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      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2011
     
    Went exploring Sycamore Canyon/Martha's Grove with AlanKHG, BevCurly, and others this weekend. Alan moved to NYC the following morning (after selling his Leader single-speed at El Zarape's when we stopped for tacos that night). Talk about wanting to maximize his SoCal riding time! Amazing what these single-speed riders can do, both street and off-road.
    I really want to get hooked up with GeoLadders!


    (this lower ridge of rocks is where I was launched)

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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2011
     
    Sycamore Canyon is fun. I broke my collar bone there 3 years back on Martha's.
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      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2011
     
    Velo Cult:Sycamore Canyon is fun. I broke my collar bone there 3 years back on Martha's.

    Ouch. Probably right where the pictures were taken, and I was launched, right? Although plenty of bone breaking places to choose from that creep up on you if you're haulin' butt.
    Today would be beautiful, with the little bit of "dust-control" that came down from the clouds this morning.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2011
     
    I busted myself a little down the trail from there. It's a hard trail because every time you do it the trail changes. The trail maintenance and new ruts chance seriously every time. It's a loosing battle with erosion control on that one.

    That trail is fantastic with tacky soil. Great place to ride in the winter months.
  1.  
    I wouldn't mind exploring some local trails with a group. Let me know the next time you do it.

    I spoke to AlanKHG last TdF and he told me that he's moving to NYC in less than 2 weeks....
    • CommentAuthorgavilan
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2011
     
    Ehem... just thought I'd post up some mad props for McLovin who participated on the final race of the Southridge USA series this last weekend and got first place in the Beginner's group for the Super D and a very respectable 7th out of about 15 for the DH -which could have been a podium if not for some unfortunate crashes (and, as was told, he still beat over half of his group!).

    This is the first time he's raced, did fantastic the whole weekend and I am sure will snag that DH podium in the next ones. Go Chip!

    DH
    • CommentAuthorAn.dy
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2011
     
    Heading out to MTRP for a Spring - Sycamore lap after work tomorrow if anyone is interested in lap at about 4:30 let me know (I'll be parking off Mast Blvd.)

    Cheers!
    • CommentAuthorMcLovin
    • CommentTimeNov 3rd 2011
     
    gavilan:Ehem... just thought I'd post up some mad props for McLovin who participated on the final race of the Southridge USA series this last weekend and got first place in the Beginner's group for the Super D and a very respectable 7th out of about 15 for the DH -which could have been a podium if not for some unfortunate crashes (and, as was told, he still beat over half of his group!).

    This is the first time he's raced, did fantastic the whole weekend and I am sure will snag that DH podium in the next ones. Go Chip!

    DH


    Aww thank you, I just saw this. :face-monkey:
    • CommentAuthorAn.dy
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2012 edited
     
    Crestridge is a new(ish) mtb spot just east of El Cajon. If you haven't been there, I'd definitely encourage it! Fun, diverse single track snaking throughout the preserve. There is trail work put on monthly by the folks at SDMBA, there's tons of potential for the area and the climate is right for it to happen. Here's a video of the area and some music by Van Halen...
    • CommentAuthorFitz
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2012
     
    I've been in SD a few years now and it's time to pull the mountain bike off the hook to explore some trails. What do you all recommend for something relatively close to the coast (I'm in Crown Point/PB) for a rusty mountain biker? Any trails I should target in Mission Trails Reg. Park to get my skills back up? Thanks!
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2012
     
    The so-called tri-canyon area is closest probably to you - that being the trails in Rose and San Clemente Canyons. There are various places to pick up the trails but if you ride up Santa Fe past the breweries you can cross the tracks in a couple places and pick up the trails on the other side. Having a look on the google maps beforehand will give you an idea.

    As far as Mission Trails goes my routine is to take the river crossing off the visitor's loop trail, then go up the steep gravel road and follow signs to Suycott wash and Portobello - basically continue going uphill. I then ride down E-ticket and I think Suycott wash or whatever the fun singletrack is that ends at the park bench, followed by a steep climb up the S-curves and then back down the gravel road to the river xing. There's lots of stuff to be had if you take the grassland xing too, and go under 52, but at some point you ride onto Miramar base property going that way and if they are out patrolling and catch you on Marine land it won't be a pleasant experience. I need someone to show me the goods in that area...

    Don't forget to check out Sycamore Canyon also. The best resource for mountain biking around here is Mountain Bike Bill's website.
    • CommentAuthorFitz
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2012
     
    Thanks JSnook!
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2012
     
    Malcolm's first Descent of the first ramp on Hellion at Highland Park (age 4 yrs).

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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2012
     
    ^^ love it! "o yeah, ooo yeaaaah! i got this!"
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2013
     
    A fun video from Lyttelton Urban Downhill in NZ:

    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    If you didn't make it out to Tiger! Tiger! last night to watch the premiere of the documentary "Singletrack High" - you really really missed out.



    I even got a little teary eyed at many points. It was well made and a great intro to the NorCal and SoCal MTB high school racing scene.

    Also...BikeSD is aiming to have the most comprehensive bike calendar in the San Diego region (where the movie showing was listed). Events are listed on the main page. Email all events to calendar@bikesd.org where we have two kickass volunteers maintaining the calendar on a regular basis. If it is pedal powered related - it is welcome.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeMay 24th 2013
     
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2013
     
    Say hello to my new friend, a 1984 Schwinn High Sierra:

    Untitled
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013 edited
     
    Thanks to eager encouragement and steadfast support (points for alliteration?) from Shady John, Svelocity and MFutch, I am now a new owner of my first ever mountain bike, a 1986 Stumpjumper Sport.

    Some day this guy will conquer Catalina island. In the mean time, it is so much fun just riding it!

    Now to find some racks for it.

    • CommentAuthorjacobk
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    mfutch:Say hello to my new friend, a 1984 Schwinn High Sierra:

    Untitled
    Sigurd:Thanks to eager encouragement and steadfast support (points for alliteration?) from Shady John, Svelocity and MFutch, I am now a new owner of my first ever mountain bike, a 1986 Stumpjumper Sport.

    Some day this guy will conquer Catalina island. In the mean time, it is so much fun just riding it!

    Now to find some racks for it.




    Great stuff! I've really come to love early mtbs for their all-rounder versatility.

    My main ride over the last half year or so has been my '85 Schwinn Cimarron. Fillet brazed at the headtube and lugged at the back, Deore XT deerhead components. I ended up swapping out the 175 XT/600 triple cranks for a later 170mm Deore II set since I was getting some knee pain on rides longer than 20-30 miles or so. The newer cranks also have Biopace HP rings (which are much rounder than the earlier elliptical versions), but I think it was primarily the shorter length that helped eliminate the knee pain right away.



    It even has low-rider mounts on the front fork. The geometry on these early mtbs is kind of strange with super slack angles. The Cimarron is 70/70 but I think the early stumpjumpers had angles as low as 68. Mine seemed to actually handle a little better with some weight in the front panniers.





    For a while, you were able to find early mtbs for dirt cheap on craigslist but it seems like they've been going up in value recently as people have begun to appreciate them more.
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      CommentAuthorSmorg
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2013
     
    Lovely machines! :oD I do have a soft spot for rigid mountain bikes. Hardly ever seem them on the street (or off) anymore!
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    Looking good Sigurd! And great Cimarron jacobk! Here is the High Sierra all racked out:

    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    Well, this is neat: http://www.catalinagis.org/bike
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2013
     
    Futch, Jacob - awesome rigs!
    @ Smorg: Yes - so very versatile!

    mfutch:Well, this is neat: http://www.catalinagis.org/bike
    Wow - that is absolutely fantastic; thanks for posting.

    A group of people I know (and whom Shady knows, too, I think) does this group ride/race on Catalina annually: They do something like 70miles/7,000' in a day.

    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2014
     
    Shady, I think you'll enjoy this...

    http://mbaesthetic.tumblr.com/
  2.  
    So many anodized parts, the wild paint schemes, the rigid forks, the imaginative cantilever brake hangers...thanks for posting that mfutch!
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2014 edited
     
    A couple of my favorites, both from 1990:

    Merlin

    313

    Colnago Arabesque

    008

    010

    012
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2014
     
    Love those bikes Hmeins
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2014
     
    I took part in my first ever bike race of any kind last night, the Quick N Dirty MTB summer race series. It was a blast! I rode in the men's beginner category and started at the back of the pack. We did four 2.3 mile loops. I felt like I was working the hardest on the first lap, but it was actually my slowest because of the start/stop that happens with a big pack. Next time I think I'll try to start a little further up in the pack. After the race I won a nice Giant floor pump and a set of MTB tires in the raffle. Good times!
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      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2014
     
    Nice job Futch!
  3.  
    That QnD looks like a lot of fun!

    There are definitely more advantages when you are closer to the front of the pack before a mass start.
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2014
     
    mfutch:I took part in my first ever bike race of any kind last night, the Quick N Dirty MTB summer race series.
    I read through the race rules and there was nothing about what type of bikes are required in order to part take: Are drop bars or CX bikes allowed, then? Just curious.
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2014
     
    I didn't see any cross bikes or drop bars out there yesterday, but the course isn't so technical so they would be fine. There might be a bit of portaging in the sand pit and the rock garden, but otherwise they would be fine. I ended up portaging the rock garden on every lap because I never got a clean shot at it. There was always someone stuck in there.
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      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2014
     
    Most of the course is the same as the Lake Hodges CX race. Get off and run!
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2014
     
    mfutch:I didn't see any cross bikes or drop bars out there yesterday...
    I was thinking you were using your Rock Combo - but obviously, you didn't.
  4.  
    Peter Sagan is a very well rounded racer.

    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2014
     
    From Wikipedia:

    Liquigas' Zanatta offered Sagan a two-year contract (2010–2011) with an option to ride mountain bikes for Cannondale. In April 2010 the contract was extended to 2012. Liquigas doctors and managers were stunned by results of Sagan's medical tests, saying that they had never seen a 19-year-old rider as physically strong and capable. During the training camp Sagan destroyed more mountain bikes than any other rider due to his ability to put a bike through its paces. This earned him the nickname "Terminator."
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2014
     
    Pic from Quick N Dirty MTB race:
  5.  
    Great shot. I know where that is. If I get off work early I will watch tonight's QnD race at Lake Hodges
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2014
     
    I spent a week in Crested Butte, CO - a small town in the mountains and a one of the birthplaces of mountain biking. I've been going up there since I was a kid when my dad worked up there in the summers, but this was the first time going with a mountain bike. I had mountain biked around town a bit as a kid, but never the real trails. Wow. The final day I rode the 401 trail which is always mentioned as one of the best MTB trails in the world. Miles of smooth singletrack through wildflowers and aspen groves with enough rocks, roots, and switchbacks to keep you from just staring at the incredible views.

    Untitled

    Full album here:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/24165333@N06/sets/72157645176640980
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2014
     
    Ya know, mfutch, many social media platforms have a LIKE button. For your Crested Butte post they would need an AWESOME INCREDIBLE AMAZING button.
  6.  
    Mfutch, welcome to the dark side!
  7.  
    Fun article from Collectors Weekly:

    The Hippie Daredevils Who Were Just Crazy Enough to Invent Mountain Biking
    By Ben Marks
    September 9th, 2014
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014
     
    In the '70s we used Schwinn beach cruisers and called the sport "clunking."
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014
     
    1980 Pearl Pass Tour Part 1


    Part 2


    I love Gary Fisher's Mt. Tam jersey.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014
     
    Thanks for posting that Mfutch. It's like watching people barnstorming in WWI biplanes---can't believe they could even ride those bikes off road. Even 6-7 years later the equipment had evolved considerably. And the name "klunker" had pretty much died away.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2014 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2014
     
    Interesting video, but I think it's somewhat irresponsible to descend at that speed with inadequate brakes--the life you take might not be your own. Also, I was under the impression that the Repack Trail was now off limits to bikes. Clearly that trail gets ridden regularly, though. A quick google search turns up conflicting information. If it's considered a road, and not single track, then possibly it is currently legal.

    http://bayarearides.com/rides/repack/

    http://www.singletracks.com/blog/mtb-trails/visiting-the-birthplace-of-mountain-biking-marin-county-california/
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2014
     
    We were riding "klunkers" down here in 1974, concurrent with our invention of BMX freestyle using Schwinn Sting Rays. This Saturday at my 40th La Jolla High School reunion I'll be seeing Reid Arnesen, fellow klunker and Sting Ray rider and wheelie king of the UCSD campus where most of our adventures took place. He could bust a wheelie from one end of Revelle Plaza to the other.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2014 edited
     
    HMeins, I'm a bit younger than you, but I also got my start on a Schwinn Stingray, in my case a 1970 model just like this one (except blue):



    Around 1974, my friend helped me modify the bike with heavy duty rims, wide knobbies front and rear, wider and lower handlebars and a smaller front sprocket. Of course we ditched the fenders and the chainguard. The smaller sprocket, combined with the banana seat and lack of any handbrakes, made this a wheelie machine. I could wheelie the entire length of the playground at my elementary school over ten times in a row, and I could spin the handlebars around while riding a wheelie. I could ride down endless flights of stairs, and I also learned how to sit on the handlebars and pedal the bike while facing backwards, but that was pretty much the extent of my flatlanding. Coaster brakes probably didn't help. At some point, my friend got an Ashtabula with nylon rims, and then everybody started serious jumping (with concomitant breaking of limbs), and I drifted off and got a 1977 Nishiki Olympic road bike, and also started riding skateboards.

    It's funny but I have never been able to wheelie more than about ten feet on any bike other than my old Stingray, which I gave to Goodwill, along with a box of parts, sometime around 1996--what a mistake that was. A couple years ago I bought a used Specialized Hemi CrMo and fitted it with a small sprocket and a layback seatpost, yet even while wearing soccer shinguards to protect my shins from spinning pedals, I couldn't ride much of a wheelie. Whenever I see old Stingrays on Craigslist I feel a hankering to buy one just to see if I could again ride a wheelie, but have so far resisted.