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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2010
     
    I'm stumped by these newfangled SPD thingies....

    I just bought a new pair of Shimano MT52 shoes, picked up some SPD pedals at the swap meet. And have new cleats that look just like these:



    The problem is the bolts aren't long enough to reach the threads on the movable plate that goes in the shoe. I assume these are 10mm long (M5x10mm), or maybe 11.5mm. Either way ... too short.

    Do they come in different lengths for different shoes?

    I'm switching from the Shimano Look Compatible 105 Pedals I have been using since 1989 (Let me see, that's six bikes ... close to 100,000 miles). Want shoes I can walk in, and these are comfortable shoes.

    Help would be appreciated.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2010
     
    Oh yeah, the ones I have are shorter then the ones in that pic. That makes sense.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2010
     
    Oh, and on that Chain-L lube? This is what my rear cog looks like after 10,000 miles on one chain and 1,000 miles on a new one (cleaned, of course):



    Not bad.
  1.  
    You can buy these flat head screws for your shoes. Check out Ace hardware in Carlsbad or Encinitas. If they don't carry it, Marshalls hardware will have them.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 3rd 2010
     
    Bill, are you measuring your chain for stretch on a regular basis? With as many miles as you have done you're probably learned that you need to do that. It's sadly not common knowledge though that a stretched chain will destroy the entire drive train.

    People with old chains, please swing it in the shop so we can measure it. If we catch it in time we can save you roughly $150 in replacing parts. As a rule, someone who rides a lot should change their chain every six months.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 3rd 2010
     
    Totally correct.

    I did measure the chain 'stretch' (wearing of the pins etc...). The old chain made it to 10,000 miles and when I put on the new one ... no worries. Now you have to remember that I'm running a a chain almost 3 chains in length and a good distance away from the ground. So they do last longer, 5000 miles was my typical run. But the Chain-L stuff is decent.
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2010 edited
     
    On the way home from a run this morning I noticed a neighbor had a bicycle sticking out of his garbage can and of course I asked him about it.
    1986 rockhopper with shimano M700 deerhead derailleurs, shifters, one set of canti brakes, and a nice looking specialized triple crankset with good pedals.

    So, what is the range of the xt deerhead friction rear derailleur? The original freewheel was a 5-speed but I want to know if it will work with a 7-speed freewheel.
    Also, I might be in the market for another set of M700 canti brakes. Sky?
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010 edited
     
    It's iffy.

    If it's plain old friction (not SIS) it might work. 1986 is old enough that it might not be SIS. For friction use, it depends upon if the derailleur's limit screws will allow it to be moved that far.

    The first problem will be cluster width. The total width of 5 speed from center of the inner cog to center of the outer cog is 21.2mm. The total width of Shimano 7 speed is 30mm so the difference in cluster width is going to be 8.8mm. If the 5 speed derailleur doesn't have that extra range available, then you will be out of luck. Most have plenty of extra so as I said, it might work.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/cribsheet-spacing.shtml

    The second problem will be frame width. 7 speed hubs for MTB's were typically set up for 135mm between the dropouts. 5 speed was only 120mm. Spreading a frame like that doesn't always work so good. I tried shoving a 7 speed into one 6 speed frame and had problems using the smallest cog (the chain would sometimes jam between the frame and the smallest cog). With a different 6 speed frame, it worked fine. YMMV.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010 edited
     
    That's a good find. I always part those out and keep the components for my projects. I love those cranks BTW. M700 Deore XT is Friction. In 1987 index shifting began for Shimano with the M730 series of Deore XT.

    The only way to know if it will work with 7 speed is with trail and error. It probably will but you just don't know until you try. The low cog limit is 30t I believe.

    Yeah, I'm sure I have more M700 brakes around.
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010 edited
     
    I'm pretty excited about the cranks.
    The quality of the shifters is also quite impressive.
    I'm thinking of using the stuff on the bridgestone mb-1 since it's just a lonely frame right now.
    I'd like to give mustache bars a go.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010
     
    The M700 shifters look cool but they take a back seat to Suntour shifters of that time as far as operation.

    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010 edited
     
    I've heard so much about the older suntour shifters but never had a test drive.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010
     
    It's the same shifter mechanism as the microfriction Suntour Barcon shifters.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010
     
    I had the Campy Barcons on my Bob Jackson from 1974 to 1978, Suntour Barcons on the Paris Sport from 1978 to 1989. The Suntour units were EXCELLENT.
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2010
     
    ............QUESTION: looking into a new wheel set... dont know all that much so i was hoping i could get some input from some of you folks here...

    i am looking for a 650c wheel set. i know that strong and light dont necessarily go together, but i would like to find something close to as light as what i have now, spinergy rev-x (already nervous about full carbon wheels & read some scary things so kinda wanna change) but i dont really know where to start. i commute 35 miles a day for work, so i need something strong, but i also like to ride alot for fun so i do want something light. i'v found im more comfertable with less weight because it feels more responsive to me, which is important. but i dont really know where the compromise puts me.

    here are a couple things i'v been thinking of: .....any input would be very much appreciated!

    1) hubs? ... so far it looks like the best value for the money are either, Dura Ace, Chris King, or Velocity.... ???

    2) rims? ... i am particular to more of a deep v style rim. seems like it just makes sense with strength... and i do like mavic a lot! but i am also divided here as well. it seems like all the really good mavic stuff only comes as full wheel sets, hubs spokes & all & cant really order them separately? like this one...
    http://www.mavic.com/en/product/wheels/road-triathlon/wheels/R-Sys-SLR
    it seems like the other major players out there are zipp, reynolds, velocity, easton, but im just not sure of whats "really" road worthy... ?

    3) spokes ? what is a good set up? how many? i prefer less aesthetically, but what is a good strength number 24/28? 28/32? double butted? bladed?

    4) does anyone make any mag style wheels that are actually durable & light? i saw the areospoke by velocity, but they seem pretty heavy compared to spoked wheels.

    .. .. . to say the least, i am just lost here & would really appreciate some input & perspective.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    Afine 11 Speed Hubs are available now...

    http://blog.harriscyclery.com/alfine-11-speed-hubs-in-stock/

    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2010
     
    PacMUle:............QUESTION: looking into a new wheel set... dont know all that much so i was hoping i could get some input from some of you folks here...

    i am looking for a 650c wheel set. i know that strong and light dont necessarily go together, but i would like to find something close to as light as what i have now, spinergy rev-x (already nervous about full carbon wheels & read some scary things so kinda wanna change) but i dont really know where to start. i commute 35 miles a day for work, so i need something strong, but i also like to ride alot for fun so i do want something light. i'v found im more comfertable with less weight because it feels more responsive to me, which is important. but i dont really know where the compromise puts me.

    here are a couple things i'v been thinking of: .....any input would be very much appreciated!

    1) hubs? ... so far it looks like the best value for the money are either, Dura Ace, Chris King, or Velocity.... ???

    2) rims? ... i am particular to more of a deep v style rim. seems like it just makes sense with strength... and i do like mavic a lot! but i am also divided here as well. it seems like all the really good mavic stuff only comes as full wheel sets, hubs spokes & all & cant really order them separately? like this one...
    http://www.mavic.com/en/product/wheels/road-triathlon/wheels/R-Sys-SLR
    it seems like the other major players out there are zipp, reynolds, velocity, easton, but im just not sure of whats "really" road worthy... ?

    3) spokes ? what is a good set up? how many? i prefer less aesthetically, but what is a good strength number 24/28? 28/32? double butted? bladed?

    4) does anyone make any mag style wheels that are actually durable & light? i saw the areospoke by velocity, but they seem pretty heavy compared to spoked wheels.

    .. .. . to say the least, i am just lost here & would really appreciate some input & perspective.


    1) As for hubs the Dura Ace and Chris King are certainly awesome. They are expensive though. Best value would be more on the Ultegra or Shimano 600 side of things.

    2)The Velocity Deep V's will be your best value and still really nice quality if you really want a deep V style rim. It's competitors are heavier and not built as nice. You're commuting so the ultralight carbon stuff would not be as appropriate and wicked expensive. I'm a pretty big supporter of the Velocity Aerohead front and Aerohead AC for the rear. Very strong and very light. Just a great setup.

    3)The strongest setup is 32 spokes. You can certainly do 28 though considering you are doing a smaller 650c wheel if you like. Strait 14 gauge is you best bet. They are the best value too. Double butted could be done but are weaker and more expensive. I would stay away from bladed for this application.

    4)Without getting into wheels that cost double the value of the and more it's just Aerospoke. But like you already mentioned they are heavier. I believe I have a front one in my warehouse.
    • CommentAuthorkyle
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2010
     
    I have a question. I'm looking to convert my free-wheel single-speed bike to a fixed gear. It currently has 27 inch wheels.

    - Does anyone make a 27 inch wheel with a flip flop hub?
    - Else, could I put 700c wheels on my bike without having to put new brakes on it? It seems like the size difference is pretty small (maybe 8 mm diameter) and I could adjust my brakes to hit the 700 rims. Of course, I guess I could just remove the rear brake, but I'd rather not do that just yet.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2010
     
    You can keep the brakes only if the brakes you have, have enough adjustment in them to work. You have to put a wheel in there to find out. Usually though new brakes are needed.

    Now, We can build you a custom wheel with a fixed/freewheel flip flop hub that has a 27" rim. That's no problem. The Sun M13II is a good rim for this.

    When fixed you want to remove the rear brake or disengage the cable. This is for safety reasons. A rear brake on a fixed gear can be dangerous unless you are really really careful and used to that configuration. A rear brake is really not needed though since you legs can do the braking for the rear end and your front brake will take care of the front braking. Your front brake is already about 80% of your braking power anyway.

    A rim is probably about $40 to $50. Then $1 per spoke and $45 labor. If you rim is in perfect shape we could re-use that. Anything less than perfect and you should get a new rim.
    • CommentAuthorkyle
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2010
     
    Thanks for the info, Sky! I have a 700c wheel on another bike that I can drop in to see if the brakes will reach. If it doesn't fit, then I'll consider whether I want to remove the brake and throw the 700 on there or build up a 27 inch wheel.

    I realize that I wouldn't want to use the rear brake on it fixed, but I intend to test the water a bit before making too many changes to the bike; I never use my rear brake, so whether it's on there or not shouldn't really matter. Good call on disengaging the cable as a safety precaution.
  2.  
    bikingbill:Afine 11 Speed Hubs are available now...

    http://blog.harriscyclery.com/alfine-11-speed-hubs-in-stock/

    I wonder if Alfine11 is heavier than the Nexus7?
    Recently, I installed a Nexus 7 IGH and Shimano Dynamo hub with the Xenon lamp. This new wheelset feels like it's 3 times as heavy compared to the original wheelset+rear derailleur that came with the Cruzbike. I'm still test riding it to decide to keep this setup or not. I like the visual simplicity and the ability to shift at a full stop
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     
    I'm pretty sure the Alfine11 is heavier than a Nexus7. It's huge. It is much improved though, oil bath and all of that.

    I'm thinking of a Alfine Dynamo Hub, as in tests it did very well compared to the very expensive SON:

    http://www.thebikebiz.com/Articles.asp?ID=153



    I've seen the Alfine for as low as $90
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     
    Interesting. It's something to consider. The SON's have only slightly lower rolling resistance but cost almost three times as much. I am a bit curious about durability.
    • CommentAuthormfutch
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     
    The new wheels are rolling straight and shiny. No more rusty wobblies! Although my girlfriend was a little sad, she told me after that it made her happy that her wheels were shinier than mine...

    Thanks Sky!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     
    Haha, you're welcome. Glad you're happy.

    Oh, and I'm pretty sure everybody's wheels where shinier than yours. :face-monkey:
    • CommentAuthorAlanKHG
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010 edited
     

    Because my fork crown is pretty narrow (probably designed for a racing-thickness rim) and my rims are pretty wide (Mavic A319) the back side of my brake pads doesn't fit into my front fork, so the pads are mounted backwards. Thus despite being toed-in they scream like banshees whenever I come to a stop using my front brake, which is a bit embarrassing coming off the freeway or down a big hill.

    Can I do anything about this? Are there any pads even skinnier than the Kool Stops (which were already a narrower replacement put in by the shop installing the fork)?

    Also, the crown is a bit narrow to fit my SKS front fender. I think I'll just cut a couple hunks out of the side of the fender. Any better routes that anyone's tried before?
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010
     
    The Sunlight pads are pretty thin. I'm running those on the back right now and they work pretty well.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010
     
    You may just need a wider fork or skinnier rims. If those pads don't fit I doubt anything else will fit even if they are 1mm thinner.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010
     
    The cartridge pads from a dual-pivot sidepull brake?
    • CommentAuthorAlanKHG
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010
     
    Hmm, I grabbed a set of road pads at the swap. I ought to try them. It'd be quite an effort to find another fork (this one was extremely fortuitous to find in the first place). I do have a decent Open Pro wheel back home in WI that I could see about grabbing at Christmas.
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2010 edited
     
    I just recently learned that my vintage Norwegian Kombi-lux splitable bike has a F&S Torpedo Duomatic rear hub
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2010
     
    markphilips:... my vintage Norwegian Kombi-lux splitable bike has a F&S Torpedo Duomatic rear hub.
    Ahhh, those bring back memories - every time you brake, you also shift into the other gear...took awhile to get used to, AFAIR!
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeDec 19th 2010
     
    That would drive me crazy.
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeDec 21st 2010
     
    I'm converting the mb-1 to a single speed.
    My plan is to use the existing lx cassette hub with spacers and a single sprocket in back and a single chain ring on the vintage xt triple up front.
    I am crossing my fingers that I won't need a chain tensioner but I have a surly singleator on hand if needed, or maybe a half-link?
    I've got some sprockets to work with and I know I need lots of spacers.
    I also know that chainline is very important.
    Anything else to consider?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 21st 2010
     
    We have the spacers at the shop. The likelyhood of getting the magic gear that will not need a pensioner is unlikely. Sometimes if you are really lucky it works out but most of the time it doesn't. Even if it does the chain will stretch and there goes the perfect adjustment. A singleator will work but the cleaner and nicer way to go is with the White Industries ENO hub. I think I have a ENO wheel lying around actually from one of my old bikes. It costs quite a bit more but is really nice.

    Another consideration is if you are planning to use a cassette gear in the back. If you are those are thin and tend to strip the cassette body's splines under a heavy load. It's best to buy a new gear that is meant for the task. It would be thicker at the base where the splines are. They don't cost that much. Other than that go for it. Single speeds can be a blast.
  3.  
    I picked up a Forte Single-speed Conversion kit a while ago. But I've only used the chain tensioner with a Nexus IGH experiment. It's a neat package with new gears and spacers. It's very affordable.

    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 21st 2010
     
    Mark, those cogs are too thin. There's not enough width to the spline and you risk damaging the spline of the hub. It's best to buy a Surly cog for that arrangement.

  4.  
    Thanks for that advice. I bought the Forte kit for the chain tensioner. So I have not used the cogs that came with it...
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeDec 22nd 2010 edited
     
    billd:Just curious. Why do you want to switch to downtube shifters?


    I recently got a bike with down tube shifters and..at first wasn't to keen on them. Now, I'm pretty happy with them. Just makes things fun.

    Mine are index shifting too.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeDec 22nd 2010
     
    PacMUle:............QUESTION: looking into a new wheel set... dont know all that much so i was hoping i could get some input from some of you folks here...
    1) hubs? ... so far it looks like the best value for the money are either, Dura Ace, Chris King, or Velocity.... ???


    I have King hubs on one bike and phil woods on another and now a hub with dura ace.

    I also have a miche hub that rolls as good as any of the above and was much, much cheaper. Consider the Miche' hubs.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeDec 22nd 2010
     
    William.:
    PacMUle:............QUESTION: looking into a new wheel set... dont know all that much so i was hoping i could get some input from some of you folks here...
    1) hubs? ... so far it looks like the best value for the money are either, Dura Ace, Chris King, or Velocity.... ???


    I have King hubs on one bike and phil woods on another and now a hub with dura ace.

    I also have a miche hub that rolls as good as any of the above and was much, much cheaper. Consider the Miche' hubs.


    thanks man, i appreciate that!
    • CommentAuthorSDAirBrush
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2010
     
    I want to convert my roadbike 105 flight deck 9 speed shifters to mountain bike style trigger shifters. Do I need to replace the cables? I have a 105 rear derailleur. Any recommendations on decent shifters? Thanks!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2010
     
    So you are going to a mountain bike strait bar? Any Shimano 9 speed mountain bike trigger shifters will do the job. The cables are the same. MTB shifters will work just fine with the 105 rear derailleur. The front derailleur is the issue. Mountain bike front derailleurs and road bike front derailleurs work on a different cable pull rate. You may want to consider Paul Thumbies. The Thumbies are expensive after you buy the Dura Ace shifters that go with them but they work incredibly good and they also work with the derailleurs you have. Trigger shifters take a backseat to Thumbies, I've ridden all of them for more miles than I can count. Two of my modern mountain bikes have been switched to Thumbies, my custom Curtlo 29er and my Santa Cruz Superlight.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeDec 25th 2010
     
    ok guys i need your HELP!!! and quick cuz i dont think this deal will last long... i think i found a set of wheels to replace those crazy spinergy rev-x things... but the cassette is a 9 gear on a lil bit older dura ace hub... i currently have a have a shimano 8 speed cassette wit dura ace integrated 8sis derailleur... not sure exactly what years... and this is gonna sound really naive, but my downtube shifter only has 8 clicks on it... ??? will this wheel set fit??? or do i need new shifters and or derailleures?

    i can put up pics if ya need 'em... i would really appreciate the help!!!
    • CommentAuthorjebiker
    • CommentTimeDec 25th 2010
     
    Jason, all you need to do is put your 8 speed cassette on the new wheel. It will fit no problem.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2010
     
    I just finished (this morning) waxing a chain via the melted wax method, as for christmas I got a crock pot and wax.

    It was pretty interesting and the chain spins pretty smooth.

    Cons: Labor intensive, potentially dangerous and..people thing you're crazy.

    Pros: chain spins smooth and quiet and if cleaned well, you can white glove it and the chain is lubed well.

    Long term unknown versus some of the new/better lubes out there.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2010
     
    Has anyone tried building a chain with ceramic bearings?
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2010
     
    Is ChainL really just heavy weight motor oil? Am I the only person that thinks this...?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2010
     
    It smells like Transmission oil if you ask me. It's a lot thicker than motor oil or trans oil though. Read this
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2010