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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2015
     
    I've had this bike for a few 1000 miles, with a granny of 30T. Switched to a 24T,

    While I was able to climb everything around here, I had the idea that I would climb better at 60rpm than 40 :-)

    This was a bit complex to pull off:





    I used a N-Gear Jump Stop Chain Guide/Watcher and added 1mm spacers to move the 24t Sugino ring away from the middle cog (chain was rubbing on that). I setup the front derailleur to just clear the big ring.

    The result was climbs that felt easier even at the same HR and some nice results (for a Clydesdale class rider):

    https://www.strava.com/activities/324855177

    Rarely have to use the lowest low now, but it's nice to have for the really steep stuff.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2015
     
    New human powered world speed record (not drafting, flat road)



    Cyclist reaches 85.71 mph on way to human-powered speed world record

    Aboard an enclosed recumbent bicycle in Nevada today, Canadian Todd Reichart has claimed the world record for human powered speed. The annual World Human Powered Speed Challenge draws cyclists from around the world seeking to push the limits of pedal-powered motion, but it was the 33-year-old who left the competition in his wake to clock a top speed of 85.71 mph (137.9 km/h).

    http://www.gizmag.com/cyclist-human-powered-speed-record/39472/
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2015
     
    I'm curious what kind of gearing allows them to go from zero (presumably) to 86mph.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2015 edited
     
    Sigurd:I'm curious what kind of gearing allows them to go from zero (presumably) to 86mph.


    I don't know about that machine, but I've seen the inner workings of a Varna up close (first machine to break 75mph). Two isolated chains, front wheel drive. So you get a double step up.



    Video of one of the first run that broke 85mph:


    (drivetrain at 1:16)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2015
     
    They ended up breaking 86mph.

    Details on the transmission:

    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2015
     
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2015
     
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2016
     
    not mine but this is a sweet 1993 Burley Duet Tandem bike:

    http://sandiego.craigslist.org/ssd/bik/5578650879.html

    "Only one owner. Was ridden for the first 7-10 years, and then sat inside a garage since. It needs new tires, handle bar wrap, wheels might need to be trued. We can't find any paperwork to go with it, probably lost in a move. Originally came with a drum brake but it's gone, I think he took issue with its weight. Comes with a lighter weight front wheel that for some reason he didn't like and put the original wheel back on. Comes with the child seat.
    e-mail me with your offer, questions, or if you want to look at it before deciding.
    If this ad is still here it's still for sale.

    Large size(24" captain , 21" inch stroker)
    Stand-over height: 32 1/2" / 30 1/2"
    7 rear sprockets, 3 forward sprockets, for 21 speeds
    Made in the U.S.A.

    I may be slow to reply because I have things to do."
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2016
     
    Pedaling to 139.45 km/hr (86.65 mph) ... no hill, no drafting.

  1.  


    Riding the First Recumbent
    Off The Beaten Path ~ September 14, 2016
    During the mid-1930s, recumbents were quite popular among French cyclotourists. Many saw them as the bikes of the future. While the racing world outlawed recumbents soon after Francis Faure set an hour record on a recumbent in 1933, cyclotourists and randonneurs couldn’t have cared less about what the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) thought.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2016
     
    Oh now they are over 89 mph.