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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2011
     
    Doesn't the rear 105 have a different spacing then the XT? (135mm vs. 140mm).
  1.  
    130mm vs 135mm... The Crosschecks have their gnot-right spacing at 132.5 to fit mountain or road hubs.
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      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2011 edited
     
    Thanks for the comments.

    Here's the current setup with a Nitto Albatross handlebars with Electra Amsterdam grips, Chris King Aheadset, small Wald basket in front supported by a Sunlite front rack, Zefal rear rack, B17 Flyer (springs) Brooks saddle, Ultegra barcons shifters, Tektro brake levers, XT front and rear derailleur, DH-Alex 19 mm double wall rims and stainless steel spokes, Deore LX hubs, ESGE fenders. Schwalbe Marathons (700x32) and a kick stand.

    Part townie, part touring, part site-seeing, part grocery getter bike. More pictures on FLIKR

    The XCheck is very versatile by design.
  2.  
    I rode the above setup on the Taco Tuesday ride (Balboa Park - La Jolla - Balboa Park) and absolutely enjoyed the fast spirited pace and hill climbing back to the mesa. I think I finally got the bike tuned the way I want it. Thanks for the suggestions and comments. So I will take OKB's suggestion on building a SS from another bike or from scratch...
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      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2011 edited
     
    Latest build. Should be finished in a couple of weeks.

    mockingbird 2011 017

    mockingbird 2011 015
  3.  
    Went out to try the new tires recently. I was able to fit the 650b's on my MB-0 without a problem. The Hetres rode so nicely on the road and the trails!

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      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011 edited
     
    Interesting. Did you have 26" wheels prior to the 650Bs? Just curious as how the brake cantilevers or v-brakes fit with the 650bs.
    Is that trail on the northeast part of Lake Hodges?
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2011
     
    Nice, I'm building up an old Bontrager for myself with 650b wheels now although mine is remaining an MTB with knobby tires. I went ahead and moved the canti posts since it needed new paint anyway. The zip looks nice.
  4.  
    Mark,
    Yes, I previously had 26" wheels on the bike. I didnt have issues with v-brake or canti reach. I had to adjust them of course so that they could reach but both brakes had enough adjustment room. This is the Hodges! Nice call. I decided to check out this trail when I was trying to avoid the Racers and Chasers course.

    Sky,
    Thanks, Tom is a good salesman, he really twisted my arm to buy the Hetres ;)
  5.  
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      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeSep 26th 2011
     
    That is a display rack from Specialized.
  6.  
    Just started the refinishing project on the lady's SST-AL. First step is sanding off all the clear coat so it's down to the bare aluminium. She wants to go with an anodised purple finish. More photos to come.

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  7.  
    3 coats in, one to go then in a day or two the clear coating starts...


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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeSep 30th 2011
     
    lookin nice! :face-devil-grin:
  8.  
    I may have wet sanded a bit too early but using an old sock to polish it up seemed to help. Maybe I'll pick up some polish at ace and go over it tomorrow. Either way, I'm letting it sit in the sun and will be putting it back together tomorrow. So in total it was 4 coats krylon Metal-X annodized purple and 4 coats krylon satin clear with a 1500 grit wet sand at the end.

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  9.  
    So I finished Jennifer's bike this morning. Let me know what you guys and girls think of the new build.

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    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeOct 14th 2011
     
    Here's a teaser photo of my wife's touring bike that I am building right now. It should be done by the weekend.

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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 14th 2011
     
    That bike in the background is my wife's project bike that I'm building for her. Brought it in for adding bar end shifters and final cable-running. I just got the phone call from Josh that it's ready to go, so I'm going to be swinging by in a little bit to pick it up. The turn-around time was perfect, because I wanted her to be able to ride it tonight for Courteous Mass. Velo Cult Rules!
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeOct 14th 2011
     
    I was there when Tom was working on it. He had his nose down and working hard.
  10.  
    mileco:That bike in the background is my wife's project bike that I'm building for her. Brought it in for adding bar end shifters and final cable-running. I just got the phone call from Josh that it's ready to go, so I'm going to be swinging by in a little bit to pick it up. The turn-around time was perfect, because I wanted her to be able to ride it tonight for Courteous Mass. Velo Cult Rules!


    I recognized the bike from the background in tonight's Courteous Mass ride. It looks really good...May I suggest removing the toe-clips (for now) until your wife (Melissa?) gets comfortable with the setup. She almost lost her balance on a stop light while pulling out her feet. She'll get the hang of it eventually (if she chooses to keep the toe clips).

    Gena, my wife, rides her single speed Bianchi mixte with regular plateform pedals and upright swept back bars. She was wearing the white Bern helmet.
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2011
     
    That was one of the things we talked about when we got home. It probably wasn't the best idea to make her initial ride on that bike a group outing, but she has such a blast with this ride that I didn't want to talk her out of it. Many (small) adjustments will follow over then next few weeks. She's never ridden anything other than her beach cruiser, so it'll be a learning curve. She'll be dialed in by next Courteous Mass. Sorry to everyone she nearly took out throughout the evening.
  11.  
    Sky this is an awesome revival from the VC Blog....Just sayin.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2011
     
    Thanks. It's not everyday you can destroy a mid 70's bike and have a bike shop rebuild it for you like that. If only the owner understood the significance of that. Sometimes I wish a friendlier and deserving person got this.
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2011
     
    New additions to the family stable. For those that got the preview of my wife's bike at Courteous Mass, this is with the fenders added now (and toe clips removed for safety).

    The green bike is the red Nishiki I had at last Courteous Mass. The saddle, bar tape, and toe clips are the only additions. Drivetrain remains original. Tires and new cables made it functional.

    The only change I'm going to make to mine is to drop down to 700x35 wheels. The 27" doesn't leave enough clearance for the fenders I want.

    Rode it into work this morning. Biggest smile I've had in a while. And that's what biking is about.
  12.  
    High class!

    Looks like you'll need a rug under the bike to protect the hardwood floors from the bare kickstand. I think there maybe an after market kickstand rubber cover.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2011
     
    Yeah, we stock those rubber boots for kickstands.
  13.  
    mileco,

    Nice looking bikes!

    I like the "color way" on both. The green Nishiki with brown saddle and brown bar wrap, as well as brown gum wall tires look so good together.

    Your wife's blue bike (what make is that?) with the white diamonds contrast is a nice bright, happy looking color combo. The black saddle and bar wrap and the chrome fenders really make it shine.

    Well done. Real lookers for sure! Your big smile :face-devil-grin: is well deserved!



    OKB
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2011
     
    Hers is a Fuji Monterey, mine a Nishiki Riveria (unfortunately, not the GT version). I left the head badge and surrounding area with the original dark-blue color. Same with mine, leaving the Nishiki head sticker and surrounding red area (hard to see in the pic). Kind of a throw-back nod to their roots.

    The argyle pattern on hers didn't come out the way I wanted. It just proved too difficult to paint properly, with light colors and tight pattern. So, I compromised and made stickers with the pattern (dark blue, light blue, light khaki, white, with pink cross-hatch). I then put four layers of clear gloss to seal it in. Only close inspection reveals that it's not paint. Every time she takes it out, she gets rave reviews and compliments. The Hillcrest residents seem to love it most :face-monkey:.

    The white portions on both bikes are hand-painted enamel. I wanted hand-painted for a "classic", weathered look, but knew that it would only look good on detail work. So, her headset and my white details are the only to get this treatment.

    Mark, our condo is rapidly turning into a bike barn (five now in the fleet), and I'm looking into wall hooks. I've been meaning to get that rubber boot for a month now, and haven't gotten around to it. For that matter, I think it's time I get a kickstand for mine. Maybe a trip to VC on Friday will fix my needs . . .
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      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2011 edited
     
    Just picked up a Schwinn CycleTruck. All I know is that it was built between 1939-45(rear exit for axle). Thinking of doing a 50' restoration on it at first, then putting it on the roof of my warehouse, illuminated as a Festivus decoration(after Thanksgiving) for now. Unless of course, somebody needs it to haul a child or two on 'Tweed. It will be beautiful by then.
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      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2011 edited
     
    I did a search on Schwinn Cycle Truck and found this and this. I have always thought it was made in Europe. It's becoming more popular on this side of the pond (search for "Cycle Truck) due to its utilitarian design.

    An image of a restored 1955 Schwinn Cycletruck
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2011
     
    I had one of those a few years ago. They are really meant for hauling things within warehouses. They are extremely slow and don't like hills. Perfect thing for hauling goods around Chicago warehouses or around movie sets in Hollywood. Not really meant to cover a lot of ground. I've always liked them for their look and advertising potential. I believe Chuck has one on display in from of his shop in Carlsbad.
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      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2011 edited
     
    Shy is right on the money.
    Definitely a warehouse bike. At 62 lbs, it's only 2 lbs lighter than my Bakkersfiets, which is a delivery bike. The larger wheels on the Bakkersfiets go over anything, whereas that 20" rim on the CycleTruck can handle more weight, lower the placement of the cargo, and is more maneuverable. I just bought mine as a historical vehicle/art. Narrowed it down to being produced between 1940-41.
    Too bad you don't see these as often as golf carts in the 'States, in warehouse environments. Maybe employee healthcare costs would go down.

    Schwinn stopped production in 1967, but Worksman Cycles is still building these in NYC (since WWII). Current price for a new one? $539. Replace the basket with a metal pizza box, and you're still under $600.
    • CommentAuthorJim
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2011
     
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2012 edited
     
    I finally got around to re-doing my handlebar tape this weekend. I didn't like how it came out the first time, and the electrical tape just seemed like a turn-off on the faux leather Fizik bar tape. After watching a cool video on bar wrapping on the Rivendell website, I saw them using twine as the way to finish off the wrap. It seemed like the perfect fit, so I copied the idea for my bars. I'm still no expert at wrapping, but it's much better than before.
    twine bar wrap
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      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2012
     
  14.  
    I've b been in the mood to change the bike up a bit in time for spring. I painted my stem and pedals with some montana paint (which is awesome by the way) which I mostly use for art projects. I ended up trading a deep v for this guy below, it is also being repainted with montana paint. I'm aware this is the hated ” hipster” wheel but wanted to give you guys a look with the use of this paint.
    image
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2012
     
    I just saw a fixie with that wheel. 10 minutes ago in Encinitas.

    :face-devil-grin:
  15.  
    Yeah I think they are pretty common nowadays. I personally like the look tho.
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2012
     
    do you rattle can this stuff or is it a compressed air thingy like an airbrush or the such?
  16.  
    It's a rattle can. It's intended for Graffiti mainly. It's called Montana Gold, Montana HARDCORE also works great, it's about $10 a can at an art supply store. Totally worth it.
    image
  17.  
    the gold is the matte finish by the way which I generally prefer. I think they have like 130+ colors now too.
  18.  
    Here is the MKS pedals I also painted yesterday. They were originally silver. Same with the cages. For these I used Montana Black which is their high pressure/large area coverage can style. It holds up pretty well even without primer. I'm sure it will get jacked up over time but what part on a bike doesn't.
    image
  19.  
    Alright so here is the wheel just a few hours later. I'm going to let it cure over night but it's looking good so far.
    image
  20.  
    Christmas was good for my business and we all got a sizeable bonus. I was finally able to buy a quality tandem that I've been wanting for me and my daughter. It's a 1980 Santana. CroMoly steel frame, the paint job is in pretty rough shape, but there's no frame rust (thankfully!). I believe most of the parts have been replaced, but they are good quality parts. Phil Woods 48 spoke hubs and bottom brackets, Campy cranks, Sachs freewheel and shifters. The seats definatly need to be replaced, but whoever owned this before me maintained it well, it's just really dirty and needs a good cleaning.

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    We've already taken it on a few rides around North county (101, Elfin Forrest, Del Dios, etc) and it performs great! With the weekend forecast for rain, now it's time to give it an overhaul and heavy cleaning. The cables are starting to get a bit rusty anyways.

    Rear hub. Has threading for a near non existent Woods drum brake (not Arai like I originally thought)
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    Front hub, 1st generation Phil Woods. Needs some navel jelly to get rid of the rust, but not bad for a 40 year old hub.
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    Examples of how dirty this bike is currently -
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    I was considering getting this repainted, but need to have this bike available now to maximize our summer time enjoyment. Perhaps I'll consider that during the winter time.

    I'll post again once cleaning is completed. I'll probably post in the tandem thread instead.....
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2012
     
    Brent,

    I used to have a 1993 Santana tandem, about the same color as yours. We had the Arai drum brake in the rear, which helped, but it wasn't really enough for serious hills. While descending Las Flores Canyon Road in Malibu, we blew a tire off of the rim due to heat buildup from riding the rim brakes. Didn't crash, because we were going slow (therefore, lots of heat buildup in the rims), but it was disconcerting. I think they were 700c x 28 tires, which I know in hindsight was just a bad choice--but we wanted a real "roadie" tandem. If I were to go tandem again I would want disk brakes and fat tires. Or just ride flats or rolling hills. Congrats on getting your daughter out there.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2012
     
    The Phil Wood brake is kind of cool to have but it was not very safe. If would lock up and not release which is why they stopped making it. It's only good as a drag brake and doesn't do much to stop the bike anyhow. Cantilever brakes are the best for tandems. You have Cantilever brakes although there are stronger one's out there.
  21.  
    You two bring up a very good point that I've been wondering about and should ask.

    Since I can't find a drag/drum brake that won't cost more than what I paid for the bike, I'm not considering getting one any more.

    The cantis that are setup on this bike were not specifically made for tandems, but they work quite well. I've seen some dealers sell cantis specifically for tandems. Supposing they are stronger, what real advantage would I get from them? I don't know what 'being stronger' really means? The brakes that I have on now work great, and we've been in situations that test them out well.

    I've heard of heat buildup blowing out tires, and so far I've alternated front and back to give some cooling time while descending (unless we're trying to break our speed record) Works good for auto applications while descending, so I figured that would the best strategy for the tandem.

    Now if there are replacement pads that will help with heat dissipation, I would certainly entertain any suggestions.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2012
     
    Try kookstop pads. I had a white-knuckle descent down Laguna Mt. ( 50+ mph gusts) and rode the brakes the entire way down. Bike 50 lbs and me at close to 230
  22.  
    Brent,

    Here are some images of the brakes on my Nishiki Cresta Touring bike (See page 11 of this thread). I had VC do the work last year and am very happy with the KoolStop Brake Pads they installed. I'm a heaver rider at 250 lbs and often carry a few extra pounds in the panniers. I am very confident in these brakes and took to heart the advice from George when I got the bike back from the shop. "Go easy on the brakes until you get used to how well they grab the rims!" I don't really ride hard enough to generate heat in the rims that might cause tire problems. I also ride on robust touring/city tires that can take a beating.

    ===

    ===

    Nice find on that tandem and good luck getting it up to par. It must be fun to ride with your daughter. That's totally kool!



    Ride well and be safe out there,

    OKB
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2012
     
    Hi Brent,

    It was pretty extreme conditions when we blew off the rear tire. Las Flores is a wicked hill--I think we dropped about 1000 feet in a mile and a half, and there were some twisties so I didn't want to let the bike run.

    http://www.toughascent.com/blog/?tag=las-flores-canyon-rd

    I don't believe changing the brake pads would have much of an effect on heat dissipation, although I'm guessing brake fade could be an issue with lesser pads. We had XT cantilever brakes (probably BR-M737) on our tandem, similar to what you have (are yours LX?). OKB's brakes are classic "non low profile" cantilevers with an effectively much longer lever arm, and should require less pressure on the levers to generate stopping force at the rim. V brakes would also give you better leverage, and they're less likely to squeal than cantilevers, but at the expense of being harder to modulate--more like an on-off switch. I don't recall there being a problem generating enough force to brake effectively, and I had road bars and levers, vs your more effective MTB levers, so I don't think generating enough brake force is an issue for you. In any case, switching to "more powerful" brakes will not substantially affect heat dissipation, and thus will have little effect on the probability of blowing a tire off the rim.