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    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2009 edited
     
    Does anybody here ride with a GPS or smartphone? If so:

    1) What type do you use, and does it do what you want it to do?
    3) What is your primary use for it - navigation, logging, exercise, routing, or?
    2) How do you mount it?

    This thread is also to be used for discussing cycling suitable smartphone apps for navigation, exercise or recording rides, such as Cyclemeter, Strada, MapMyRide, CycleTracker, etc.

    I ride with a GPS and a smartphone, and really like the way you can record your ride and upload it to the internet, for example to Google Maps and Google Earth.

    I got my GPS when commercial GPS units first came out after the "Selective Availability" (a system where non-military users were offered a degraded signal, only) was discontinued in 2000. So mine, an Etrex Legend from Garmin, has been on the market for some eight or ten years now. It is classified as a "hiking" unit and is therefore compact. It runs on AA batteries (rechargeable or Alkaline). I don't use it for navigation much (mainly logging) - the screen is small and monochromatic black, so it is very hard to read outdoors while riding (for my eyes!).

    I didn't like the Garmin handlebar mount, and got a RAM mount instead: RAM has a modular system of mounts, so if you change units, you don't need to purchase more than a minimum of new components to fit your new (or second) unit.

    Here are some photos of my GPS setup

    Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

    The one thing I wish it was capable of was auto-routing as well as a better system for uploading routes. I am thinking of replacing it with a Legend HCX which has those capabilities, and also has a much better color screen.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2009
     
    I'll post more later, but I have ridden with a GPS, but can't get it to sync to the computer, so haven't lately.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2009
     
    Garmin Nuvi(255?). Look up the specs and capabilities. If it's a candidate, I'll loan you mine so you can check it out. I have the Ram system also, so you can click and go!.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2009 edited
     
    Hans:Garmin Nuvi(255?). Look up the specs and capabilities. If it's a candidate, I'll loan you mine so you can check it out. I have the Ram system also, so you can click and go!.
    I'll have look at the Nuvi 255 (?): I have Nuvi 650 (for the car), but I have found its battery life to be insufficient for out-of-car use.

    THanks for your offer - I will talk to you next time I see you!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2009 edited
     
    A few months ago I got a Garmin Edge 705 after not having a bike computer for a few years. It's a real bike computer with all the bells and whistles -- barometric altimeter, HRM, cadence etc. -- even supports PowerTap if you have one (I don't) -- plus a GPS. The included maps suck. There are a whole lot of roads not on it. I finally broke down and spent the extra $$$ for the detailed maps and installed them last week. I have figured out how to post ride data to the web site but I'm still not good at using the GPS portion to find things and do routing etc.

    I've had some occasional problems with anomalous readings like 227bpm heart rate or riding 72mph on PCH. The 72mph was caused by my wheel sensor shifting so that the magnet was hitting it. I think maybe the HR problem was bad skin contact. Most of the time it doesn't have those problems but it's annoying when it does.

    Before considering one, I highly recommend spending some time reading through Garmin's 705 forum.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2009
     
    Garmin Forerunner 305. Worn on the wrist like a large watch. Used as a bike computer/heart rate monitor and for logging but not for mapping/directions. Plays nice with linux and web interface.
    It was good to have for the computer functions and for logging while touring, but keeping it charged while camping was a hassle. There are some new attachments for charging off dynamo hubs and solar options are getting better-- maybe in a few years it will be more viable. The new Garmin 310 has much longer battery life than my 305 which is probably why it was cheap from Costco.com. They have deals on the 705 with all the bike attachments, too.

    Billd-- I've also gotten those weird 220 plus hrm readings on my garmin but they all happened in about the same place-- I think it was probably some kind of electronic interference.
    • CommentAuthorSJordan72
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2009 edited
     
    I know we don't all have iPhones but there are several good applications for cyclists. BikeYourDrive is free from REI. It gives current speed, average speed, time of trip, trip map, and distance. It also calculates your carbon offset for the ride. There are also several available for purchase.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2009
     
    My work just bought me an Android phone. I was thinking that it would make a pretty nice bike GPS. I wish it could be mounted on the handle bars and support ANT+ sport devices like wheel/cadence sensors and HRM. It could completely replace the 705.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2009
     
    billd: It could completely replace the 705.

    I guess that is one of the reasons why Garmin's shares are down 75% the last two years...

    billd:I wish it could be mounted on the handle bars

    The aforementioned RAM Mounts carry cradles for a wide variety of devices: Once you have identified the correct RAM cradle for your phone, you would combine it with other RAM module components to create a handlebar mount similar to mine pictured above.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2009
     
    I have the Garmin Edge 305 mounted in between my aerobars. I've been very happy with it so far. More info than I could ever need but fortunately you can customize the display to only show what you want. It's nice for downloading and logging the long rides afterwards.

    I also get the occasional weird HR reading. Especially when it's cold, even when contact is good, going downhill heart rate sometimes couples with speed. I've hit 230bpm going down Torrey Pines hill even though I was just rolling. But overall pretty reliable and fun to use.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2010 edited
     
    so for Christmas i got a Garmin Edge 605 which mounts to handlebars. i figured it would be nice to have when im off road touring.

    boy was i wrong, now that i've used i can't believe i ever lived without it (Sigurd warned this would happen). i can find other peoples rides in the internet, load them to my GPS and then go do the ride without concern for getting lost both on and off road. not only that but i can load someone else's (or even my own) ride into the computer and in real time i can be competing against them on the screen.

    this is by far the best way to venture out to learn new trails or road bike rides. usually when you go to learn a new route you need someone who's done it to show you around. that or do a lot of homework with maps. guide books mean nothing for off road since they can't tell you when and where to turn. same goes for riding the city. sure, you do homework, map out a route, then try to ride with your turn by turn directions but it's a lot of effort and for your entire ride you are looking at your sheet of info constantly worried that you missed a turn or something. anyway, im a overnight fan and i highly recommend everyone gets one. in fact, i'll start to carry them in the store. just way too useful not to have if you're kicking around the idea.


  1.  
    i know the posts are a little old, but i noticed cecil has a forerunner 305.
    i found one a couple years ago and it doesn't have the charger/cradle.
    when i found it i was gonna buy the cradle for it so i could charge it, but at the time i couldn't spend the $20.
    i was cleaning out my closet the other day and found it in there with my hiking stuff. now i can afford the charger cradle, but to be honest i don't know if the battery is dead or if the watch is broken.
    just wondering if cecil sees this or anyone else with the forerunner 305 can let me borrow their charger for a few mins to see if the thing is broke or just a dead battery.
    rather not waste the $20 if the watch is broken.
    thanks in advance
  2.  
    I received my Edge 305 hr a little over a week ago, and I second the opinon that now that I have it, I can't believe that I ever lived without it.
    The immediate stats are amazing. I love to geek out on this stuff. Makes my old write-in training diary obsolete.
    I now want to go ride every mountain bike trail in SD to get my stats.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2010 edited
     
    Do you guys with the Edge have a feel for if the stock Garmin handlebar mount is strong enough to stand up to regular and long term use and abuse?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2010
     
    so far so good but if there was a stronger more substantial mount i would go that route. it scares me a little bit.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2010
     
    here's what it looks like

  3.  
    So last night I was leaving from work to commute home and I couldn't get my Edge 305 to turn on. I have had it exactly one week. To say I was pissed on my entire ride home is an understatement.
    Through searching the interwebs I found out that there is a soft re-boot for the Garmin GPS's. While your GPS is plugged into a power source (outlet or computer) Hold the rest and mode button for 10 seconds. It should bring it back to life. It worked on mine and it worked fine this morning. Seems to be a common glitch, that occurs when unplugging it from recharging. If it happns more than a couple times Garmin says to send it in. This should be a few and far between occurrence.
    :face-smile:
  4.  
    ive had a garmin for a month or so and still can figure out how it works. not excited.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2010 edited
     
    Brian, i had to get a expert to help me with the setup at first. it's so rad once you get it working.

    for anyone that goes off road you need to check out www.geoladders.com.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2010
     
    @surfer mike-- I have the USB cradle and the plugin adapter. I'm in South Park. Just email me at the address on my account and I can meet you somewhere around here and you can try and charge up.
    • CommentAuthorPraxis
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2010
     
    I use my iPhone, just for fun for logging. I used to have a computer, but didn't bother putting it back on after I took it off for some maintenance. It's not like I can't figure out about how fast I'm going at the moment. I actually keep the phone in my bag as I don't really need to know where I am for my normal commute.

    I also now have it set up to send position updates to Twitter so concerned partied (i.e. wife) can figure out if/when I'm getting home (usually used for timing dinner).
  5.  
    <blockquote><cite> Velo Cult:</cite>

    for anyone that goes off road you need to check out www.geoladders.com.</blockquote>

    Geoladders is for road biking as well. :face-smile:
    In the upper right hand screen of geoladders there is a pull down menu where you change it to road riding, running, climbing etc. You have to do this everytime you log in.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2010
     
    I've had my Edge 305 for just over two years now. I love that thing! Other than the occasional HRM malfunction in cold weather it works flawlessly.

    One of the two holders that came with it did break partially. It consists of two parts and one of the loops for the cable ties of the inner segment broke. Still holds nicely on my commuter and I secured it with a little superglue. But I probably would not use it on my mountain bike anymore. You can get a spare fairly cheap and I don't thin it is any less robust/stable than the majority of regular bike computer mounts.

    Oh yes, and one other thing broke. The little rubber flap over the USB connector tore off. It still fits in but will probably fall out some time during a ride. Contacted Garmin about a replacement but they did not stock it. Said to try again later. Fortunately rain is not that big of a factor here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2010
     
    RAM Mounts make the most solid mounts for portable electronics (the handlebar version for the Garmin Etrex line pictured above). I checked their web site, however, and they appear not offer a Garmin Edge version, presumably because Garmin offers the Edge handlebar mount "in the box".

    The Garmin handlebar mount for Etrex is ridiculously flimsy, and the RAM mount a "must" for it, IMO, at least for bumpy rides, and I wish RAM would also offer a cradle for the Edge for those wanting to use it for rough conditions: Those Zip-ties in VC's photo don's give me much confidence in durability - but I may be wrong...
    •  
      CommentAuthorRBjay
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     
    I have the Garmin Forerunner 305 and have had nothing but problems with it. I'll soon be sending it back for a refund. I found that the best way to reap the benefits of GPS, is to ride with someone who has it. Then you can just ask him what the gradient is, or how far we've travelled, etc. A buddy of mine has the 705, but spends 50% of his awareness on the gizmo that he totally misses the reality of the moment, but he sure generates some really cool data points of the ride of which he then emails them to me -- for free! :face-devil-grin:
    • CommentAuthorTom@VC
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     
    Looks like Garmin has a $50 rebate on a couple of models right now until March 1st.
    I have a distributor who carries them if anyone is thinking about picking one up (not a shameless shop plug, I only know because I'm looking into one also :face-smile:)
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     
    Tom@VC:Looks like Garmin has a $50 rebate on a couple of models right now until March 1st.
    Do you know which models are rebated, Tom (or do you have a link)?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     
    here's the Garmin link.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     
    Velo Cult:Here's the Garmin link.
    The Edge 605 and 705 - perfect for cycling!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2010 edited
     
    I may have mentioned this before, but I recently replaced my 10 year old GPS: With aging technology, the old screen was too small and dark, and backlight too weak, for my aging eyes, and I could not really use if for anything but recording rides (that those of you who have ridden with me have seen the output of in the form of Google Maps tracklog overlays). My new GPS, although its features and footprint are essentially similar to the old one, has a much brighter color screen, with better resolution.

    I have been trying to figure out how to design a ride on the PC and then to upload it to the GPS for turn by turn directions, and after many dead ends I think I have it pretty much figured out. Seeing as there are others here using GPS, I figured I share my findings here. As background, my comments apply to a Garmin Etrex Legend HCx - other manufacturers and models may have a different methodology to achieve PC-to-GPS routing.

    Most importantly, I have found a site that allows me to pre-design a ride - Bikely: It is easy to work with, and is forgiving if you make mistakes and need to re-edit. It is free, but registration is required. I made a test ride that you can see here (practicing on this weekend's Superbowl Ride!).

    Once you have created the ride, you export it to a GPX file (a de facto file standard for GPS devices) and upload it to the GPS using software that came with the GPS (e.g., for Garmin products "Mapsource"), or better yet, EasyGPS, a free download. The ride will now appear as one of the tracks in your GPS, that you can select and choose to "navigate", with a line overlaid on the map showing the turn by turn directions for your ride. In a similar fashion as described above, if you have created a track by riding it and saved it, you can also use it to navigate by next time you want to make that ride. My unit can save 20 "tracks" onboard, or "rides". You can keep additional ones on the PC, of course, and just upload them to the GPS when needed.

    If you want me to email you my GPX file so that you can just test the above procedure on your GPS to make sure everything works before you design your own, pleas let me know and I will email a sample file.


    I will no doubt have gained further knowledge (and undoubtedly, a few more questions, too!) once I have actually tried to use the GPS to guide me on a ride!

    PS! I just noticed that our own Ray333, Protorio, and Stephan all have Bikely accounts with rides posted!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2010
     
    thanks, i signed up for Bikely just now. i'll give it a try soon.
  6.  
    I also have a ride posted on bikely. It was the "Northern Bypass" route that we rode some time ago from North Park to La Mesa. I don't remember what I used as a login, probably my name like here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMikeBike
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2010 edited
     
    I have a Garmin Forerunner 305, a wristwatch style GPS that I had left over from my marathon training days. I mounted it on my handlebars using a Garmin mount for the Forerunner 50, but the 305 seems to fit just fine. I have the HRM and cadence kit on my bike as well.

    I upload my rides to http://MapMyRide.com . I will occasionally plan out a ride on an unfamiliar route by mapping it out on http://gmap-pedometer.com , saving and importing it into MapMyRide, then exporting from MapMyRide to the Garmin software (which unfortunately is the only way to upload routes to the watch without using the Garmin software for everything, but it really is one of the worst bits of software I've ever seen). Not to mention that the 305 screen doesn't give you a good map for those routes, just a black line on an otherwise blank screen.

    That Edge 605 is making me drool.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2010
     
    mike_ballard:I also have a ride posted on bikely.
    I looked for others, too, but with dozens of pages full of SD rides, I couldn't check more than a handful: Too bad Bikely does not allow for search by member.

    MikeBike:I upload my rides to http://MapMyRide.com.
    I don't know how anybody can stand that site: The amount of advertising is absolutely overwhelming, but the deal-breaker is that giant annoying floating banner ad right on top of the map!

    MikeBike:I will occasionally plan out a ride on an unfamiliar route by mapping it out on http://gmap-pedometer.com
    I didn't know about that one, have tried it and I love the user interface! Just wish the GPX conversion procedure was less clunky.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMikeBike
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2010
     
    Njord Noatun:I don't know how anybody can stand that site: The amount of advertising is absolutely overwhelming, but the deal-breaker is that giant annoying floating banner ad right on top of the map!
    I ended up buying a 'Bronze' membership ($30/year...ugh), mostly to have access to some training plans, but a bonus was that it got rid of the ad banner on the map.

    Njord Noatun: I didn't know about that one, have tried it and I love the user interface! Just wish the GPX conversion procedure was less clunky.
    What's nice about using gmap-pedometer and MapMyRide together is that you can save a gmap-pedometer map (there's a Save link on the left) which gives you a URL like http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=1234567. MapMyRide will import using the last part of the URL (e.g., 1234567) to create a map based on whatever you made with gmap-pedometer. MapMyRide can then export to the Garmin software by saving the route as a .crs file.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2010
     
    MikeBike: MapMyRide can then export to the Garmin software by saving the route as a .crs file.
    Interesting - so the Edge does not read GPX files - instead it wants CRS files?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMikeBike
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2010
     
    I'm not sure about the Edge, I have a Forerunner 305 -- but they're both Garmin so I assume the requirements would be the same.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2010
     
    I gatherthat the CRS file, unlike a GPX file, also contains heart rate info (and other exercise related info): I think you are right in saying that both the Forerunner and Edge are using the CRS format, which may be what is needed to use Garmin Connect.

    What I don't know, though, is if Garmin's exercise units (Edge, Forerunner, etc.) refuse to accept GPX files altogether or if they can read them (albeit with reduced functionality).
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2010
     
    I've found Garmin Connect to be less annoying than MapMyRide with the same functionality.
    GPS Visualizer is also a useful site for converting formats: http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/convert_input.
    To convert a gpx to upload to your Garmin device, try this site: http://www.gpsies.com/createTrack.do
    Windows users can use the Garmin Communicator plugin for two-way communication between your device and computer.
    Because I use linux, I can't use the Communicator plugin or the software that came with my Garmin, but there are many open source tools available that do all the same things. I use a command-line tool called Garmin Sync.
    There are also a number of open-source programs that replace the software, including MyTourbook, Turtle Sport, and BikeXperience.
    AFAIK, the gpx file also contains the HRM info. I use a wordpress plugin to display gpx information, including the HRM on my blog: http://www.matusz.ch/blog/projekte/xml-google-maps-wordpress-plugin/
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2010
     
    I used my new GPS for the first time in a "real life" situation to guide me through the twists and turns of the eastern, northern and eastern edges of the Uptown "mesa" in the "Superbowl Ride" this Sunday (track here): The performance exceeded my expectations. The screen was nice and bright without use of any backlight, the track was conspicuous enough that I could see my turns just from a very quick glance down, and I was alerted by an audible (and screen) signal well ahead of every turn: Think about it as a virtual dynamic clue sheet with as many clue points as you would ever need, and without the need to battle a crumply paper in your handlebar bag pocket.

    The route was created on Bikely.com, and then uploaded to the unit. I have since experimented with the reverse - how to get a track off of Google Maps/Earth (which do not offer an "export" function) and onto the computer and ultimately onto the GPS as a track. This, too, works for me now - I took Beany's proposed Google Map route for this weekend's "Farm" ride and uploaded it to my GPS ready for turn-by-turn directions.

    Battery life is nominally 25 hrs (2 x AA batteries, alkaline or regarchargeable) so with a few spare batteries and/or a charger (solar, 12V DC or 110V AC) one could easily navigate a full tour with one.

    Getting up to speed on this can be a little time-consuming, but once you've got the process down, it's awesome!
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2010
     
    I have since experimented with the reverse - how to get a track off of Google Maps/Earth (which do not offer an "export" function) and onto the computer and ultimately onto the GPS as a track. This, too, works for me now - I took Beany's proposed Google Map route for this weekend's "Farm" ride and uploaded it to my GPS ready for turn-by-turn directions.



    This site converts Google Maps to gpx: http://www.elsewhere.org/journal/gmaptogpx/
    • CommentAuthorCorona
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2010
     
    I use my iphone with the "trails" app. I can upload the info to trailrunner. usually i just toss the phone in my pocket or whatever. but I dont do very long rides. I mostly use it out of curiosity, boredom, just to know how much i've ridden.

    KC
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2010
     
    My husband got a gps usb dongle today for development purposes so I get to play around with it and test to see if it works. :face-smile:

    lsusb yields this:
    Bus 003 Device 003: ID 067b:2303 Prolific Technology, Inc. PL2303 Serial Port

    I just apt-got gpsd.

    Now I'm going to figure out how to actually use this thing.
    • CommentAuthorjacobk
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2010
     
    beany:
    lsusb yields this:
    Bus 003 Device 003: ID 067b:2303 Prolific Technology, Inc. PL2303 Serial Port

    I just apt-got gpsd.

    Nice to see some fellow linux geekery! gpsbabel rules for waypoint management, haven't done much track/routing stuff yet though.

    What are you going to be using that gps receiver for?
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2010 edited
     
    ^ Excellent. Linux + GPS + Bike = win. There are a couple of GUIs for gpsbabel if you get tired of the command-line. Gebabble works pretty well for me. Also, BikeXperience is good for if you like to keep logs (@Jackobk-- it also has a "sprockets calculator" -- everything is apparently translated from German) Have fun.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2010
     
    beany:My husband got a gps usb dongle.
    Seems like this partiular product is a receiver only, and needs to be hooked up to a computer in order to do anything "useful": So it doesn't really seem to be that useful for bicycling use -- or have I missed something?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2010 edited
     
    I rode the "Rollers to Bonsall" brevet arranged by the San Diego Randonneurs yesterday.

    I would describe the route as "complex" - the cue sheet completely filled two 8.5x11" pages and contained about 70 street turns: To boot, I was unfamiliar with most of the northbound route. Not being particularly good at following written instructions, I was happy to find that the arranger had also provided an online map of the route: This meant that I could download the entire route to my GPS, saving me from relying of cues on paper.

    It worked out exceptionally well: On the GPS display, my course is red, "I" am a black dot, and control posts are a blue flag: Never did I have to worry about navigation - all I needed to concentrate on was the riding. The fact that I always knew my exact location and never needed to worry if I was off course or had missed a control point gave me the confidence to complete a challenging ride.

    Any cyclometer can to this, of course, but added bonuses are that you always have your distance, average speed and time (and all kinds of other data) at your fingertips so that you know how you pace yourself.

    In short, I cannot recommend a GPS warmly enough for this kind of riding.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 13th 2010 edited
     
    I always thought it'd be a good idea to have bike shops listed as waypoints in my GPS for on the road emergency repairs and parts. But I could not figure out for the longest time exactly how to quickly and simply harvest bike shop locations in a format that could be uploaded to the GPS.

    Well, I have now figured that out and have about 100 bike shops in San Diego City and coastal North County in my GPS (will add more shops in north-east and east county in due course): Wherever I am, my GPS will list bike shops by proximity and by name and guide me, turn by turn, to any of them. The bike shops are also marked on the map with a little blue and white "X" and name so that I can visualize them when I am nearby: It should work out great!

    I'd be happy to share this GPX file (here is the Google Maps equivalent - it's not perfect, but better than nothing) with anyone here who wants it for their GPS or computer mapping software (email or PM). Please note that not all GPS units accept GPX formatted files, but most do.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2010
     
    These GPS' are cool and useful but isn't getting lost once and awhile sorta half the fun when riding your bike?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2010
     
    It can be fun to a point, and in that case you can just choose not to look at the maps. At some point being lost can become a real problem. I haven't found that having a GPS causes me to explore less.