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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2011
     
    I used to weigh over 300lbs in the late 1980's and early 1990's. Wheelsmith in Palo Alto built wheels up for my Miata 1000LT that never went out of true. I used to build wheels and some knowledge of the physics of this, and I believe that if you get well tensioned spokes you're distributing the forces over more spokes more evenly. In High School I build wheels for tubular rims that were light and tough via that.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2011 edited
     
    All this talk of wide tires has made me wonder how wide I could actually get for the current bike in road tires. It looks like Panaracer makes a Pasela Tourguard FOLDING (!) tire in 700x35 for around $30 online. Anybody know of a local vendor? I may have to mail order this one. Not sure if it will fit my bike, especially with my newer somewhat narrow fenders, though they do seem to have a fair amount of clearance from the tire. I figure that 10mm wider than my current 700x25's means it will have about 5mm longer radius measured from the center of the axle as well, or am I thinking of that wrong? I may be limited to pumping up this tire on the bike, as I'm not sure my brakes will open up enough to let these through inflated, even with the cable disengaged. I have to disengage the cable just to get inflated 700x25's through.

    I also found Schwalbe Marathon XR HS 359 700x35 folding, though it's considerably more expensive at $57 online.

    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 700x40 folding $70 online. I'm pretty sure I'd have to remove my fenders to get this one in at all and there's no way they're going through the brakes inflated. Very pricey too.

    I hate wire beads.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2011
     
    Just give the shop a call and we will order those tires in kevlar. We should at least have the steel bead version of the Schwalbe and Panaracer in the shop if you just want to test the sizing. I'm nut sure about the pricing, I'm not at work right now and I will be out of town until Thursday. Alex and Moose can help you out though.
  1.  
    I have my own reputation for destroying wheels... ask any of the wrenches at Mission Hills, Bicycle Discovery, or my friend at Anywhere Bicycle repair.

    Sure, avoiding potholes helps, and no one wants to hit a pothole, but sometimes you've gotta suck it up and who wants to slow their awesome fast ride just 'cause of some cracked pavement?

    I like those Mavic wheels, but I've wrecked that model, and the OpenSport and the Prosport, hand built and machine built.

    Hand built is obviously better, but I do have a favorite rim.

    Its a little heavy, but the Velocity Dyad (I think its meant for tandems) has barely needed truing yet, after 2000 miles+ and a very abusive rider. Mine's handbuilt with Wheelsmith spokes, but I'm not sure their diameter.

    It is my understanding that not all spokes were created equal. Wheelsmith and DTswiss (?) I think are supposed to be the go-to's.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2011
     
    Came across this article on CyclingNews.com where a lab has tested how rolling resistance is impacted by variables such as:

    Tire width
    Wheel diameter
    Thread count
    Thread pattern

    The tests deliver some surprising conclusions that go contrary to conventional wisdom.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2011
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2011
     
    Just got my Lumotec Headlamp to go with my Alfine dynamo hub.

    Cable is too short. What precautions do I need to take when I extend it?

    Also, any suggestions on connecting it to the Alfine would be appreciated.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2011
     
    Found this: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/lighting/shimano.html

    But about extending the cable. I assume as long as I buy suitable wiring, I will be ok.

    Also, if I'm not using a rear dynamo light ... I assume I simply insulate the ends of that wire.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2011
     
    As long as you use appropiate wire and solder the cables together with shrink wrap over the joint you'll be fine.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2011
     
    Sigurd:
    1) Get bigger tires (sidepulls => 28mm max).
    2) Get stronger wheels
    3) ...and increase the spoke count to 36



    Sigur, I"m a big guy, and not exactly careful.

    I have 32 spoke with Deep V's, and I have one wheel with a 36 spoke and a deep V and one 32 hole with a non deep v.

    I'm a fan of Deep V's, I think that they are part of the solution. Wider tires may help a little.

    But, personally, I think it absolutely has to do with the builder. There are 3 - 4 people who have built wheels for me that have lasted through time. The builder matters...
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2011
     
    Got the Lumotec connected to the Alfine with a moles connector for the Biologic accessory charging system. Very impressive headlamp.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 14th 2011 edited
     
    jebiker:Bill the black and grey connector on the hub is a 2 part connector. The grey has 2 holes for the headlight leads and the black is the outer clip if you will.


    Separate the 2 using a small flat head screwdriver. Strip 3/4" of the headlight or Reel charger. Insert the respective ground and positive.


    Fold the bare wires to the outside and put the black clip overtop. and clip to the hub connection.


    It's was easy to have a molex off the main line to the lamp.

    The Reelcharger's regulator isn't supposed to be connected to the dynamo when not charging, there's a warning about that. I could have done a switch, but molex is less likely to be connected in error.

    This is a Shimano hub, so there's the "lego" type connector to it. I don't see a secondary connector.

    The Lumotec is pretty impressive.

    My only disappointment is that the "handlebar mount" won't fit on the recumbent's "boom crossbar" I have that puts the light low and in front on the bike, so it's mounted on the handlebar which I don't like.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 14th 2011
     
    That light (Lumotec) is worth it. Really lights up the road. Doesn't flicker until I get to <4mph, and even then ,,,, it's GREAT!
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011 edited
     
    My downtube shifter bolts come loose due do vibrations from riding, which cause the derailers to slip down to their default sprocket/chainwheel and shifters to become nonoperable. How do I prevent such slippage?

    Also, the little half-ring used for adjusting the bolt firmness on one of the downtube bolts is broken off: Does anybody have a spare bolt? The bolt is for downtube shifters that attach to bosses on the downtube.

    Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011 edited
     
    Depending on what shifters you have I probably have one of those D rings for you.

    To prevent this happening check for tightness once in a while or add very very very light loctite to the threads. Maybe even just spoke prep to the threads. You can just swing by and use a drop of it if you like. That would be a good time for you to see if we have a D-ring for you too. We have probably 100 or more down tube shifters in a drawer.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011 edited
     
    bikingbill:That light (Lumotec) is worth it. Really lights up the road. Doesn't flicker until I get to <4mph, and even then ,,,, it's GREAT!
    I am starting to get seriously curious about those hub dynamos...

    At my last SD Rando brevet, another rider in a PBP jersey riding a fully touring equipped LHT made his way through the throng of 10lbs crabon fibre bikes up to me during a rest stop. He was very complimentary about my bike setup (I had a touring setup, too), but continued to say that I was missing one critical component on my bike for it to be complete - the hub dynamo.

    So, with all the talk in this thread about hub dynamos, I am getting interested in these lighting systems! Any authoritative source online for information about these light systems? What is VC carrying and recommending?
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011
     
    The Schmidt is the best but the most expensive too. It is bright, reliable, low rolling resistance and has the least amount of vibration. The Lumotec is pretty good too and quite a bit cheaper. I carry all the different styles out there. For commuting and such the Lumotec is fine but for Brevet's and racing where you need the best and absolutely most reliable Schmidt is the way to go.

    Your definitive source for information is Peter White


    I just bought myself a Schmidt setup but have not finished the bike it's going on yet. Soon I hope to be commuting on it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011 edited
     
    I have the new Shimano Alfine Dynamo hub. It's load resistance is greater than the SON, but it's no-load resistance is close. $130 vs $240? It also has Ultegra bearings.

    I have a Biologic Reelcharge wired in as well, I can keep my iPhone charged up (or a GPS unit, if I had one).

    I have the Lumotec Sensor. It automatically has a daylight running lights mode.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011
     
    I'll probably use the Alfine setup for my wifes bike when I start building it back up. I get it back from paint this week.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011
     
    Here's the data:

    http://www.thebikebiz.com/Articles.asp?ID=153

    We like dyno hubs here at The Bicycle Business, but we've wondered for a while how the Schmidt SON (nabendynamo) stacks up against the newer Shimano hubs. All of the data we have seen on hub dynamo reisitance (from Schmidt's website) only compared their hubs to the older Shimano NX-30 hub. We knew acording to Shimano that their newer Alfine, DH-3N72, and DH-3N80 are claimed to have 75% less resistance than the NX-30. So we set up a resistance test. We found that the Schmidt SON is still the best, but the competition has greatly imporved their game.

    The graph below shows the results of our tests of Schmidt SON, Shimano Alfine, and Novatec dynamo hubs. We tested the hubs at 12mph and 18mph both with a light on and off. The first set of data in the graph is the average resistance over the test. The numbers on the left are the watts/kph.



    As you can see the Schmidt dnyo hub still beats out the Shimano, but the Alfine is a huge improvement over the old NX-30. The Shimano DH-3N80, DH-3N72, and DH-3D72 all have the same internals so their resistance should be essentially the same. The Alfine and DH-3N80 have better quality bearings and races than the 72s so their performance will be a little better. The difference between the Alfine and DH-3N80 is the hub shell.

    The tests were done using a bike equiped with powertap on a set of rollers. The same tire and tube were used on all the dyno wheels to try to elimante as many variables as possible, but keep in mind we are curious bike geeks not engineers.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011
     
    I really like my Planet Bike rear Blinky. Do they make a version I can connect to the Dynamo?

    I'm also thinking of re-wiring my GINORMOUS rear tailight to the Dynamo as well. It's a 18 LED affair that runs on 4 AA batteries.

    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011
     
    When rewiring the tail light, you'll want to have some sort of reserve power to keep it on while stopped at stop lights. For that monster, that might take a lot of reserve.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 16th 2011
     
    billd:When rewiring the tail light, you'll want to have some sort of reserve power to keep it on while stopped at stop lights. For that monster, that might take a lot of reserve.


    In flash mode, the batteries last months. The Lumotec Sensor has power-out for the rear light, and it controls the rear light as well.

    Maybe I can put in a capacitor into the lamp as well...
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2011
     
    Since when did Shimano decide to delete barrell adjusters from their deraillurs? Barcons don't have adjusters.

    Luckily Nytro actually knew what a "in-line cable barrell adjuster" was and even gave me one gratis!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 27th 2011
     
    Sigurd:My downtube shifter bolts come loose due do vibrations from riding, which cause the derailers to slip down to their default sprocket/chainwheel and shifters to become nonoperable. How do I prevent such slippage?
    This problem hasn't gone away after having applied spoke prep as per advice: After having operated the D/T shift levers a few times, the shifter bolts come loose and the derailer drops onto default (and takes the chain with it, of course) chainring/sprocket.

    What would be the next step up in order to lock down those bolts? I don't mind if the fix is fairly permanent - it sure beats having the bolt come loose all the time.

    Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2011
     
    Sigurd:
    Sigurd:My downtube shifter bolts come loose due do vibrations from riding, which cause the derailers to slip down to their default sprocket/chainwheel and shifters to become nonoperable. How do I prevent such slippage?
    This problem hasn't gone away after having applied spoke prep as per advice: After having operated the D/T shift levers a few times, the shifter bolts come loose and the derailer drops onto default (and takes the chain with it, of course) chainring/sprocket.

    What would be the next step up in order to lock down those bolts? I don't mind if the fix is fairly permanent - it sure beats having the bolt come loose all the time.

    Thanks.


    There are different versions of loctite, some are less "sticky" than others. But, perhaps better than that, a bit of plumber's tape on the bolt?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2011
     
    William.:...a bit of plumber's tape on the bolt?
    That's a great thought -- will try that!
  2.  
    Blue Loctite is the thread locker commonly used to secure bolts and screws.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2011
     
    The problem is for this particular bolt you can't run anything too strong. Whatever you use needs to be really light.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2011
     
    markphilips:Blue Loctite is the thread locker commonly used to secure bolts and screws.
    Velo Cult:The problem is for this particular bolt you can't run anything too strong. Whatever you use needs to be really light.
    All I know is that spoke prep is not strong enough.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2011
     
    I have not seen this bike yet myself but it makes me wonder if a washer is missing somewhere. if there's a piece missing every time you pull back on the lever it will loosen a hair. After several pulls on it it will loosen up enough to have the derailleur fall with the pull of the spring. Is it just with one side and if so are the guts the same?
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2011 edited
     
    Velo Cult: Is it just with one side and if so are the guts the same?
    Both sides. Seems like the rear got marginally better with spoke prep, but the front is back to limp within a few shifts of having tightened the bolt. The guts look the same, but I haven't taken them apart for close scrutiny.
    • CommentAuthorAlanKHG
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2011
     
    Something is making terrible screeching noises in my drivetrain. Basically, constant twittering. I just oiled the chain (I thought I may have done it too lightly so I topped added a little more oil and wiped it down again). It happens only during pedaling and back pedaling so it has to involve the chain. I tried spinning the BB when I had the chain off & it wasn't noisy. I tried only using one pedal at a time and the noise continued. Does that mean it has to be the jockey wheels?
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2011
     
    Noises are the hardest thing to nail down. You basically just have to narrow it down by replacing parts or re-building parts. Oil the jockey wheels, rebuild the bottom bracket, tighten the cranks, grease your seat post (seriously), be sure the quick release is tight, tighten your chainring bolts, try different pedals, and so on. It can sometimes take forever. Every single time a bike has an noise people automatically blame the bottom bracket but half the time it's something far away like the seat post or even stem. The sound always sounds like the drive train. Not to say it isn't the drive train but keep your mind open to investigating others area's of the bike.
    • CommentAuthorAlanKHG
    • CommentTimeMar 2nd 2011
     
    Caught it, looking at the jockey wheels. I noticed that, when I took my to lube it the first time, I put it back on wrong & had it on the wrong side of one of those steel tabs on the cage, so it did a lot of rubbing. Hopefully I didn't wear anything out too much in the 70 miles or so I had the chain on like that. I had to relube the chain again because I applied the lube thicker after the first ride I heard it squeaking like that, assuming it was underlubricated. That just got it really dirty today.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2011
     
    Tires: my new rim requires a minimum of a 25. So, I'm thinking of going with what's been good: Conti Ultra Gators.. anyone have others they love?
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2011
     
    William.:Tires: my new rim requires a minimum of a 25. So, I'm thinking of going with what's been good: Conti Ultra Gators.. anyone have others they love?


    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme---love em.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2011 edited
     
    yoshi:
    William.:Tires: my new rim requires a minimum of a 25. So, I'm thinking of going with what's been good: Conti Ultra Gators.. anyone have others they love?


    Schwalbe Marathon Supreme---love em.


    +1 on Marathon Supreme
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2011
     
    Love my Marathon Plus tires. Didn't seem to slow me down on Saturday's Pub Crawl either.
    • CommentAuthorWilliam.
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2011
     
    Sturmey Archer SX3 3 speed fixed gear hub: does anyone know about this; quality, reliability, ect?

    Someone who works where I do is going to get a bike equiped with one, and I know nothing about it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2011
     
    We have setup bikes with it. It's pretty cool setup. It's reliable enough but you you need to use brakes on both wheels being extremely careful to never skid the back wheel as this will launch you over the handlebars. You don't want to you your legs to back pedal too hard or skid, it's not designed for that. Use it as it's meant to be used and it's a pretty awesome thing. I'm going to build up a bike for myself with that hub soon. Here's one we built up for Chris Kostman recently.

    http://www.velocult.com/blog/post/raleigh_competition_rivendell_roadeo
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011 edited
     
    What are my options for a set of hoods for these shimano 600 "arabesque" era brake levers?

    Shimano 600 Arabesque brake lever
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011
     
    yoshi:What are my options for a set of hoods for these shimano 600 "arabesque" era brake levers?

    Shimano 600 Arabesque brake lever


    Cane creek makes some nice hoods in a few different colors. I used the black and the brown. The black seemed to hold up better.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011
     
    yoshi:What are my options for a set of hoods for these shimano 600 "arabesque" era brake levers?


    I would have the same question for Suntour Superbe levers:

    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011
     
    The Cane Creek ones are pretty standard for the cable-out-the-top style levers. I've put them on 600's and Suntours. They might not fit like a glove, but it's still better than the aluminum.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011 edited
     
    I have Dia-Comp and Cane Creek hoods that work. Dia Comp makes the Cane Creek hoods but the Cane Creeks come in more color options. They may not fix exactly perfect but they'll be pretty darn close and it will look good.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011 edited
     
    Nobody reproduces these with the proper "Superbe" (or whatever) logo, then? That would be insanely great.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011
     
    No, sorry they don't. Those things are long gone. Most levers have no hoods to match them anymore.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011
     
    First impressions on the Panaracer Pasela Tourguard 700x35's:

    The bead is amazingly tight. I thought racing tires I'd tried were tough. These are really tough to get on. I pinched a tube for the first time in maybe 10 years or more. I'm not sure. I don't remember the last time I pinched a tube when mounting a tire. I had to be a lot more strong arm with the levers than I'm used to.

    After I got them on the wheel and pumped up, they seemed narrower than I expected them to be, but this was apparently an optical illusion. They really are a full centimeter wider than my other tires.

    I put them on the bike and I couldn't get the fenders adjusted with enough clearance. They were rubbing up by the brake, where I can't make more clearance. I removed the fenders. I really chose the wrong fenders. I liked the way that they looked but they're too narrow for these tires.

    I have front facing rear dropouts. I was barely able to get the wheel in while inflated due to this. The brakes had plenty of room when disengaged.

    These still have a recommended pressure of 90psi, so they're not that soft. Sure, they're softer than that 115-125psi tires that I'm used to, but you still feel the cracks in the road pretty good.

    I can skid the rear wheel a lot more easily than with the 700x25 slicks I'm used to. This is the opposite of what I expected. I'm thinking it may be due to the patterned tread. So far I've felt a little less confident in cornering.

    They are better than the 700x25's on a dirt road, but still not great.

    Only commuted one day so far. The time was roughly inline with a normal commute. It was a little slower than normal on the way home.

    When you put tires that are 1cm wider on your bike, you need to remember that the wheel diameter is around 2cm larger, and you need to adjust your bike computer accordingly. Each rotation of the wheel is worth almost 2.5 inches more travel than before. Hopefully this occurs to you before you ride 10 miles at the wrong setting. :face-plain:
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2011
     
    The air pressure designation on tires is max pressure not recommended pressure. Experiment with lower pressures and see how it goes. I wouldn't drop below 50 with those tires but 60 to 70psi is where I would go with with tires that wide.