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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2009
     
    Please post your technical and mechanical questions here.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    Could somebody help me out on an question about bikes for instance trek vesus schwinn vs. mongoose
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    thats a pretty broad generalized question. all three of those companies made dozens and dozens of different models of bikes. some good some bad. we would need photos, or model's and years.

    Trek is a good brand name but they have many different bike lines.

    Schwinn was bought out (again) a few years back. now it's a pretty junky department store brand. most of their new product is department store junk with only a couple of their products being descent.

    Mongoose was also bought out several years ago. the older Mongoose was low end to medium quality. ALL new Mongoose is junk. department store quality stuff.

    show us exact examples of bikes you are looking at and we'll steer you in the correct direction.
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      CommentAuthordanarel
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    dave, what exactly are you looking for in a bike?
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009 edited
     
    Cool, I seen trek 820s, and univega landrovers on craigslist and all in my price range, I'm thinking thats where I would start, now you collect older styles, and my dad had a mid eighties rockhopper that I would take out to the desert of eastern Washington so that is the style which I'm familar with and comfortable riding
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    100 to 150 is what I want to spend right off. Until either my jewelry or assembly position take off , then let the mods begin
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    yeah, the lower end mountain bikes can make for good solid commuters if you get higher pressure street tires for them. they won't travel as quick or efficiently as other bikes but they'll for sure do the job. just stay far away from department store bikes. The Trek 820 should do you fine.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2009
     
    Are the mods on the trek difficult to find rear rack lights,etc
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2009
     
    na, those parts are all universal and will fit the Trek no problem. same goes for any name brand mountain bike.

    generally i would prefer a higher end old mountain bike over a newer cheaper quality mountain bike. an old steel mountain bike with solid components like Deore with thumb shifters would last you forever. they have no suspension either and make for great reliable commuters. they're cheap too. bikes like this:

    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2009
     
    Nice, knowing what to look for in a decent starter bike is a great help thanks.
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009
     
    [quote][cite] Davbu4:[/cite]Nice, knowing what to look for in a decent starter bike is a great help thanks.[/quote]

    Dave, I have a bike, semi complete, that you can have to get your feet on the ground. It'll require brakes, pedals, and a newer front wheel, but if you need one, let me know. The front wheel is deemed "untruable" due to frozen nipples. The brakes are older center pulls that just don't grab enough to be safe. Otherwise, it works; single speed or fixed, it's got a flip flop rear.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009
     
    sounds great..I would really like to see it. got an interview monday for test tech in miramar could use a good commute bike..
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009
     
    I'll take a picture to night and post it up. I'm sure my wife will cry fowl, but if you need it, it's yours.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009 edited
     
    Swwwwwwwwwwwwwweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeettttttttttttttt!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If this doesn't fly , How good is the Raleigh M-40 I just seen one on cl for 55$ also a Cannondale for 200
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009
     
    [quote][cite] Davbu4:[/cite]Swwweeett!! If this doesn't fly , How good is the Raleigh M-40 I just seen one on cl for 55$ also a Cannondale for 200[/quote] Dunno about a raliegh M40,cannondales are OK (I've had one for several years), but IMHO, I like steel frames at least for city day to day riding. Here's this thing: <a href="http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/fSN0Eow7btZ1BPtm-KNp4g?authkey=yJ1FcAgDtio&feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/_q18A8KPvNBE/SXk7GsD6TmI/AAAAAAAAB-M/w7wXi7-Smok/s400/donor%20bike.JPG" /></a> Disclaimer/info: I bought it for small cash at a thrift shop, stripped it, cleaned up the parts, rattle can painted it. Frame and fork appear to be really sound. The rear wheel is good. The seat is new. Everything else is salvage from the bike. To be a good daily rider, you'll need to find some kind of front wheel for it, and work the brakes out (the center pulls just aren't working), and put grips on it. For what needs to be done with it, you might be able to find a better deal on Craigslist for a complete bike. But if you've got mechanical skills, and access to cheap parts: it'll do as a daily rider. It might need pedals, I don't know if I have the originals (I need the SPD's that are on it pretty badly). It rides nice, but it's a 56, not really for taller folks. The deal: it's yours if you need it and are in a bind. When you get settled and upgrade to a different bike, it'd be nice to have it back (that way I can work on it and have it as a standby), or if you want, you can slowly upgrade the parts on it to make it a lovely rider. The paint probably isn't great. I'll deliver it to you..
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2009 edited
     
    Just got you're message, and just as I was reading it , I was calling my folks in Idaho, (b-day was today ,37yr) they sent monies, now I can go get that m-40 raleigh. Though thank you for the offer of the tempary solution to my bike issue. I just sent a bid for the Raleigh and for a Univega MTB w/ kangaroo bags. Any info on either bike would be much apperciated. Between Velocult and you FixedSD, both are a credit to the biking community.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2009
     
    I got the bike rides graet, there is the issue of rust on the spokes and other areas, any suggestions on clean-up would be great, don't have a camera rihjt now so can't show you the bike or how happy I am to be riding again
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2009
     
    for the spokes just wipe them down with steel wool and the only thing you can do to protect them is to maybe oil them with linseed oil. for chrome parts use steel wool. if the frame has rust remove all the rust down to bare metal and re-paint that area
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2009
     
    thanks I plan to ride down to talk to one of the guys at Velo Cult to have the bike onced over
    • CommentAuthorEndorphin
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2009
     
    How does one take care of a Brooks saddle?
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> Endorphin:</cite>How does one take care of a Brooks saddle?</blockquote>

    Poof hide or something like that. Il Pirati on here has a brooks; he probably knows.
    •  
      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeFeb 14th 2009
     
    rideproof (follow the directions), and don't sit on it when it gets wet. I'm still uncertain of how to keep it dry in the rain, other than a rain cover, which I don't have. So far I've been using a plastic bag.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 14th 2009
     
    wow, you're up as late as me. 3:20 in the AM.

    we have the Brooks specific rain covers at the show. plastic bags kind of work but i find them slightly annoying. you can get your Brooks we but it just means it won't survive quite as long. after a while of getting soaked and drying out it will turn into a potato chip.
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      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    Any thoughts on chainring size for loaded touring? I bought a Fuji Touring in December and it came set up with 52-42-30, I feel like it could definitely be lower.

    Also, my Brooks hurts my taint. Never had that problem on other saddles. I think it's how I angle my pelvis when I ride, but I've been playing with fit issues for a couple of weeks now and might have to sell it.
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      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    ^How many miles/hours have you logged on that Brooks? Mine felt hard as a rock for a month, commuting daily, before it relaxed and took shape. Now its customized to my "taint."
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      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2009
     
    This is a little beyond bike tech, but cool. I was checking out BostonFixed.com, (I'll probably be moving there in about a year) and they have a google map feature on the forum. One of the tabs at the top of the page, under the logo, says "maps." People can pinpoint places and routes and what-not on it. I think that is an awesome idea. Can we get something like that with on here? It looks like the same software. I don't know much about the inter-web, so I'm of no use.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2009
     
    i think we can. i'm a computer spaz but i think it can be done. DanArel on this forum is the guy that will be pimping this site out and adding all the features so i'll ask him.

    as for the Brooks and the taint: you need to break it in. once it's broken in it will be perfectly shaped to your body and cause no trouble. one thing that really speeds up the break in process is to get the Brooks Proofhide wax. it protects the saddle and softens the leather. in the first 6 six months you can put it on twice but they once every year should be good. you don't want to put it on too often. i'd say without proofhide, maybe 3-6 months to break in. with proofhide, hopefully in one month.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2009
     
    Has anyone tried reelights? Or know of a shop around here that carries them? www.reelight.com
    Flashing LEDs powered by magnets on your spokes, never needs batteries, they have models that will keep flashing at stoplights, or give you a solid beam. Apparently they last forever. They sound pretty awesome, and a lot cheaper than getting a hub dynamo.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2009 edited
     
    i just watched a bunch of Reelight videos on youtube. so far i don't like them. they flash every time a magnet passes the light assembly. this means that the flash rate is FAR too show. led lights from the store flash at a specific rate that's proven to catch your attention. any slower than that and cars will hardly be able to see it and if they do see it they won't think it's a bike because well, they are expecting to see a bike have a different rate of flash. the other problem is it is located on the lower fork and on the lower seat stay which means at certain angles there will be a blind spot caused by the tires to upcoming cars. very dangerous. i also didn't like the attachment method which look like a pain in the ass too me. finally it didn't look bright enough.

    now, if they had it flash at regular "fast" intervals, if they had wires so that you could locate the lights on the bars and seatpost and if it were brighter than i would think that would be pretty a pretty darn novel lighting system. maybe soon they'll have those details figured out. not having to deal with dead and fading batteries and filling landfills with batteries would be awesome, especially if it was inexpensive.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2009 edited
     
    If anybody would like to help me work out how to use the wind up motor out of the emergency flashlights we could try to mount it to the bike with minimum wires, my wife had an old bike powered light system on her huffy it was rusted and useless but it could work to be converted to power an led system(I have an AS in electronics engineering degree) we could market it
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      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2009
     
    Yeah man, I'd love to buy a sweet locally-made bike light from a classy LBS. Make it happen.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2009
     
    I've found a couple of schematics and I have most of the parts now I could use help in designing a housing case for them
    •  
      CommentAuthorAndy
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2009
     
    Altoids tins are classic. Or smaller mint tins if the electronics will fit. Dunno about mounting it to the bike though, you could glue it to an old light mount that you've lost the light for. I know I got plenty of those.
    • CommentAuthorLHT
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2009
     
    Arrg... Surly Long Haul Trucker with bar end shifters. Returned to original shop three times for spontaneous shifting across the last two outside, smallest cogs. Over the last 25 years I've had three different touring bikes with bar ends, I switched out to down tube every time for fast, clean shifting. Does Velo Cult have a ballpark price to swap out these stinking bar-ends with Dura Ace down tube shifters for nine speed? Labor, new cables and housing that come with the new shifters, and tape job included in estimate. Thanks for help, and you can keep the Dura Ace bar ends and cables.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2009
     
    shifters $55 with bar end shifter trade in
    labor $25
    then whatever the cost of the tape you pick out.
    • CommentAuthorLHT
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2009
     
    Thanks, I'm on the way...
  1.  
    I have a Campagnolo Croce d'aune bottom bracket that I am puting on my Fuso, What bottom bracket tool do I need to install it? Sky.. I went with your suggestion and bought crank and bottom bracket together. Still cheaper than just c-record cranks. So if anyone is looking for english C-record bb let me know.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2009 edited
     
    Andy:Has anyone tried reelights? Or know of a shop around here that carries them? www.reelight.com
    Flashing LEDs powered by magnets on your spokes, never needs batteries, they have models that will keep flashing at stoplights, or give you a solid beam. Apparently they last forever. They sound pretty awesome, and a lot cheaper than getting a hub dynamo.


    Yes, I have them on my neighborhood beach/drunk bike and I like them a lot...for a neighborhood beach/drunk bike. I'm not sure if I'd put them on my commuter. I bought the ones (both front and rear) that stay blinking even when you stop so they don't blink every time the magnet goes around. The magnet charges the little battery pack (or whatever it is) and the lights flash at a steady pace and they won't slow down until the charge wears out. Which is about 1-2 minutes after the wheel stops spinning. There are two magnets attached to the spokes so it passes the light/opposing magnet frequently and only takes ~10 feet to get them going and they are pretty darn bright. They'll even start flashing when walking the bike. I think they are very cool and a great idea.

    Other pros: Don't have to worry about them being stolen off your bike. Never have to worry about the battery running out. If you don't use rechargeable batteries for your current lights the reelights are a one time cost. No need to buy batteries again. And if you are drunk you don't have to worry forgetting to turn your lights on! BTW: I don't condone riding you bike drunk!!

    Cons: They are not in the best position for commuting. They are a too low, however, for certain situations so are the lights you put on you seat post and handlebars IMO. The real reason I wouldn't put them on my commuter is they are a bit loud. Well at least the front one on mine is. It isn't really loud but you know they are there. The little magnet pulls on the light inwards a bit as it goes around and the light rattles as it comes back to position. Personally, I wouldn't want to hear that for ~20 miles a day commuting. Setting them up was a little bit of a hassle compared to normal LED lights but I've never had to fiddle with them since.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2009
     
    LHT:Arrg... Surly Long Haul Trucker with bar end shifters. Returned to original shop three times for spontaneous shifting across the last two outside, smallest cogs. Over the last 25 years I've had three different touring bikes with bar ends, I switched out to down tube every time for fast, clean shifting. Does Velo Cult have a ballpark price to swap out these stinking bar-ends with Dura Ace down tube shifters for nine speed? Labor, new cables and housing that come with the new shifters, and tape job included in estimate. Thanks for help, and you can keep the Dura Ace bar ends and cables.
    Can I have your bar end shifters?:face-devil-grin:
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    I wanted to show a link to the silliest (because I feel I would be laughed at for using it) but coolest (because it's so practical) idea I've seen for your bicycle!

    Click-Stand
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    oh man, that looks absolutely stupid. every time you stop you need to find the stand? if you're on an incline there's nothing to stop the bike from rolling front or back. if the handlebars turn at all the bike slides out and falls over. i'd rather just lay my bike down on the ground :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009 edited
     
    Velo Cult:oh man, that looks absolutely stupid. every time you stop you need to find the stand? if you're on an incline there's nothing to stop the bike from rolling front or back. if the handlebars turn at all the bike slides out and falls over. i'd rather just lay my bike down on the ground :)


    Pretty quick to judge there.

    Yes it's silly but it does come with a strap for the brake so it won't roll when you stop. Plus it also has a strap to attach it to your bike so you can find it right away. It's also is lighter and perhaps as if not more stable than any kickstand on the market. Is it perfect...no but it was designed by some guy who has good intentions and loves to tour his bike. I thought it was an interesting idea plus I give credit to someone who actually executed and brought his product to market.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    your right, i would need to try it. for loaded touring and heavy rigs i can't see it being any better than a double kickstand. im not a fan of anything that leans the bike over when you're dealing with heavy bikes. are you going to get one? swing it by the shop if you can.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009 edited
     
    Velo Cult:your right, i would need to try it. for loaded touring and heavy rigs i can't see it being any better than a double kickstand. im not a fan of anything that leans the bike over when you're dealing with heavy bikes. are you going to get one? swing it by the shop if you can.
    I agree with you. Other than being a bit lighter, the double kickstand is better for touring bikes, xtracyles and the like. (However that xtracycle double kickstand is fricking expensive!) For specialty bikes i.e. recumbents I could see this product working. This guy looks like a touring freak and apparently this is what his brainstorming came up with. So maybe he is on to something...I just thought it was interesting.

    LOL, no I don't think I'll buy one which makes this whole discussion kinda funny and moot.:face-smile:
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    Do you know who carries the dynamo tail light and headlight kits
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    we can order them for you. there's a few options on them so stop in the shop and we can show you.
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2009
     
    Nice... spent the morning working on the flashing leds, but some of my components are fault and so I am lookin at bulbs and at least I could mount it to my bike, sucks being unemployed, can't get the parts I want
    • CommentAuthorDavbu4
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2009
     
    Willing to trade Angle grinder for bike parts
    • CommentAuthorevster
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2009
     
    I had a dream that I was at the Velo Cult shop last night (no joke!) so I figured it was a sign that it's time to get moving on this little project I had in mind.

    I want to put this basket on my Redline 925: http://waldsports.com/index.cfm/wald137&139baskets.html

    The problem is that my bike has a quick-release front wheel, and from what I understand these baskets need to mount to the axle of a bolt-on front wheel.

    Now I did see this "multi-fit" basket which comes with legs that can mount to fork eyelets (http://waldsports.com/index.cfm/wald198gbbasket.html) but that's not the style I want and I don't really want to buy 2 different baskets just to get the right pair of legs (though I probably will if that's what it takes).

    I've done some searching online but I couldn't find a solution to this problem. Surely it's happened to other people before. Is there a way to mod the basket legs to fit on a quick-release wheel? If I do need to wind up buying a bolt-on wheel, is this something I can get used at Velo Cult?

    Thanks everyone!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2009
     
    hey Evster, no problem on that rack you really want. we know how to make it work with your quick release axle. the only thing is when do want to remove your front wheel it's not as quick and easy but it's do-able. DR.J on this forum has this setup on his commuter bike. i believe we have that rack in stock too right now.

    so, im not the only one that dreams about the shop. glad to hear im not alone. although, i think we're dreaming about different things :face-smile: