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    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2016 edited
     
    Graphene-Laced Bike Tires Are Both Stiffer and Softer
    As enamored as I am with the concept of graphene, it will not be taking me off my Black Chili Continental GP 4000S II road tires anytime soon.
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      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2016 edited
     
    gottobike:Graphene-Laced Bike Tires Are Both Stiffer and Softer
    As enamored as I am with the concept of graphene, it will not be taking me off my Black Chili Continental GP 4000S II road tires anytime soon.


    Well into my second set of the new graphene Corsa G+. They are fast as hell, fairly durable (2200-ish miles/4 flats) and as anyone who plays Bike-o-rama knows, the gum walls look classy as hell.
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2016
     
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 7th 2016
     
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 11th 2016
     
    I am looking to convert a classic (fully rigid) mountain bike to drop dirt bars: Who, or which bike shops, in San Diego can provide quality advice on such conversion?

    I need help with decisions such as bar, stem and lever make/models, as well as bar and stem dimensions - thanks for ideas.
  1.  
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      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2016
     
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2016
     
    batmick:
    Shut Up Legs:Cycle Quest?
    That would have been my first pick as well. The guy knows his stuff.
    http://www.cyclequestsd.com/

    Good to know - I will talk with them.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2016
     
    Sigurd,

    Are you converting your '86 Stumpjumper? I think for geometry considerations, there are many forums where conversions have been discussed (search "MTB drop bar conversion"), and you could also check out the geometry of bikes such as the 26" wheel Surly LHT:

    http://surlybikes.com/bikes/long_haul_trucker

    I understand that getting the geometry right can be a challenge. I've spent a fair amount of time trying to get road and mountain components to work together, and it can be a challenge. I think the typical way people deal with MTB/drop bar component compatibility is to use bar end friction shifters, though there might be some other options now that allow STI shifting if you're willing to buy a new drivetrain.

    Are you set on 26" wheels? If you're willing to consider new or "recent used," particularly 29er/700c, you might be pretty happy with some of the offerings from Salsa/Surly/Soma, or maybe Black Mountain Cycles in Marin (http://blackmountaincycles.blogspot.com/). Many other more mainstream manufacturers have put out steel 29ers over the past 10-12 years, as well, including Raleigh, Kona, Marin, GT, etc.
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2016
     
    Shady John:Sigurd,Are you converting your '86 Stumpjumper?
    Yes. It's not much of a "mountain" bike, anyways, by modern standards, so I might as well have some fun with it and focus on uses around gravel and dirt roads. I would of course keep the current bar setup, so the conversion is entirely reversible without any fuss.

    Sky is sending me some original WTB MTB dirt drop bars and Barcons. So what I need some guidance on is, I think:

    - What kind of stem and dimensions (1" threaded)
    - What kind of levers (need to work with cantis

    This is the sort of thing I am going for:

    • CommentAuthorerik
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2016
     
    Yes. It's not much of a "mountain" bike, anyways, by modern standards, so I might as well have some fun with it and focus on uses around gravel and dirt roads. I would of course keep the current bar setup, so the conversion is entirely reversible without any fuss.

    Sky is sending me some original WTB MTB dirt drop bars and Barcons. So what I need some guidance on is, I think:

    - What kind of stem and dimensions (1" threaded)
    - What kind of levers (need to work with cantis

    This is the sort of thing I am going for:

    Levers for cantis are pretty easy. Any road lever should work. Just make sure you get the right yoke height/pad angle. Sometimes when you go from mountain brake levers to road brake levers you have to shift that around a bit to get the most mechanical advantage. If you want Vs, that is a different story.

    For this kind of conversion, I usually go with a threaded to threadless stem adaptor. It makes it much easier to find the right stem length. If you want to keep a more classic look, you will need to do some careful thinking to get the right stem geometry, but if you can use threadless stems you can swap things out pretty easily. I happen to like the look of modern, threadless stems on beefier frames like mountain bikes, so I never have a problem with this, but I know some people like to keep their threaded stems looking threaded.

    Either way, you probably want to bring the bars up and in compared to the mountain geometry. I always found that counter-intuitive, but it makes sense considering that drop bars intrinsically stretch you out more than flat bars. Nitto makes the MT-10, which I think was designed for this kind of thing. There must be others out there though.
  2.  
    Tour de France Champion Greg LeMond Signs Groundbreaking Carbon Fiber Agreement with Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    New manufacturing process yields high volume, low cost carbon fiber for transportation, renewable energy, and infrastructure
    August 29, 2016 businesswire.com
    OAK RIDGE, Tenn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Three-time Tour de France champion Greg LeMond is partnering with carbon fiber manufacturing pioneer Connie Jackson and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to bring the most significant development in carbon fiber production in over 50 years to the global markets.

    LeMond Composites, a new company offering solutions for high-volume, low-cost carbon fiber, has secured a licensing agreement with U.S. Department of Energy’s ORNL. The agreement will make the Oak Ridge-based LeMond Composites the first company to offer this new industry-disrupting carbon fiber to the transportation, renewable energy, and infrastructure markets.

    A breakthrough process invented by Jackson and a research team at ORNL’s Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF) will reduce production costs by more than 50% relative to the lowest cost Industrial grade carbon fiber. Incredibly this new carbon fiber has the mechanical properties of carbon fiber costing three times as much. Until now, manufacturing carbon fiber was an extremely energy-intensive process. This new method reduces energy consumed during production by up to 60%.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2016
     
    That will be important for the large wind turbines. Reduction in cost of those, which already are one of the cheapest electrical generating sources, could be a tipping point.
  3.  
    More carbon fiber for everyone!
    Greg's gonna make a shitload of dough
    Im curious what the breakthrough was, 50% and more in savings?
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2016
     
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2016
     
    Product | COBI
    https://www.cobi.bike/product?_ga=1.90347804.767114061.1474074602
    COBI is helping to revolutionize the overall cycling experience by connecting your smartphone to your bike. This award-winning modular system brings out the best in any bike by providing it with intelligent assistance. The result is more safety, convenience and fun – no matter where your journey takes you.

    Smartphone mount with headlight/taillight, battery pack, available dyno-hub charging cable, electronic bell, alarm system, nav and weather. Very smart!
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2016
     
    gottobike:Product | COBI
    https://www.cobi.bike/product?_ga=1.90347804.767114061.1474074602
    COBI is helping to revolutionize the overall cycling experience by connecting your smartphone to your bike. This award-winning modular system brings out the best in any bike by providing it with intelligent assistance. The result is more safety, convenience and fun – no matter where your journey takes you.

    Smartphone mount with headlight/taillight, battery pack, available dyno-hub charging cable, electronic bell, alarm system, nav and weather. Very smart!


    Kind of cool, but no thanks. My smartphone resides deep inside a backpack, or in a jersey pocket zipped inside a thick ziplock bag. If my phone rode out on the handlebars it would be cracked and splintered within a matter of days or weeks.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2016 edited
     
    Good point, Shady John. With many of today's more common smart phones, it does seem like the COBI would be geared more to an uptown style of flair weather riding. If durability of the smartphone is the limiting factor, maybe it's time for something a little more rugged?

    Best Rugged Smartphones (Unlocked) 2016
    http://www.toughgadget.com/best-rugged-smartphones-unlocked/

    These are not cheap; however, with the 6/6+ running 6-800 USD and then another ~200 USD to replace the flimsy touch screen every few months, one of these ruggedized phones may be a better choice, especially if it is using an internal waterproofing technology like HZO http://www.hzo.com and subscribes to ingress protection standards.
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      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2016
     
    I've been using this case/mount combination for a couple of months now and really like it. Tested the waterproofing in one of the few rainstorms we had earlier in the year and dropped it once at about 5mph because I had taken it off the holder while riding.

    Not sure if I would trust my iPhone 6s to it for real off-road action but fire roads etc. shouldn't be a problem.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00VZGTQZ8
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2016
     
    batmick:Not sure if I would trust my iPhone 6s to it for real off-road action
    Pretty sure I wouldn't trust myself not checking my phone every two minutes...
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      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2016 edited
     
    Sigurd:
    batmick:Not sure if I would trust my iPhone 6s to it for real off-road action
    Pretty sure I wouldn't trust myself not checking my phone every two minutes...


    Good point. But I use mine as a cycle computer after my Garmin died, so I needed something to have it in front of me and weather-protected. So I am constantly checking it but, so far, I have been able to resist the temptation of email.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2017
     
    Capitan Obvious: Replacing Warped Rotors makes you go FASTER

    Longish story.

    My Bacchetta Giro recumbent originally came with BB5 disc brakes. Long and fast descents glazed the pads and warped the rotors.

    This was replaced with BB7's. The pads held up fine. The rotors appeared to be fine, but it was always a compromise between no-contact (rubbing) and braking effectiveness. Then last week some rider on a recumbent trike was pulling wheelies (riding on two wheels) just before the start of a ride, and managed to crash into my rear wheel.

    Tried to find a replacement, ended up having to buy two new wheels AND new rotors, as these wheels were not 6-bolt ones.

    The shop (Adams Ave) suggested better rotors (thicker) and that was that.

    So, yesterday on a ride I decided to push in on one stretch and set a PR:

    https://www.strava.com/activities/855243706/segments/20836837236

    23.7mph average and I wasn't pushing it that hard. Prior PR was 20.8mi/h in 2012.

    The new wheels (from Adams Ave. Bikes):



    Oh these are Deore hubs sans ratchets. They use some sort of clutch mechanism for coasting. That should be an interesting experiment.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    Has anyone tried the Compass "supple" tires?

    I've ridden Panaracer Paselas for many years and was curious how the casing of the Compass compares.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017
     
    t.e.d:Has anyone tried the Compass "supple" tires?

    I've ridden Panaracer Paselas for many years and was curious how the casing of the Compass compares.


    They ride great, but the ones I had (26") had a tread pattern that make a lot of noise above 20mph. So I switched to slicks. Since then Compass has changed to a better pattern.

    I do think Compass makes some amazing tires, and when the stock of these slicks run out ... I'm going to try these ... probabily tubeless:

    https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/tires/26-inch/compass-26-x-1-8-naches-pass/
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2017
     
    bikingbill:
    t.e.d:Has anyone tried the Compass "supple" tires?

    I've ridden Panaracer Paselas for many years and was curious how the casing of the Compass compares.


    They ride great, but the ones I had (26") had a tread pattern that make a lot of noise above 20mph. So I switched to slicks. Since then Compass has changed to a better pattern.

    I do think Compass makes some amazing tires, and when the stock of these slicks run out ... I'm going to try these ... probabily tubeless:

    https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/tires/26-inch/compass-26-x-1-8-naches-pass/


    Thanks, Bill. Is there a shop locally that carries the Compass tires? I really just want to feel the tire to get an idea of the difference between the Paselas (Besides about $50) since they're both made by Panaracer.
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2017
     
    t.e.d: Is there a shop locally that carries the Compass tires?
    I am pretty sure MJ's Cyclery (Park and Uni) orders them, but I am not sure if they carry any inventory - I would check with them.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2017
     
    I had to mail order them. I still have the 26'ers in my garage, not worn down ... but I knew with that volume of sound I was losing watts ... and Strava pretty much verified this with various PR's.

    I had 559-32's Panaracers and they were FAST. But I wore the rear to threads in about 1000 miles.

    That happens on the climbs. Big rider + double digit grades + heavy bike + cargo = rear tire wear.
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      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2017
     
    Sigurd:
    t.e.d: Is there a shop locally that carries the Compass tires?
    I am pretty sure MJ's Cyclery (Park and Uni) orders them, but I am not sure if they carry any inventory - I would check with them.


    MJ's will order. They come in 2-3 days and you'll save shipping. I just got some Switchback Hills that way.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2017
     
    QUARQ SHOCKWIZ
    https://www.quarq.com/shockwiz
    Just heard about this from ABR today.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeJul 19th 2017
     
    Can anyone recommend a spot to fix a broken rear dropout?
  4.  
    t.e.d:Can anyone recommend a spot to fix a broken rear dropout?

    What is the frame material?

    If it's steel, check out Hub & Spoke Cycleworks in National City (right off of the 5 next to the naval base).
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    JayOtheMountains:
    t.e.d:Can anyone recommend a spot to fix a broken rear dropout?

    What is the frame material?

    If it's steel, check out Hub & Spoke Cycleworks in National City (right off of the 5 next to the naval base).


    Yeah, steel dropout. I'll call them. Thanks!
  5.  
    Joe Bell in Spring Valley
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTime6 days ago
     
    Hub and Spoke did an incredible job repairing and color matching a broken dropout on my Stumpy:

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BLAJxN5DuUa/?taken-by=sdbikecommuter
    https://www.instagram.com/p/BM4b4AqDHFX/?taken-by=sdbikecommuter

    Joe Bell, as well, of course.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTime3 days ago
     
    Sigurd:Hub and Spoke did an incredible job repairing and color matching a broken dropout on my Stumpy:

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BLAJxN5DuUa/?taken-by=sdbikecommuter
    https://www.instagram.com/p/BM4b4AqDHFX/?taken-by=sdbikecommuter

    Joe Bell, as well, of course.


    That looks like great work. I recomended them to my friend with the broken dropout. I'll look up Joe Bell as well.

    Thanks for the help!