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    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009 edited
     
    I've been to Amsterdam, and was impressed. But this little video in Copenhagen really blew my mind. I'm sure lots of folks have been there, but if more people saw this, they might get more ideas about riding for transportation, and maybe leave the car for once-a-week duties. If only more San Diegans would just stop driving one day a week...


    " Copenhagen Video"
    • CommentAuthorsurlygurl
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009
     
    Wish SD were like that!

    Did anyone else notice the lack of helmets? I think there were 3.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009
     
    My friend observed that here in the States, we wear helmets and don't follow traffic laws - but people in the video don't wear helmets and seem to follow the laws. Helmets are a big topic for debate. I usually wear one here in town. I'm least likely to wear one when I have my 3 speed on the bike path, or take out the singlespeed for coffee. I have no excuse. I know how to ride a bike, but I certainly don't trust drivers here. Somewhere like Copenhagen has a critical mass of cyclists that have heightened drivers awareness. Anyway, worst San Diego example of riding: Pacific Beach; beach cruiser; no helmet; riding on the sidewalk; going the wrong way. Add a phone call, texting, or a little dog and you have the perfect storm. That happens all the time!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2009 edited
     
    great to see all those city bikes being used for daily chores. anyone notice how fit the citizens are??

    on the same note, has anybody heard of Ciclovia? watch this whole video, if Colombia can do it why can't we??

    " Ciclovia"
    • CommentAuthorsurlygurl
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2009
     
    Speaking of helmets, we need some like this:

    http://www.yakkay.com/index.html

    Well, the girls do, I don't think guys would wear them. At least you can add a little style when riding.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2009
     
    i sent Yakkay an e-mail. i'll see if i can be the first and only USA dealer for their products.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2009
     
    surlygurl:Speaking of helmets, we need some like this:

    http://www.yakkay.com/index.html

    Well, the girls do, I don't think guys would wear them. At least you can add a little style when riding.


    Definitely for the ladies, but they are good looking.
    • CommentAuthorEndorphin
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2009
     
    I have heard of that Columbia bike thing before. I heard that it took a rough dangerous city and totally turned it around all though cycling and sports. It made the population happier and more involved in their community. Thats so cool. We really really need "bike people" in our government.
    • CommentAuthoruno-speedo
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2009
     
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2009
     
    thanks uno, those photos on that blog are fantastic. seeing people on bikes dressed for work and dressed in formal clothing is great.
    • CommentAuthorTom@VC
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2009
     
    Ugh! I always see stuff like that and think about how we have it all wrong over here.

    Its silly to complain instead of taking action though so I will stop there.

    My grandma on my moms side is Dane though so maybe I'll see if we have any relatives left over there.
    • CommentAuthorsurlygurl
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2009 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorsurlygurl
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2009 edited
     
    One more:

    the slow bicycle


    (I obviously have too much time on my hands today)
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2009
     
    Slow bicycling - now that's something I do well.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2009
     
    The video on Copenhagen bicycling was fantastic! Thank you for posting. I am not the most stylish person, but I really would love to own the Yakkay.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeFeb 25th 2009
     
    the Yakkay people said they would tell me as when they are setup to import into the USA. i'll carry the womens helmets for sure.
  1.  
    Velo Cult:great to see all those city bikes being used for daily chores. anyone notice how fit the citizens are??
    on the same note, has anybody heard of Ciclovia? watch this whole video, if Colombia can do it why can't we??
    " Ciclovia"



    San Francisco had there Sunday streets (Ciclovia) last summer. I heard LA is planning to have one for 2010. A Facebook group was created for San Diego Sunday streets. Join the group and spread the word.

    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=45215003750&ref=ts
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2009
     
    Thats cool
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009 edited
     
    More vids from Copenhagen:
    A City of Citizen Cyclists from ABillionBikes. Notice Copenhagen's Cycle Policy in encouraging cycling for daily transport and other benefits. To top that they spend an equivalent of 3M English pounds a year for cycling infrastructure.

    That is roughly $4.8M USD!
    Does anybody know the funds set aside for San Diego's cycling infrastructure?
    PDX is $500K
    LA?

    Part 1 Part 2
    Part 3 Part 4
    Part 5
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2009
     
    Those videos were amazing.

    The bike messengers as usual have a special place in my heart. Little rascals that they are.
    • CommentAuthorSerge
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2009
     
    The thing about Copenhagen (like Amsterdam and many other Northern European so-called cycling meccas) is that cycling was ingrained in the culture before the facilities were created. Here is the 1937 travel movie about the city riddled with bikes mixing with cars, and virtually no bike-specific segregated facilities:

    Amsterdam, Copenhagen, even Davis and Portland (and SF to the extent that cycling is gaining popularity there), are all examples of the popularity of cycling achieving the political momentum and will to invest resources towards bike-specific travel facilities. They are not examples of facilities that created a cycling culture. What's exciting about San Diego is that we seem to have an organic cycling culture starting to grow, despite the big hurdles of relatively long typical trip distances and relatively hilly terrain. It's not Copenhagen of 2009 or 1937, but it is a cycling mecca in its own way. We just have to get the word out! Serge
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2009 edited
     
    Agreed....Traveltalks - 1937 Copenhagen was posted by Sky in the Video thread.

    I like the fact the early on the European cities above put people and sustainable transportation and improving the mobility of bicycling first then automobiles second. Check out the latest video from Streetfilms on Copenhagen's Climate Friendly, Bike Friendly Streets

    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2010 edited
     
    I found these YouTube clip from Clevercycles' blog. My advance apologies to our European friends, I included these videos here to keep it in one thread.

    Amsterdam 1965


    Netherlands 1950s



    LINKER to FLIKR
    A typical Monday morning commute in Amsterdam Nov 2009
  2.  
    svelocity:
    surlygurl:Speaking of helmets, we need some like this:

    http://www.yakkay.com/index.html

    Well, the girls do, I don't think guys would wear them. At least you can add a little style when riding.


    Definitely for the ladies, but they are good looking.


    Both me and my fiance have one, although I do alternate my Yakkay and my Bern. Definitely NOT just for the ladies.
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeMay 12th 2010 edited
     
    SKY, Thanks for posting the bicycle rush hour in the Video Thread

    Bicycle rush hour in the Netherlands. Some of the snow covered bikes reminded me of one Toronto winter where it snowed so much I had to dig out my bike from so much snow.

    Fellow San Diegans, what's your excuse for not riding your bike?

    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2010
     
    markphilips:Fellow San Diegans, what's your excuse for not riding your bike?
    I bike commute every day, so I don't need to make an excuse. I don't let the rain stop me. We don't get snow, but I don't think I'd let it stop me if we did.

    Nice video. It's nice to see that it wasn't just a few hardy individuals but all sorts of people.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBev
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2010
     
    markphilips:Fellow San Diegans, what's your excuse for not riding your bike?

    Migraines, not enjoying riding through the ghetto at 8pm after 9 hours of work and no lunch, hard to ride my bike & carry my dog, ALWAYS running late, my lights suck so that I manage to hit every pot hole possible, I could go on for days......
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2010
     
    markphilips:

    Fellow San Diegans, what's your excuse for not riding your bike?



    Only when I have to fly somewhere for meetings ... and I'm working (Brompton) on that.

    Two years of taxis will pay for it.
  3.  
    Congestion in Copenhagen

    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2010
     
    Yet another Copenhagen bike video podcast: I enjoyed it particularly because most of it is filmed with snow on the ground - leaves us San Diegans with no excuses to not ride because of the weather!
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2010
     
    Njord Noatun:Yet another Copenhagen bike video podcast: I enjoyed it particularly because most of it is filmed with snow on the ground - leaves us San Diegans with no excuses to not ride because of the weather!


    The biggest challenge thrown down by this video came in this statement: "The cycling infrastructure should come to you when you need it. You shouldn't be looking for it or need a map to find it."
  4.  
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    We need to do this. Also, I didn't see any fat people in that video. Someone let Michelle Obama know about that :-)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    I shared this on Facebook.

    The VC folks are already posting about how bad this system is.

    Lies, dammed lies and statistics.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010 edited
     
    Sorry but the VC guys need to come to the realization that it does work. I don't need bicycle infrastructure to ride my bike but the general population does.

    That video focused on two points which are a mainstay in my bicycle discount program. 1) If everybody rides bikes than the drivers will act like cyclists 2) If everybody rides bikes than the politicians will also be riding bikes.

    Cool video.
  5.  
    Velo Cult:

    That video focused on two points which are a mainstay in my bicycle discount program. 1) If everybody rides bikes than the drivers will act like cyclists 2) If everybody rides bikes than the politicians will also be riding bikes.



    straight-up logic.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    The success of cycling in the overall transport mix has to be measured by what proportion of the total transport need is covered by bicycles: Clearly, cities such as Copenhagen and Amsterdam are heads and shoulders ahead of most cities by that measure

    The ideal of VC - no facilities - has been thoroughly tested for the last 50 or 100 years and has -- again by the above measure -- proven a resounding failure: Time to try something else!

    bikingbill:I didn't see any fat people in that video.
    The absence of corn syrup in their day to day nutrition helps, too!:face-monkey:
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    Njord Noatun:The ideal of VC - no facilities - has been thoroughly tested for the last 50 or 100 years and has -- again by the above measure -- proven a resounding failure: Time to try something else!
    Vehicular cycling can't fail if it isn't used in the first place, which it mostly isn't. Most people don't even know what it is. The vast majority of bicyclists don't know what it is.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    Njord Noatun:The success of cycling in the overall transport mix has to be measured by what proportion of the total transport need is covered by bicycles: Clearly, cities such as Copenhagen and Amsterdam are heads and shoulders ahead of most cities by that measure

    The ideal of VC - no facilities - has been thoroughly tested for the last 50 or 100 years and has -- again by the above measure -- proven a resounding failure: Time to try something else!

    bikingbill:I didn't see any fat people in that video.
    The absence of corn syrup in their day to day nutrition helps, too!:face-monkey:


    So well put. Thank you.

    On the corn syrup ... now that it's been tied to pancreatic cancer, let's see if the feds stop subsidizing it.
  6.  
    On the corn syrup ... now that it's been tied to pancreatic cancer, let's see if the feds stop subsidizing it.


    funny joke!
    • CommentAuthorslobiker
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    billd:
    Njord Noatun:The ideal of VC - no facilities - has been thoroughly tested for the last 50 or 100 years and has -- again by the above measure -- proven a resounding failure: Time to try something else!
    Vehicular cycling can't fail if it isn't used in the first place, which it mostly isn't. Most people don't even know what it is. The vast majority of bicyclists don't know what it is.


    I'm one of those people who don't know what VC is. Wikipedia defines it as: "Vehicular cycling (also known as integrated cycling, integrated traffic cycling, cooperative cycling, and bicycle driving) is the practice of riding bicycles on roads in a manner that is visible, predictable, and in accordance with the principles for driving in traffic."

    So if I'm reading this right, the people who advocate vehicular cycling are opposed to the Copenhagen example because of its emphasis on bike lanes and related infrastruture focused on only bikes rather than a system that integrates bikes and car traffic?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    Look, VC techniques are excellent for dealing with mixed traffic. It's worth learning and it does work.

    The thing is, I'd rather cope with Copenhagen's system and the majority of cyclists would as well. You can use stats to 'prove' how bad it is, but I don't buy it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010 edited
     
    Not all vehicular cyclists oppose Copenhagen like separate bike facilities. I consider myself a vehicular cyclist and I do not oppose them.

    Bicycling Street Smarts is a good introduction to vehicular cycling. It's relatively short and has lots of pictures. It's also available online for free.

    There are certainly some vocal vehicular cyclists who do oppose separate bike facilities. They do this based largely upon the feeling that separate bike facilities reinforce the idea that bikes shouldn't be in the road. I believe that more education about bicyclists rights and sharing the road can take care of that.
  7.  
    I would much rather never have to share my riding with multi-thousand pound vehicles than could squash me to a pulp.

    I am good at riding with traffic, but I'm relatively young, healthy, and a very, very big dude. I get a lot more respect in traffic than someone half my size, unfortunate but true. I'll most likely never know what it's like to be a 5' tall female having to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove. Also, when I get older and more frail, I'll definitely moderate where and when I ride to limit my risk much more.

    Big societal changes happen mostly with government intervention. Things like the 'free market' only actually exist in an environment of oversight from parties outside that market, so the idea that society will just think it into place doesn't really work when you have a huge conglomerate of financial interests that profit mightily from cars and choking infrastructure.

    Cyclists belong, and IMO 'sharing the road' is only an unfortunate necessity due to current infrastructure and city planning. Unless we get cyclist awareness in driving education, money, governmental action, etc. cyclists will stay in the roads. I'd much rather have a car lane, a bike lane, and a sidewalk.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010
     
    The 30km/hr speed limit? A great idea.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010 edited
     
    akasnowmaaan:I would much rather never have to share my riding with multi-thousand pound vehicles than could squash me to a pulp.
    Reality is though that there will never be enough separate facilities for everyone to get everywhere they need to go. We're lucky that we get any.
    I'm relatively young, healthy, and a very, very big dude. I get a lot more respect in traffic than someone half my size, unfortunate but true.
    It's true. I'm almost 6' tall but I'm kind of thinly built and big guys do seem to be the ones most likely to try to intimidate me. Two have actually gotten out of their trucks and tried to chase me on foot. I'm pretty sure that steroid rage was involved in both cases.
    Big societal changes happen mostly with government intervention. Things like the 'free market' only actually exist in an environment of oversight from parties outside that market, so the idea that society will just think it into place doesn't really work when you have a huge conglomerate of financial interests that profit mightily from cars and choking infrastructure.
    We do need to find a way to get cycling education into drivers education programs. If anyone has any idea how to go about doing that, please let me know.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2010
     
    I have to agree with other posters here, Strict Liability would be a huge step forward.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2010 edited
     
    akasnowmaaan:I would much rather never have to share my riding with multi-thousand pound vehicles than could squash me to a pulp.

    [snip] I'll most likely never know what it's like to be a 5' tall female having to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove.


    I know I'll probably jinx it now, but I haven't had to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove. I think being a 5'3 woman actually makes people treat me with a little more kindness than they would a 6' man. Sure, occasionally someone honks or says something, but they're usually just clueless, not threatening (at least that's how I choose to take it).
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2010
     
    what's great about the videos from Copenhagen is not just the number of bikes, but the fact that they mix so well with the auto traffic at intersections. There are a lot of cars in those videos - but the drivers drive them with respect and awareness about bicyclists.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2010
     
    Kathy:
    akasnowmaaan:I would much rather never have to share my riding with multi-thousand pound vehicles than could squash me to a pulp.

    [snip] I'll most likely never know what it's like to be a 5' tall female having to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove.


    I know I'll probably jinx it now, but I haven't had to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove. I think being a 5'3 woman actually makes people treat me with a little more kindness than they would a 6' man. Sure, occasionally someone honks or says something, but they're usually just clueless, not threatening (at least that's how I choose to take it).
    Kathy:
    akasnowmaaan:I would much rather never have to share my riding with multi-thousand pound vehicles than could squash me to a pulp.

    [snip] I'll most likely never know what it's like to be a 5' tall female having to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove.


    I know I'll probably jinx it now, but I haven't had to face down a chauvinist asshole with something to prove. I think being a 5'3 woman actually makes people treat me with a little more kindness than they would a 6' man. Sure, occasionally someone honks or says something, but they're usually just clueless, not threatening (at least that's how I choose to take it).


    I don't know if a shorter man would fare as well.

    I've never been harassed when riding my bike. Fear, it seems, must work to some extent.