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  1.  
    I couldn't find a discussion open on this, perhaps there is one but I didn't get to it. I figure that we could talk about the things that ya'll do to stay healthy while bicycling moderately/heavily on a daily/weekly basis. This could mean anything from keeping muscles healthy, avoiding or controlling muscle cramps to achieving good hydration, etc. I'm relatively new to this so perhaps these things are obvious to other people but I'm still picking them up.

    I'd like to start by asking if anybody has any tips in the case of a slight knee injury. I've been commuting a lot more since school is out and I feel that my right knee is getting a little bit funny when I pedal. There's a soft crack-like sound that I can hear from time to time. I suppose it is always best to check out a doctor or something but I was just wondering if anybody has any tips as to how to avoid this or...
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2010
     
    For a "pre-existing condition" like that you really need to find out what causes it and whether or not the source of the problem can be fixed or if you need to work around it.

    Just use the bike analogy here. Was there ever a grinding noise on your bike that was a good sign?

    I too have an old knee problem from my wilder years but since I know what caused it I have been able to adjust my position and bike components accordingly. In my experience the vast majority of people have their bikes set up wrong or at least not optimized. I have spoken to a number of people during my commute who were riding a bike that was clearly too big or too small or simply had the saddle/handlebar position adjusted wrongly. So often they are totally surprised when I ask them "don't your knees/wrists/shoulders hurt?" and it is exactly what they experience.

    Bottom line, there are two people you need to get in touch with: A doctor or chiropractor and a bike fitter or honest store with experience in fine-tuning ergonomics.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2010
     
    batmick:For a "pre-existing condition" like that you really need to find out what causes it and whether or not the source of the problem can be fixed or if you need to work around it.
    Yep. I'm not aware of any doctors here. If you have a medical problem, it's best to see a professional; probably a knee specialist who can properly diagnose your specific knee problem and suggest appropriate action.

    In general, there are two things that commonly cause knee problems for bicyclists. The first is improper fit; specifically seat height. A lot of people tend to want to be able to touch the ground while sitting. This is usually way too low. You should have a very slight bend at the knee (leg almost but not quite straight) at the bottom of your down stroke while sitting on the saddle. The second thing is running gears that are too high. Pushing high gears can be very hard on the knees. Some people have no knee problems with big gears but many people do. Running lower gears at a higher cadence helps a lot of people with knee problems. It helped me. A third, less common thing is clipless pedals that don't have any float in them. Many people are fine with these provided that they are adjusted properly. However some people need pedals that have a little side-to-side play in them.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2010
     
    One thing that helps me overall is remembering to stretch. Even if I'm just going for a short ride (most of mine are), I try to stretch not just legs, but core, arms, back, etc. Yoga (when I actually do it) also helps tremendously. Issues of bike fit are important considerations, for sure, but also the healthier and more flexible your whole body is, the better your joints and muscles are going to handle daily riding (and the more daily riding will benefit you, since you won't be making unconscious compensations for pain, etc. while riding).
  2.  
    RE: all

    Very sensible comments/suggestions! Thank you for your input.

    I have been trying to remember to stretch, I do feel that it will help, and it does help, in fact.

    Seat height/bike sizing is something I had not taken into consideration, but I will definitely evaluate it further, I still need to find the time to figure out what my IDEAL frame size is, I don't know with exactitude, it sort of bothers me. I know it's somewhere between 60-63 but it does vary with the bike and the style and such.

    The pedal thing is a must, I don't use clips and my feet size do need something considerably larger, closer to platform pedals.

    Thanks you all again.

    I have decided not to see a doctor, I have been taking it easy on the knee and it has improved a lot so I think it was just a minor sprain or something.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2010
     
    Exercise question: I live at the bottom of an 850' hill (Mt. Soledad). I have been cycling it for exercise, and could also cycle it for my commute (but haven't much as there is an easier way to get around the hill [Bird Rock] for when I just want to get to work).

    There are many roads and various ways to climb the hill: You can go more or less straight up (750', 2 miles) in one go - great for training your body to deal with lactic acid buildup. But I can also break it up into "hill segments" where I climb a bit, drop a bit, climb some more, drop a bit - and so forth. If I do the latter, because of the drops, I might be climbing a bit more and go a bit farther (let's say, 1,000' and 2.5 - 3.0 miles). The latter would also be a kind of interval training, I guess.

    Repeat as needed.

    So what would be the best cycling exercise - going straight up, break it up into "hill segments" - or a combination of the two?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2010
     
    Depends on what you are trying to train that particular day. A good well rounded cyclists will do a different pace and style ride every single time they go out in a week. A week would be your micro-cycle. It would look something like this:

    Sunday - Race or race paced ride
    Monday - Easy mellow ride with not too many miles
    Tuesday -Short ride with high intensity intervals
    Wednesday -Very long ride with easy pace.
    Thursday-Faster medium paced ride
    Friday- Day off or quick easy ride around the neighborhood.
    Saturday- Race or race paced ride.

    Everybody has their own pattern for this but your answer is both. You want the long climbs to train your muscles to find a solid strong pace. You want your intervals to train your body to run at a higher heart rate and to train your body to recover quicker between intervals. In the end the Interval training will make you faster and stronger but you don't want to a high intensity interval ride more than once a week. If done right you really need to be on a trainer though because to do it right (meaning for racing) you would be going so extreme that you would likely get really light headed and it would be just too dangerous to do while riding. That's for racers though. For the average person doing it on public streets is OK. Racers need to take it to the extreme to raise their anaerobic threshold and speed up recovery. For example at my fastest on the trainer I could get my heart rate to 220 beets per minute and recover really really fast. On the road or trail I could sprint, take one pedal stroke easy and go sprint again. Your heart rate and breathing drop way down almost instantly allowing you to put in max effort again really fast. Ultimately this is what makes the fastest racers. They guy that can go all out, recover and go all out again is the fittest.
  3.  
    Powered by Nutrition

    Two Canadians rode their bikes from St. Albert, Alberta in Canada to Salt Lake City, UT for 11 days and a total of 1800 kms.

    http://networkedblogs.com/74A2h
  4.  
    Who needs EPO when you can boost your red blood cells naturally? Get'em at your nearest health food store.
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    Anyone ever experienced pain *behind* the knee? As in, the back of the knee. I don't know when I did it, but it's painful when I do a full leg extension pedaling or walking. The pain is at the back of the knee, sort of the top of the calf. Any ideas?
  5.  
    Yeah, a doctor. Ha!
  6.  
    And sorry you are having to deal with it. CCT
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2012
     
    No need for the second message of well wishes Chris, the first response was the right one!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2012
     
    mfutch:Anyone ever experienced pain *behind* the knee? As in, the back of the knee. I don't know when I did it, but it's painful when I do a full leg extension pedaling or walking. The pain is at the back of the knee, sort of the top of the calf. Any ideas?
    I had it many years ago when I had my saddle too high. It resulted in over extension of the knee. Your knee should have a very slight bend when you are at the bottom of your down stroke while seated.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2012
     
    For anyone interested in nutrition, two great articles refuting the Paleo diet nonsense and the "refuel with chocolate milk" government-funded fat and sugar promotion:

    http://www.forksoverknives.com/the-paleo-diet-is-uncivilized-and-unhealthy-and-untrue/

    http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/07/got-milk-you-dont-need-it/
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2012
     
    That's a great article. Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2012
     
    That Forks Over Knives article is thought-provoking, but it contains many distortions. "Pre-humans" from 2 million years ago are not modern humans, for example. It is well-accepted that the switch from a vegetarian diet to an omnivorous diet was one of the factors that contributed to the ascent of homo sapiens, and the Nature article that is referenced does not contradict this at all. There are also specious references to societies from 10-15K years ago as "traditional," as if the agricultural practices of these people somehow proved that humans are naturally suited to living on a maize diet, rather than the hunter-gatherer diet that their ancestors probably consumed for hundreds of thousands of years prior. The Forks over Knives article also seems to persist in blaming America's health problems on dietary fat. In fact, the American diet is loaded with empty fat AND carbs, and our epidemic of obesity/diabetes/metabolic syndrome is at least as connected to chugging sugar as it is to slurping butter. Blaming fat for all dietary ills is a 1970's concept that isn't supported by data. Eating too much of anything is not healthy. Having too much food was just not an issue for most of human evolution, and we are ill-equipped physiologically to deal with it.

    It is possible that a vegan or near-vegan diet, with a near-starvation caloric intake, can contribute to longevity, but I think the evidence is not clear. I personally doubt that a vegan diet is the best for an energetic life. I am not here to live forever; I want to be healthy and energetic and to feel good while I'm alive. I believe that a balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, a fair amount of meat, whole grains, and limited amounts of empty calories from fat/carbs is a reasonable compromise between "eating for life" and "eating to stay alive forever." In all discussions of nutrition, health, and aging, we should always remember that humans did not evolve to live long lives. The evolutionary pressure was to live well enough, i.e. secure personal safety and enough food to stay alive and raise children to the age of independence (probably around age 14-16 traditionally). So there was selection pressure to be strong, to resist infectious disease, to heal wounds, to think clearly--and to survive through reproductive age and a little bit longer. By age 55-60 max, your youngest children would be at the age of independence, and you would probably not be helping your offspring survive and prosper. In fact, you'd be lucky to live that long at all without succumbing to an accident, another predator, a skirmish with a neighboring tribe, or a bout with a killer disease. So the paleo diet argument, that the "natural" human diet would lead to greatest longevity in our current environment, also doesn't make sense to me.

    As for the argument that we should be vegetarians because this would allow us to feed more people: Great, let's continue to increase the temporary carrying capacity of the earth for humans. Maybe we can shoot for 20 billion before there's a major crop failure and die-off. I don't argue that our current system is sustainable, but feeding 80% of our caloric production to cattle (or whatever the actual number is) is no more insane than encouraging yet more human reproduction. Arguably, in our current state, if there is a major global crop failure, then we can simply slaughter all the cattle and eat the grain that we would have fed to the cattle; i.e. animal farming gives us a carrying capacity buffer.

    Finally, I provide the argument given by a former co-worker of mine, whose family had turned vegetarian on him. We were out for Mexican food, and as he ate his steak taco, he said "If God didn't want us to eat animals, he wouldn't have made them so tasty!"
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    I don't think our Paleo ancestors were eating corn fed beef as well.

    Personally I avoid grains, except for occasional Briwn rice. Being Vegan hasn't reduced my energy or ability to build strength.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    bikingbill:I don't think our Paleo ancestors were eating corn fed beef as well.

    Personally I avoid grains, except for occasional Briwn rice. Being Vegan hasn't reduced my energy or ability to build strength.


    It hasn't. Note the current popularity of a plant-based diet among ultra-endurance athletes, including my classmate Rich Roll, Scott Jurek, cyclist Dave Zabriskie, and others. In fact, many non-vegan athletes have recently switched over, at least for training because of the benefits in energy and recovery time (Lance, for one.)

    I am healthy, energetic, feel great and never close to starving. Regarding the last quote, which we hear a couple times a day, would a supreme being really prefer our taste buds over the massive suffering of other creatures in disgusting factory farms?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    bikingbill:Personally I avoid grains...
    Remind me - what's wrong with eating grains again?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    Sigurd:
    bikingbill:Personally I avoid grains...
    Remind me - what's wrong with eating grains again?


    Well, some people have the genetic adaptation to grains ... others less so.

    For some reason, oatmeal gives me indigestion (bread does not).

    I personally love bread, but I'm avoiding it because it's kinda empty calories. Ditto white rice.

    Some of the older grains (Quinoa etc.) are easier to digest than others.

    I do love liquid grain (beer) though ... but I'm limiting that for caloric reasons.

    I may be big now, but I was 100lbs+ heavier before 1996.

    I was eating some fish and egg whites up until a few months ago. Stopped that and got rid of a persistent rash (no idea why, maybe I'm slightly allergic to eggs?).

    Now Dairy, that's a whole topic by itself. I do so miss cheeses.
  7.  
    For every animal you don't eat- I'll eat three!

    On a side note: I've heard the new Slater's 50/50 burger joint is doing a burger of the month that's made of 100% ground bacon. Mmmmmm!

    Bacon is my favorite vegetable.

    Bacon is my favorite food group.

    Without it, where do you get your Vitamin Bacon?!
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    Lets have a slaters 50/50 burger meet up, instead of paseo de tacos (fried beans, chips, and tacos... do any of them look like they work out?) . Our enemy is processed food via chemical reaction - sourced from plant or animal will be bad. Yes, a vegan can die of a heart attack too if their diet is of fried foods! The champion to vegans "forks over knives" is flawed in many ways and based on studies in the 1970s which have been recently disproven. Its funny the dairy study they used, rats where fed 5% dairy diet vs 40% dairy diet. The 40% got cancer, 5% - none... they still ate dairy!! Moderation and variety of natural foods is key!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    If you're wondering if high fat/low carb or high protein/low carb or high carb/low fat make a difference in losing weight:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/10/health/nutrition/q-and-a-are-high-protein-low-carb-diets-effective.html?_r=1

    Oh and Hippy? From the time I was eating solid food till I was 29, I'm sure I ate more meat than you will in your lifetime :-)

    As a teen, a 16+oz Skirt Steak was a typical meal. My dad had grown up dirt poor, and having really rich food was a big deal.

    Oh and Sunday Breakfast. Huge NY bagels with creme cheese (with caviar mixed in) whitefish, eggs, lox ... I must have eaten 4000 calories a day when I was growing up :-)

    BLT's too.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2012
     
    @Cecil: The tasty animal line was a joke, but I have no doubt that many of the people who tell you that are sincere, unfortunately. I agree that industrial animal farming is a rotten business, but probably no more rotten than a lot of other elements of our society. In my world, the human population would drop to 1-2 billion (humanely, somehow); we would inhabit only the parts of the earth that could be farmed in a sustainable manner; we would not mine fossil fuels, and would use only renewable energy sources; we would consume mostly locally-grown produce; livestock would graze on grassy hillsides that are not suitable for other crops; we would all work within bike-commuting distance of home, with great, safe roads (or single track!) to ride on; and people could eat a healthy omnivorous diet if they choose, or a vegan diet if they choose.

    I think there's nothing wrong with a vegan diet if you are educated and conscientiously seek out B12 and maybe iron, zinc, calcium, etc. For most people it is more pragmatic just to eat some meat. To me it is clear that eating meat is not "wrong." I am convinced that eating meat is a natural part of being human--but the more fundamental feature of being human is adaptability. People can survive on all sorts of diets, in all sorts of environments. I once had a roommate who survived, as far as I could tell, on a diet that consisted solely of pasta with some parmigian cheese and popcorn. And he smoked a lot of pot in the early hours of the morning (I found out later). I never saw him eat anything else.

    @Hippy: I don't usually eat much before my short morning rides, and I get pretty hungry by the end. Sometimes I'll ride by a house where someone is cooking bacon, and it drives me absolutely crazy. But the ground bacon burger sounds disgusting--like eating a bowl of whipped cream on its own, instead of on top of something else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2012 edited
     
    @Shady - I appreciate the reasoned discussion. You're right about being careful with B12 - the iron, calcium, and zinc are easy to get naturally and it's a breath of fresh air not to hear about protein, which we have no problem with. I think it is a bit of a stretch to discuss the consequences of what would happen if the whole world went vegan right away-- it's not happening. I agree that a HEALTHY
    omnivorous diet is a better choice than the diet favoured by some long-haired trolls.

    @Synthetic Regarding statistical flaws in old studies-- if you're really interested in studying the health benefits, there are many current studies you can look at, if you're willing to read and consider something new. I still believe many objections are based on the fact that people are just unwilling to to give up something they are used to and like. Bittman's article about milk is packed with actual facts-- even if you believe humans have evolved to eat meat, the evidence is pretty strong that drinking from the breast of another species wasn't in the cards, especially if you're willing to look at non-European evidence.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2012
     
    The China Study is worth a read.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2012
     
    HippyOnaBike:For every animal you don't eat- I'll eat three!

    On a side note: I've heard the new Slater's 50/50 burger joint is doing a burger of the month that's made of 100% ground bacon. Mmmmmm!

    Bacon is my favorite vegetable.

    Bacon is my favorite food group.

    Without it, where do you get your Vitamin Bacon?!


    O...M...G ! ! ! i dont just want that burger, i absolutely NEED it!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2012
     
    One of the last times I had beef was on a trip to Japan in 1989.

    Kobe Beef. REAL Kobe Beef. You could cut it with a spoon.
  8.  
    Hippy and Pac,

    Check out this bike tour in Iowa. It might be something you could get into! HA! (The slide show is worth looking at.)

    Moveable Feast: This Cycling Tour Has Bikers on a Culinary Crusade
    Riders Warned About Gaining a Spare Tire; Kudos for Mr. Pork Chop, the Pancake Man.



    Christopher Gannon/The Des Moines Register

    In Baxter last summer, Jason Gienger grilled pork ribs for the Tama County Pork Producers as the cyclists passed through.

    "Residents are hyping their maple-wood-smoked bacon wrapped sweet corn".



    OKB

    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2012
     
    O MY GOODNESS! lol, i always dreamed there was something this beautiful out there... i just never imagined it was real!
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2012
     
    bikingbill:One of the last times I had beef was on a trip to Japan in 1989.

    Kobe Beef. REAL Kobe Beef. You could cut it with a spoon.


    Shinsengumi on Artesia Blvd. near the Home Depot Center serves Kobe beef. It's expensive, but well worth it. They set a hibachi in front of you and bring a plate of thinly sliced strips of raw beef. I stop there every time I'm up at the Home Depot Center Velodrome. Their miso soup is great and they have Sapporo Ichiban on draft.
  9.  
    PacMUle : "i always dreamed there was something this beautiful out there... i just never imagined it was real!"


    Ha! Just to follow up on too much of a good thing. The following post really covers the 2012 RAGBRAI well.
    It looks like these folks know how to have fun.

    And for desert, ......Vacation Bacon!

    A feast for the eyes anyway.

    ================

    RAGBRAI 2012 The Hell Of The Corn

    "Last year I decided to go on a 500+ mile ride on a fixed gear ride in the corn strewn lands of Iowa, I had so much that I decided to do it again this year."


    ================== As if that isn't enough, ==========

    Vacation Bacon

    "TeenNiece wove slices of the cured pork into a meaty mat, sprinkled the whole thing with brown sugar, and baked it until crispy and caramelized."

    ===========================================



    Ride well and be safe out there.

    OKB

    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2012
     
    nice read OKB! i love this part... "for the record you can’t live on corn and fried Twinkies for a week without repercussions"
  10.  
  11.  
    To add to the pic above-

    It is important to remember the sourcing of our food. Factory farms are cruel and disgusting, and we can do better. I know my bacondiet doesn't rub everyone here the right way, but I do still love my pigmeat and feel that it is good for me. The terrible practices of our animal farming are not the only way- and bacon tastes better from a pig that isn't tortured. Many thanks to Cecil for always trying to keep me in line.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2012
     
    Well-stated Hippy.
    Thanks.

    And now, a more serious link for contemplation (very off-topic)

    http://dogshaming.tumblr.com
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2012
     
    ^^lol... funny stuff!^^
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2013
     
    "French riders in the Tour de France live an average of six years longer than the general population and die less often of cardiovascular problems, researchers said, which may help ease worries about the effect of extreme exercise on the heart."
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2013
     
    the evidence is pretty strong that drinking from the breast of another species wasn't in the cards, especially if you're willing to look at non-European evidence.


    wasnt in the cards for us to build and ride bicycles either! ;)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2013
     
    synthetic:
    the evidence is pretty strong that drinking from the breast of another species wasn't in the cards, especially if you're willing to look at non-European evidence.


    wasnt in the cards for us to build and ride bicycles either! ;)


    nice non-sequitor that. :-)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2013
     
    My legs are so trashed, not from riding ... but from working on the bike for 6 hours and then doing Yoga the next day ... that I gained 4 lbs in a day from water weight ... related to the soreness.

    It felt good to ride this AM. Preferable to walking right now.
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2014 edited
     
    The Age of Aluminum. What would we do without it? Ride an all steel bike and components?

    This maybe the first documentary linking Aluminum's neuro-toxicity to the human body: Aluminum is to your central nervous system as cigarette smoke is to your lungs.
    The video is free to watch until 3/28/2014 -------> vimeo.com/89152658
    More info here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/03/22/aluminum-toxicity-alzheimers.aspx


    When tested in a lab, aluminum contamination has been found in a vast number of products on the market, from foods and beverages to pharmaceuticals, which suggests the manufacturing process itself is a significant part of the problem. Aluminum is found in a shocking number of foods and consumer products, including:

    Foods such as baking powder, self rising flour, salt, baby formula, coffee creamers, baked goods and processed foods, coloring and caking agents
    Drugs, such as antacids, analgesics, anti-diarrheals, and others; additives such as magnesium stearate
    Vaccines—Hepatitis A and B, Hib, DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis), pneumococcal vaccine, Gardasil (HPV), and others
    Cosmetics and personal care products such as antiperspirants, deodorants (including salt crystals, made of alum), lotions, sunscreens, and shampoos
    Aluminum products, including foil, cans, juice pouches, tins, and water bottles
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2014
     
    markphilips:The Age of Aluminum. What would we do without it? Ride an all steel bike and components?

    This maybe the first documentary linking Aluminum's neuro-toxicity to the human body: Aluminum is to your central nervous system as cigarette smoke is to your lungs.
    The video is free to watch until 3/28/2014 -------> vimeo.com/89152658
    More info here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/03/22/aluminum-toxicity-alzheimers.aspx


    When tested in a lab, aluminum contamination has been found in a vast number of products on the market, from foods and beverages to pharmaceuticals, which suggests the manufacturing process itself is a significant part of the problem. Aluminum is found in a shocking number of foods and consumer products, including:

    Foods such as baking powder, self rising flour, salt, baby formula, coffee creamers, baked goods and processed foods, coloring and caking agents
    Drugs, such as antacids, analgesics, anti-diarrheals, and others; additives such as magnesium stearate
    Vaccines—Hepatitis A and B, Hib, DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis), pneumococcal vaccine, Gardasil (HPV), and others
    Cosmetics and personal care products such as antiperspirants, deodorants (including salt crystals, made of alum), lotions, sunscreens, and shampoos
    Aluminum products, including foil, cans, juice pouches, tins, and water bottles


    Hey Mark,

    Google "Doctor" Mercola. Especially pay attention to his many entries on Quackwatch. He's responsible for so much bullshit, including anti-vaccine quackery.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2014
     
    Don't cook on Aluminum or Teflon.

    That's my advice.
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2014
     
    Paul:
    markphilips:The Age of Aluminum. What would we do without it? Ride an all steel bike and components?

    This maybe the first documentary linking Aluminum's neuro-toxicity to the human body: Aluminum is to your central nervous system as cigarette smoke is to your lungs.
    The video is free to watch until 3/28/2014 -------> vimeo.com/89152658
    More info here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/03/22/aluminum-toxicity-alzheimers.aspx


    When tested in a lab, aluminum contamination has been found in a vast number of products on the market, from foods and beverages to pharmaceuticals, which suggests the manufacturing process itself is a significant part of the problem. Aluminum is found in a shocking number of foods and consumer products, including:

    Foods such as baking powder, self rising flour, salt, baby formula, coffee creamers, baked goods and processed foods, coloring and caking agents
    Drugs, such as antacids, analgesics, anti-diarrheals, and others; additives such as magnesium stearate
    Vaccines—Hepatitis A and B, Hib, DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis), pneumococcal vaccine, Gardasil (HPV), and others
    Cosmetics and personal care products such as antiperspirants, deodorants (including salt crystals, made of alum), lotions, sunscreens, and shampoos
    Aluminum products, including foil, cans, juice pouches, tins, and water bottles


    Hey Mark,

    Google "Doctor" Mercola. Especially pay attention to his many entries on Quackwatch. He's responsible for so much bullshit, including anti-vaccine quackery.




    maybe you can take this online convert to veganism effort and use it to get us some vegan place on sdbikecommuter? just sayin brah!
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2014 edited
     
    Mercola didn't make the documentary. It was made in Austria. The Vimeo owner didn't allow imbedding of the video alone. So I had to include the link from Mercola website. Just look at the evidence: The prevalence of Aluminum in vaccines, prescription drugs, and cosmetics is unbelievable. I switched anti-perspirant without AL long time ago. We already switched to stainless steel and iron cooking pans.

    On a side note, several tons of geo-engineering aerosols are composed of Aluminum and other toxic metallic oxides. These are dumped out of the stratosphere to reflect sunlight (climate change experiments). It pollutes everything below it.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2014
     
    I haven't looked at the video, so I don't know the specific claims. But I do know the following: 8% of the earth's crust is aluminum, third most abundant element by weight, most abundant metallic element. Aluminum oxides probably make up a good proportion of the dust that a person inhales as part of being an air-breathing animal on this planet, and we certainly ingest large amounts of aluminum oxides when we eat plants that have bits of soil on them. We evolved in an environment filled with aluminum. Life does not use aluminum for biological purposes, but it is certainly well-tolerated in general. I know there are associations between dementia and high concentrations of aluminum, but this is pretty likely a result, rather than a cause, of the disease process that causes dementia.

    There are plenty of environmental toxins that we should be concerned about, but I don't believe aluminum is one of them. For example, iron is incredibly toxic. We have no way of naturally removing excess iron other than bleeding, and hundreds of children are poisoned each year in the US, some fatally, from iron overdose. This is typically from nutritional supplements, but cooking in iron cookware can contribute to overall iron intake. Some authorities actually recommend not to use iron cookware when cooking for young children. I personally don't have any issue with using cast iron cookware on occasion, but I would hesitate to use it for everyday cooking for a young family. I have no issue with aluminum cookware or non-stick cookware, except that I think stainless steel is nicer to cook with (on the three occasions per year when I do actually cook.)

    And I have to add that avoiding vaccines because of fear of aluminum or mercury poisoning is a complete misjudgment of relative risk, both for the individual and for the community. I very willingly vaccinated my children with vaccines that contained aluminum (alum, a vaccine adjuvant) and mercury (thiomersol, a preservative), because it is the most reasonable choice for protection of their health. Would I prefer to have zero mercury exposure? Of course. But thiomersol-preserved vaccines containing alum adjuvant have proven very practical over the years, and I don't believe the tiny amount of mercury poses a significant health risk.
    • CommentAuthorerik
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2014
     
    Just going to throw this out there: the average tuna sandwich has more mercury than a vaccine.

    As for aluminum, it definitely has a toxicity, but so does almost every metal we use. Good luck getting through life avoiding every toxic metal. I generally ignore anything Mercola says or approves of, and I would go the same route here. You can find a medically minded discussion of aluminum toxicity here:

    http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=164929
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      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2014 edited
     
    synthetic:maybe you can take this online convert to veganism effort and use it to get us some vegan place on sdbikecommuter? just sayin brah!
    Where did I say anything about veganism?
    Reading is fundamental.