicle miles driven on all our roadways; reducing traffic, pollution, noise and stress in our neighborhoods. This goal is a game changer, yielding incredible gains toward CAP goals of reducing GHG's.
    • Include better coordination of transit schedules so Amtrak, Coaster, Trolley and MTS buses actually work together to achieve reliable, efficient transport of riders.

    If you're going to do a job, do it right.