Not signed in (Sign In)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2010
     
    The Salmon Pads from REI also do the trick.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2010 edited
     
    This question goes out to Sky and other "setup specialists" here.

    We have a "family bike" that we all use to potter around town for shopping and such. It is an old touring bike (Miyata 610) fitted with a basic townie handlebar:

    Photobucket

    Although a family bike, its primary user is my wife: She likes a completely upright riding position, but feels that the current handlebar setup is "too low" and "too much forward" - she would like to have the handles 4-6" farther back and 1-2" up. The bike has its original quill stem w/shifters (triple).

    How do I accommodate her need for a more upright riding style? Different stem or handlebar, or both?

    Thanks for any ideas.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2010 edited
     
    Well, being that upright means you are going to loose any power output from your legs. She'll have a real hard time climbing even the smallest hill.

    That being said, avoid going higher at all costs. Higher handlebars just make things worse. A handlebar that comes way back will still get you upright but puts your hands in a much better position for comfort. Albatross bars sweep back the most. With a short stem (Technomics would be best) and albatross you'll be as upright as you can get with a bike like that.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2010 edited
     
    We can get really short (50mm) Technomics stems

    •  
      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2010
     
    I'm thinking an omafiets is in your family's future.

    All due respects, as the riding position does limit maximum power, but traveling in PB, you don't have hills on a regular basis. For slow speed downtown traffic, grabbing groceries, I love riding my bakkersfiets (and it's a single speed). For everything else, use something else. It's definitely a flat-lander.

    Oma's can adjust to accomodate a large range of rider heights too!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2010
     
    Yeah, if you stick to only flat lands a Dutch bike is comfy. They are bit on the heavy side though. The Dutch style Linus bike is without question the most comfortable bike I have ridden ever. It's got comfort and is relatively light weight.

    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2010
     
    Maybe before anything else you can just get that Technomics stem and see how things go from there. That gets you higher and closer.
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2010 edited
     
    I used this and Albatross bars for my wife's bike and she is finally happy with the riding position.
    It's the Nitto Periscopa from Rivendell.



    Univega Townie
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2010
     
    If I don't wear lyrca, and I'm fast finding out my "cheap" solution of modified dickies isn't cheap (wearing holes in the buttocks and the zipper is leaving rude rub areas on places that don't like to be rubbed with metal), what type of cycling pants does anyone here like?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2010
     
    I ride nothing but really expensive bike shorts. I know they cost more but they are WAY more comfortable and they last WAY longer. Right now I'm stoked on Assos bibs. I always go for bibs too. Cheap shorts have substandard pads, too few panels that leave the cut un-naturally, and they wear out fast.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2010
     
    Dickies. I love that they're cheap and the length is "customizable"

    Before Dickies, I swore by military issue BDU pants. They had an extra layer of fabric on the seat and the length was again, "customizable". haha
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2010
     
    I ride MTB shorts sans padding, but I'm riding on a seriously padded seat (recumbent).
    • CommentAuthorSDAirBrush
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2010
     
    I have a 9 speed Shimano105 32 spoke hub. I want a strong 700c rim and strong spokes laced to it. The wheel is for my road bike with regular brakes. I do a lot of wheelies and curb hopping!

    Do you need the bike to get the dishing correct?
    What rim should I go with?
    What spokes should I go with?
    who can do the lacing?

    Advice appreciated, Thanks!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2010
     
    The strongest would be a Deep-V style rim. Velocity makes a really strong one that's affordable. It's what a lot of the fixed gear riders use for aggressive and trick riding. There's a few other options like touring rims or even 29er rims but the deep-V is probably most suited to curb hopping.

    The dishing always needs to be perfect.

    14 gauge stainless spokes and brass nipples will do you good.

    At Velo Cult we can do this for you professionally. It will be as strong as possible. We build custom wheels nearly every day. We even have a Phil Wood spoke cutting machine so we don't have to worry if your spoke length is in stock, we just cut and thread it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    My rear rim is shot. Doing a rebuild will run about $140 (rim, spokes and labor). The front one was rebuilt about 2000 miles ago, the rear 1000 miles ago.

    Yeah, I should have replaced the rims and junked the metal eating rear pads.

    The wheels have 11,000 miles on them. Am I just better off replacing them with this:

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_509008_-1_201774_10000_200472

    Vuelta Zerolite Mountain Bike Wheelset

    An excellent set of rim-brake mountain wheels at a great price. The Vuelta Zerolite Mountain Bike Wheelset offers a lightweight, quality set of wheels that will be a sure upgrade for any newly confirmed MTB addict. 26mm medium-V rim with CNC-machined sidewalls for better stopping power. 2.8mm black stainless steel spokes, 24 front/24 rear, 3-cross lacing. Colors: Black/White. Wt.: 2138g/pr.

    $70 for the pair. The machined sidewalls sound good and these have bladed spokes.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    Currently running 700x28-32 tubes in my 700x32 tires. I was considering upping the tube to 700x32-? to get thicker rubber when inflated. Do such tubes exist with a presta valve?
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    Velo Cult:I ride nothing but really expensive bike shorts. I know they cost more but they are WAY more comfortable and they last WAY longer. Right now I'm stoked on Assos bibs. I always go for bibs too. Cheap shorts have substandard pads, too few panels that leave the cut un-naturally, and they wear out fast.


    I'm looking more for shants than cycling shorts. The shorts with the pad typically make me feel way to... 'moist'! Something like chrome nickers, but I've heard that the chrome ones are not all that comfortable.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    SDAirBrush:
    What rim should I go with?
    who can do the lacing?


    Deep V's are popular amongst many people. They are trendy. But I've had some for a LONG time, and never had a problem with them. I'm rather heavy, and 32 spoke holds up very, very well. But aside from that, it depends on the build. There are just 3 people who have built rims that stay true (for me)

    Anthony at Velocult.
    Dan who works for Campy now.
    Ernesto who I haven't seen in years.

    I played bike polo for 3 games on one set and they stayed true even after some pretty good collisions. And subsequent rides along San Diego's less than perfect streets, including a few curb hops.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    I think it was Tom at Velo Cult that built your wheels. Tom and myself are the big wheel builders. I can honestly say Tom is as good as me. He knows it all and all his wheel builds are rock solid.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    Sorry. Tom ~ I'm horrible with names! But the wheels are still true!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2010 edited
     
    Right now, my financial priority is saving for a car. However, after that, I'm looking to upgrade to a nicer bike. I'm looking with much interest at the randonneuring thread and the recent 650b thread and that's definitely the general direction that I'm leaning. I'm thinking that I'll probably have VC build me something custom. What I want is a fast and versatile commuter -- preferably with very low maintenance. It's still going to be a while before I'm ready to pull the trigger so at this point, I'm just exploring ideas.

    Keeping all of that in mind, I was looking at some belt drive bikes and wondered what people thought of them?

    I even found an example of a belt drive bike with a Rohloff hub, which means it would also have a wide range of gearing which would be nice. Oddly enough, other than the drive train, this looks like a road racing bike, which is not really what I'm looking for, but still it I find it interesting. I'm not crazy about the shifter.

    http://road.cc/content/news/10577-exclusive-santos-unveil-rohloffgates-belt-drive-road-concept

    Apparently there's an adapter available for the Rohloff to work with belt drives:

    http://www.rohloff.de/no_cache/en/info/faq/faq_detail/index.html?tx_ttnews[backPid]=284&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=989&cHash=4c2ee831eb&sword_list[0]=belt

    Rohloff's only come in 32 spoke versions AFAIK. I'm thinking that 36 would be better for commuting reliability.

    Other random thoughts I'm kicking around:

    Schmidt SON hub and Edelux light.
    Mechanical disc brakes. I know hydraulic is supposed to be reliable but I just feel more comfortable with cables.
    Front rack - maybe a real front rack; not low riders.
    Fenders were always a given.
    Time to give in and get some pedals that support walkable shoes. No idea what to get there. SPD? Frogs? Egg Beaters?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2010
     
    We'd love to help you with your next project Bill.

    A Rando would be perfect for you and your style of riding. You never carry more than 10 or 15lbs of stuff from what I can tell a rando will be quicker, more lively feeling and more fun than a touring bike.

    The word I keep getting on belt drive is they have far more resistance than a chain drive. That's why you don't see belt drives everywhere. Belt drive also requires a customized frame that allows the frame to split apart so you can get the belt in there.

    A big YES on the SON and Edelux lighting. My next bike is getting that too.

    I would steer you away from disc brakes. You can run them but they only work good on mountain bikes. Their advantage is they clear mud. They also don't work well with bikes that have loads. That's why you don't see touring bikes with them. You see some tandems with disc but that's a huge mistake. Disc brakes weigh about a pound more than cantilever brakes. The pads wear out super quick if you have a heavy load. Disc brakes get too hot as well if there's a load. On long mountainous rides you run too much of a risk of burning right through your pads, especially if you are carrying weight. Keep in mind that canitilver rim brakes are disc, it just uses your rim as the disc. Lastly cantilevers have the best modulation. DIsc brakes have the worse modulation in the bike world. The brake is on or off and not much exists in between. For a rando you could get a way with using disc but i believe and most others believe that canti's are superior to disc.

    I am a huge fan of Frogs. They are the safest on the knees and feel the best. They are in Kearny Mesa too. They don't run on springs which leaves them to be much more reliable. I refuse to run any spring actuated pedal. I raced them all for years and years and Frogs are the best. Egg Beaters had a good following at first but lately people are seeing the downfalls of them a lot more. Most of my friends that were Egg Beater fans now don't want anything to do with them. I will say that the frogs take some getting used to, especially if you are used to other clipless pedals. Once you get used to them though you won't go back. I can let you put on my shoes and check them out if you want. We're only 4 condo's apart from each other. BTW, I don't even sell Frogs since we don't carry shoes. I just think they are the best.
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2010 edited
     
    I just picked up clamp-on handlebar grips used on Electra Ticinos that have the channel for the cable housing. Perfect for routing barcon cables without using bartape. This will fit nicely on the Nitto Albatross bars.
    Image below was taken from Electra and is not the bike project I'm currently working on.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2010
     
    We carry Electra parts at the shop. They have a few things in their accessory lineup that I like. That's one them.
  1.  
    Thanks. I didn't know that. I walked in at Alan's bike shop in Oceanside on my way home....I meant to post on the projects thread. so I will be deleting the one above.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 20th 2010 edited
     
    Velo Cult:You never carry more than 10 or 15lbs of stuff from what I can tell a rando will be quicker, more lively feeling and more fun than a touring bike.
    I wouldn't say never but it is rare for me to want to carry more than that.
    The word I keep getting on belt drive is they have far more resistance than a chain drive. That's why you don't see belt drives everywhere.
    Hmm, the stuff I've been reading has been saying it's the same, but I suspect that what I've been reading is marketing hype and thus less reliable
    Belt drive also requires a customized frame that allows the frame to split apart so you can get the belt in there.
    That should have been obvious but I did not think of it. It all but eliminates the possibility of using an existing frame.
    I would steer you away from disc brakes. You can run them but they only work good on mountain bikes. Their advantage is they clear mud. They also don't work well with bikes that have loads. That's why you don't see touring bikes with them. You see some tandems with disc but that's a huge mistake. Disc brakes weigh about a pound more than cantilever brakes. The pads wear out super quick if you have a heavy load. Disc brakes get too hot as well if there's a load. On long mountainous rides you run too much of a risk of burning right through your pads, especially if you are carrying weight. Keep in mind that canitilver rim brakes are disc, it just uses your rim as the disc. Lastly cantilevers have the best modulation. DIsc brakes have the worse modulation in the bike world. The brake is on or off and not much exists in between. For a rando you could get a way with using disc but i believe and most others believe that canti's are superior to disc.
    Is that the same with both hydraulic and mechanical disc brakes like the Avid's? I'm guessing that the Avids might have better modulation than hydraulics. I'm still riding old style single pulls, so I have a ton of modulation (maybe too much).
    I am a huge fan of Frogs.
    Interesting. I had heard from someone a while back that as the cleats start to wear, they develop a clicking noise as you pedal. Apparently some people find this annoying and others don't care. Has that been your experience?

    One thought I had in favor of SPD is that you can get them with a combo block pedal, which could be handy sometimes since I wouldn't always need to wear bike shoes to ride. Not sure if I care about that or not but it's something to think about.

    Any thoughts on the Rohloff? I think it's pretty cool to have 14 evenly spaced gears with a wide range. The down sides I'm aware of are the cost, single choice of spoke count and I'm not too fond of the shifter. A single cog will be easier to clean than a cluster and derailleur. It might even allow a chain guard or maybe even a chain case.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2010 edited
     
    While doing a bit of research on the SON, I stumbled across a cell phone charger for it:

    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/ewerk.asp

    Manufacturer's site:

    http://www.bumm.de/index-e.html?docu/361e.htm

    A little pricey, but kind of cool -- at least for gadget geeks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2010
     
    The cable actuated disc brakes have a little more modulation than hydraulic because of a tiny bit of cable stretch. Still not nearly as much as cantilevers. I can build you up the bike with disc no problem but you aren't really getting any advantages for having it. You are going to have to be really careful braking while in corners, especially when it's wet. it's really easy to lock up the wheels. My modern mountain bikes have it because disc is the best for mud. Still though I have lots of mountain bikes with cantilever brakes and their modulation is far superior to disc. They just don't work as great in mud.


    A worn out Frog cleat can rattle around in the pedal if you push and pull. That can be adjusted out but honestly I've never cared on bit. I will say that I only use my Frogs off road though and maybe on my commuter sometimes. Usually on pavement I ride Speedplay road pedals. WIth the road pedals you can't walk around very easily but like with any road pedal and show they are stiffer and give you more power than mountain bike shoes/pedals. Now if you want to have a platform pedal with clipless you'll have to consider other brands obviously.

    In case you didn't know we are a dealer for Son hubs and the lights, I think I have access to that charger too. I'm about to order those for myself as well. I can save you a little money on them. I want that charger for my GPS and cell phone for touring.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2010 edited
     
    I remember you mentioning that you were a dealer. I was figuring that if I had you build up the bike, I'd have you get all of the stuff while you were at it anyway. I can see that charger coming in handy for touring. Maybe my next bike after the fast commuter will be a proper tourer. My Parabola is technically a touring bike, but I don't think I'd want to do a real tour on it.

    I still have plenty of time for research on this stuff. I love that I can look stuff up as well as ask questions on forums. I almost said I couldn't do that 20 years ago but actually in 1990, I was on Usenet in rec.bicycles. IIRC, Sheldon Brown and Jobst Brandt were active on rec.bicycles even back then so I at least had a place I could ask questions online back then.
    • CommentAuthorAlanKHG
    • CommentTimeNov 22nd 2010
     
    William.:
    Velo Cult:I ride nothing but really expensive bike shorts. I know they cost more but they are WAY more comfortable and they last WAY longer. Right now I'm stoked on Assos bibs. I always go for bibs too. Cheap shorts have substandard pads, too few panels that leave the cut un-naturally, and they wear out fast.


    I'm looking more for shants than cycling shorts. The shorts with the pad typically make me feel way to... 'moist'! Something like chrome nickers, but I've heard that the chrome ones are not all that comfortable.

    I got two pair of the Cutter knickers on Bonktown for $30 a couple weeks back. They're stretchy & comfy; a little warm in hot weather.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeNov 22nd 2010
     
    AlanKHG:
    William.:
    Velo Cult:I ride nothing but really expensive bike shorts. I know they cost more but they are WAY more comfortable and they last WAY longer. Right now I'm stoked on Assos bibs. I always go for bibs too. Cheap shorts have substandard pads, too few panels that leave the cut un-naturally, and they wear out fast.


    I'm looking more for shants than cycling shorts. The shorts with the pad typically make me feel way to... 'moist'! Something like chrome nickers, but I've heard that the chrome ones are not all that comfortable.

    I got two pair of the Cutter knickers on Bonktown for $30 a couple weeks back. They're stretchy & comfy; a little warm in hot weather.


    Did you forget a zero there? I can't find them for any less than $150.
  2.  
    im looking for a bicycle mechanic school that is open to the public in or near san diego?
    i remember hearing about one that happens a few times a year around here but im drawing a blank and i have a customer interested in getting involved in such.

    thanks,
    brian
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 23rd 2010
     
    It's not a professional school by any means but REI has a short class for some basics. I don't know of any professional classes local.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2010 edited
     
    I've heard of two "pro" schools, United Bike Institute (Oregon) and Barnett Bicycle Institute (Colorado). UBI even offers classes in frame building, steel (braze & tig) and titanium (tig).

    Park Tool has a set of class plans available for bike shops and other organizations that want to put on classes, but I think they're less pro style and more meant to teach people how to do maintenance on their bikes. I haven't taken a class but I get the impression that it's mostly just a way for them to get people to pay to advertise Park Tools, which tend to be a bit on the mediocre side in my experience. They've got the table of contents for the instructors guide online. It gets moderately advanced with stuff like wheel truing, installing bottom brackets and head sets and such but doesn't include very advanced things like wheel building or frame repair/building etc. I suspect that most bike shops with competent mechanics could put together something similar if they wanted to.

    The Park Tool web site does have a lot of fairly useful tutorials. Sheldon Brown has some useful advice.

    I actually learned most of what I know from my college roommate, who learned from his dad who was a big bike nut.

    I usually just go to V.C. when I need something done. It's easier and their labor prices are better than some others I've used. I do a little cleaning (I should do a lot more), lube the chain, fix flats, adjust my rear derailleur a bit. I just don't feel like doing much more most of the time. I even go to V.C. to replace cables anymore. I just don't feel like messing with it.
    • CommentAuthorjacobk
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2010
     
    Semi-related question: Does anyone know of any local wheel building classes or workshops?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2010
     
    I just looked at the REI web site. They do have classes in December, but only at the Chula Vista and Encinitas locations; not the Kearny Mesa location.
    • CommentAuthorAlanKHG
    • CommentTimeNov 24th 2010 edited
     
    t.e.d:
    AlanKHG:
    William.:
    Velo Cult:I ride nothing but really expensive bike shorts. I know they cost more but they are WAY more comfortable and they last WAY longer. Right now I'm stoked on Assos bibs. I always go for bibs too. Cheap shorts have substandard pads, too few panels that leave the cut un-naturally, and they wear out fast.


    I'm looking more for shants than cycling shorts. The shorts with the pad typically make me feel way to... 'moist'! Something like chrome nickers, but I've heard that the chrome ones are not all that comfortable.

    I got two pair of the Cutter knickers on Bonktown for $30 a couple weeks back. They're stretchy & comfy; a little warm in hot weather.


    Did you forget a zero there? I can't find them for any less than $150.

    $30, each. Cutter is a Backcountry house brand & Bonktown is where they sell things cheaply. I wouldn't be shocked if they show up again or go on sale at a big percentage at some point.
    • CommentAuthorSDAirBrush
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2010
     
    ? Can a bike with integrated brake/shifters be converted to downtube shifters using the cable stops on the downtube? Looks like it could just not sure. Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2010
     
    If the bike has the down tube braze-on's it's no issue. Sounds like you may have the cable stops that adapt the shifter bosses to cable stops, is that right?

    If you don't have the shifter braze-on's you can run friction clamp on down tube shifters so long as it's not an oversized down tube.

    If you post up a photo of the area I can give you a definitive answer.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2010
     
    Just curious. Why do you want to switch to downtube shifters?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2010 edited
     
    I had some other thoughts on brakes. What about linear pull (V) brakes vs. regular cantis? How about long reach dual pivots? Would a 42mm tire be too wide to get through those? Another thought I had was maybe do a cable actuated disc on the front and a long reach dual pivot, linear pull or canti on the back? I'd definitely want more modulation on the back than the front given that it's so much easier to lock up the back than the front. Maybe even get a long reach single pivot for the back if that's possible? It doesn't take a lot of power to lock the back up, especially in the wet.

    Apparently you can buy just one BB7 Road. I see it's available with 160mm, 185mm and 203mm rotor sizes. I'm guessing that the bigger rotors give less modulation than the smaller ones but they probably also dissipate heat better. They're probably also a bit more prone to being knocked out of true. I'm seeing long reach brake calipers being sold singly (Harris Cyclery for example). Whether disc front/caliper back is a good idea is still to be determined, but at least I know it can be done without buying extra brakes.

    Avid appears to make three different types of cantis that work with road levers. However none of their linear pulls appear to do the same. Apparently they can be adapted however, using the "Problem Solvers Travel Agent" adapter.

    I'm not a big fan of the center pull cabling necessary for standard cantis, especially on the front.

    Stream of consciousness posting....
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2010
     
    There's a lot to go through in that post Bill. I'll take a stab at it.

    Linear pull brakes are powerful but have pretty bad modulation and small thin brake pads that wear out fast. Too fast for touring bikes where you want pads to last a long time with a heavy load. A lot of todays canti's use linear pull style brake pads which doesn't help with the brake pad wear but does have better modulation. The best are center pull canti's with the older much thicker style of brake pads when you're dealing with heavy loads like a touring bike or tandem. Problem Solvers Travel Agents do adapt road levers (or cantilever brake levers) for use with linear style brakes.

    The disc have less and less modulation as the rotors get bigger. With how fast the pads wear down and hot they get they are only good for cross bikes and mountain bikes. Any bike that holds weight should avoid these at all costs. I know you'll find contrary info on the web but that's people that are running on "theory". The theory that a disc brake must be more powerful with a heavy load. It's just not true in the real world.

    Dual pivot long reach levers can be bought separately. They flex a lot and don't work good for heavy weights yet again. They work good enough for lighter setups and fell good but fail miserably with even medium loads. For large tires you might have to air them down to get them in, they don't open all that wide.

    So, center pull wide arm canti's are still the best. My favorites are the M700 and M730 era Shimano Cantilevers. Trustworthy in every respect, super strong, and very powerful. I have these on my touring bike. I have a few extra sets too.

    deerhead cantilever brakes Pictures, Images and Photos
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010 edited
     
    Here, I tried to find this the other day and finally found it just now. This was written by Rodriguez tandems and bike shop. This is one of the most respected custom builders and bike shops in the country. They know their stuff.

    Everyone should read this article about brakes.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010 edited
     
    I won't be doing loaded touring on this bike and I weigh about 170lbs. I might carry as much as 15-20 pounds occasionally, but typically it will be more like 5 pounds or less.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010
     
    That's do-able with disc or linear. You give up modulation and will gain a more powerful, grabby brake. Sorry, I thought you wanted the option of touring too outside of your regular commute. I get confused sometimes on who i'm talking to with dozens and dozen's of ongoing conversations with people about bikes. :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010 edited
     
    Understandable. I'm sure you've had variations on this conversation with dozens (maybe hundreds) of people given that this is your business. I'm just trying to make sure that I really understand all of the variables before I make a decision. When it comes to big commitments, I tend to research heavily. That article is very interesting.

    If I go for a long reach caliper, it would only be on the back. I think I want something stronger on the front. My reasoning there is that I actually prefer something a bit weaker on the back, because that will make it less likely to lock up. It's the closest I can get to ABS for a bike.
    • CommentAuthorSDAirBrush
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010
     
    Last night at the shop I noticed the tires I want are in stock. Panaracer RiBMo's, Anybody use these tires? from the reviews I read that they are bullet proof? For $90.00 bucks a set they had better be!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010
     
    They do cost a bit but they last nearly forever. The downside is they have a harsh ride as do any of the really thick urban tires. They also are heavier. For some people this is exactly what they want, a tire that hit anything and last 4 times as long as any other tire. The fixed gear crowd loves them because they can skid on them for months as opposed to changing their tires every two weeks. In the long run they end up being cheaper because you are not replacing your tires very often. For a softer, more comfortable, lighter and therefor faster tire I would steer you in a different direction but obviously these tire's won't last as long. There's lots of choices in tires out there and all have their merits.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010 edited
     
    Velo Cult:Here, I tried to find this the other day and finally found it just now. This was written by Rodriguez tandems and bike shop. This is one of the most respected custom builders and bike shops in the country. They know their stuff.


    What I am missing from this discussion is my favorite for rim brakes, the Magura hydraulics. I have them on my mountainbike and wish there was a way to add them to my commuter/road bike. Unfortunately the stopped making the road version and the occasional find on CL or Ebay is just too expensive.

    Just curious to hear what your thoughts are on these?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010
     
    Haha, I actually have a set of the road Magura's somewhere. I hold onto them because I figure someday I will use then on a cross bike but then I never do. I should probably pass them along.

    The Magura's worked fine albeit grabby. They were very powerful. They take more maintenance too so I wouldn't use them for touring but for a cross bike they'd be fine.