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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2018
     
  1.  


    Escondido City near to building pedestrian transit center bridge

    News Desk June 15, 2018 times-advocate.com
    The city is moving forward with the $325,000 Transit Center Ped Bridge and Spruce Street Channel Improvement Project, whose design is complete, and which is obtaining the final permits from the agencies that regulate impacts on creeks and waterways.

    The bridge will span the Spruce Street Creek that is adjacent to the Sprinter platform. “The bridge is intended to parallel the roadway and span the creek. You’ll note that there’s a makeshift pedestrian pathway within the roadway surface. The construction will pull the pedestrians out of the roadway and put them on a separate bridge that will be out over the creek.”

    The bridge will be about 62 feet long and 9 feet wide. “Right now, the creek has vegetation growing in it and so it will be a nice aesthetically appealing entrance into the transit station from the west,” said Procopio. “It opens the door to the transit station. Now pedestrians have to jut out onto the roadway. Vegetation blocks the creek.” She pointed out that the project includes work to replant the Spruce Street Channel all the way from Valley Parkway to the Escondido Creek.

    This project is part of a much larger $1.2-Million Smart Growth Incentive Program grant (a TransNet-funded program administered by SANDAG) that also includes bike lanes on Quince and Valley Parkway as well as other roadway/drainage improvements for a total construction cost of $1,020,000.
    Not really bike related, but somewhat "commuter" related. Providing safe, utilitarian access to transit stations, separating pedestrians (and bikes) from vehicle traffic on narrow roadways will help to encourage transit usage and last mile alternatives to automobiles. This is very close to the Inland Rail Trail that passes by the Escondido Transit Center.

    (See postings above in Infrastructure: Feb 22nd, 2018; Feb 17th, 2018; Sept 7th, 2017)
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2018 edited
     
    Sigurd:Sounds like Sandag needs to talk with Elon:

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/musks-boring-co-gets-chicagos-nod-for-12-minute-pod-ride-from-loop-to-ohare-2018-06-14

    I would love to see The Boring Company set up shop in Southern Cal.

    We have already seen some pretty impressive local results with undergrounding rail. San Diego's MTS Green Line routes under SDSU and unlike the dismal off-campus NCTD Sprinter station at CSUSM, the SDSU station is located on-campus in the center of where one would want to be. Los Angeles also has several Metrorail routes underground that contribute significantly to the liveability of areas served. For example, the Red line parallels Hollywood Blvd making the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Pantages Theater, etc much more accessible. In fact, my wife and I often select these venues over other options in San Diego and Orange counties because of this convenient rail access.

    SANDAG'land would benefit immensely if the AMTRAK Pacific Surfliner also had tunnel sections. Much of the current track between San Diego and Los Angeles is single track. This requires trains to pull into sidings and wait for trains travelling in the opposite direction to pass... (This is America's second busiest AMTRAK route so please let me repeat this ridiculous statement and highlight in bold, because CAPS RAGE is just too overused.) This requires trains to pull into sidings and wait for trains travelling in the opposite direction to pass.

    Although there has been some recent too little, too late work to add to and extend theses sidings, I do not believe the rail along the beach in San Clemente will ever be double track. So maybe turn left before San Juan Capistrano and punch both a north and south bound tunnel under I-5 to San Onofre?

    And the rail between Sorrento Valley and Mission Bay is speed restricted and routed inland to reduce the steepness of the grade. Why not just bore holes under I-5 and eliminate this dreadfully slow climb?

    I realize there are challenges to every design; however, tunneling is no longer the technological hurdle it once was.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2018
     
    I would also favor undergrounding the rails between Sorrento Valley and Mission Bay. We should also underground I-5, then we can have an uninterrupted trail network stretching from the top of Mt Soledad down to Marion Bear Park and Rose Canyon. That to me would be worth the several billion dollars the undergrounding project would cost. It would also be an excellent chance to test new construction methods to see how such tunnels built directly in a fault zone stand up to moderate-to-major sized earthquakes. On the positive side, if the tunnels hold, then the inevitable landslides off of the east side of Mt Soledad would not have an effect on the roadway, whereas now, such landslides would close I-5 for months, if not years.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2018
     
    In fact, if you really think about it that way--to paraphrase Frank Lloyd Wright--how could you not build it?
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2018
     
    I can see some issues arising with tunnels in a city with a huge homelessness problem.
  2.  

    A sign created by local artists Bob Partlow Terry Weaver and located near the Santa Fe Drive underpass. Photo by Jared Whitlock

    Encinitas approves budgets for Santa Fe Drive, Encinitas Boulevard underpass art
    Aaron Burgin June 21, 2018, thecoastnews.com
    A plan to beautify two prominent underpasses in Encinitas is now fully funded, as the City Council unanimously appropriated nearly $200,000 for the project. The council approved the $192,567 budget addition to pay for the installation of public art along both sides of the Santa Fe Drive and Encinitas Boulevard underpasses, which are currently being overhauled by Caltrans.


    Rendering of improvements planned at Santa Fe Drive. Courtesy SANDAG
    (See posting above Feb 4th, 2018)
    At Santa Fe Drive, the project will include 53 panels of 3-foot-by-5-foot mosaic artwork inset into the new walls at eye level. The mosaics will be created by local high school students and local artists, at a cost of $700 per each mosaic, or $37,100. At Encinitas Boulevard, the city will have professionally made mosaics along four so-called “ground anchor walls,” placed at the on- and off-ramps, at a cost of $155,467.
    Caltrans’ overhaul of the two underpasses is expected to be completed by late 2019, and will include the creation of space for bike lanes and sidewalks at both freeway intersections. Staff this fall will start the application process for the Santa Fe Drive interchange and a request for proposals process for the Encinitas Boulevard interchange. The city’s Arts Commission will evaluate all of the submissions and send recommendations to the City Council.
  3.  
    Progress Update on the Encinitas Segment of the Coastal Rail Trail Bikeway
    Public Safety and Landscaping
    In late-May, construction crews restriped all traffic lanes along San Elijo Avenue and placed concrete barriers along the west side of the road in advance of construction on the Coastal Rail Trail bikeway. The concrete barrier was placed between Santa Fe Drive and Verdi Avenue to establish and protect the construction zone.

    For public safety purposes, parking on the bluff, in addition to walking and jogging on the bluff, along this stretch of San Elijo Avenue are strictly prohibited at all times during construction. Drivers are reminded that vehicle speeds on this section of San Elijo Avenue are reduced to 25 mph during construction, and traffic fines are doubled in construction zones. The concrete barrier is expected to be removed by October 2018. Reduced parking will return at the same time, in the form of parallel parking.
  4.  
    State Council Awards $30 Million for SD Transportation Infrastructure Projects
    Debbie L. Sklar June 28, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    The state Strategic Growth Council Thursday announced almost $30 million in grants for two San Diego infrastructure projects meant to integrate affordable housing complexes and promote sustainable transportation.

    The San Diego Association of Governments was awarded nearly $20 million to install two miles of protected bike lane and more than half a mile of walkway upgrades along Sixth Street and J Street. The project is intended to improve downtown bicycle connectivity with a proposed housing complex near the 12th & Imperial Transit Center that will provide 407 units, including 270 that will be affordable.

    The second grant will award SANDAG nearly $10 million to build more than a mile of walkway upgrades intended to increase pedestrian safety between a school, grocery store, park and proposed housing complex at Keeler Court and Alpha Street. The complex will provide 71 units of affordable multifamily housing.

    The grant also will fund bike infrastructure linking the Southcrest neighborhood with downtown. Overall, the council’s latest round of Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities grants awarded more than $257 million for 19 statewide projects. Apart from lowering greenhouse gas emissions, projects are intended to make public transportation more appealing via proximity.

    “Research shows that people of modest means who live near public transit are more likely to use it, helping them save money and reduce greenhouse gases, which benefits all Californians,” said Ben Metcalf, director of the California Department of Housing and Community Development. “Because these homes remain affordable for at least 55 years, multiple households will be served, allowing families the chance to access opportunities, break the cycle of poverty and begin to build wealth for future generations.”

    To date, affordable home development and other projects awarded through the program will avoid the release of more than 1.5 million metric tons of greenhouse gases, the equivalent of taking 320,000 cars off the road, according to the council.

    –City News Service
  5.  
    From SANDAG Twitter: Link

    How will we get around in 2050? Learn about the 3 types of transportation projects in the Regional Plan & stay connected with us so you know when to get involved later this summer.

    SANDAG is developing San Diego Forward: The 2019-2050 Regional Plan with a vision to facilitate the efficient movement of people and goods to support a sustainable and healthy region, a vibrant economy, and an outstanding quality of life for all. There are three main types of transportation projects in the Regional Plan – Transit, Active Transportation, and Roads and Highways – and the mix of projects will be based on input from individuals and organizations throughout San Diego County. Watch this video to explore the kinds of projects that could be included in the 2019 Regional Plan and visit SDForward.com/subscribe to sign up to receive email updates.

    ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ==========


    The bike lockers at Santa Fe Depot have been repaired. Thank you for your patience while they were offline. Leave your bike in a secure parking space at 60+ locations in San Diego County including transit stations and Park & Ride lots. Register today: iCommuteSD bike parking
  6.  

    The new Bike Bridge over Genesee Avenue is now open, completing the new bike path from Sorrento Valley to Voigt Drive/UCSD.

    Officials Celebrate Completion Interstate 5/Genesee Avenue Interchange
    Debbie L. Sklar June 29, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Elected officials as well as transportation agency and private industry figures Friday celebrated the completion of the long- awaited Interstate 5/Genesee Avenue Interchange Project. The $117.4-million project, which broke ground February 2015, expanded the existing six-lane overpass into a 10-lane bridge. Freeway access ramps were also widened, and an arched bicycle and pedestrian bridge was built connecting the Sorrento Valley Coaster Station to nearby schools, employers and hospitals.

    The infrastructure improvement was an important step in improving connectivity between employment hubs in northern La Jolla and University City, said Del Mar City Councilman Terry Sinnott, who is also board chair of the San Diego Association of Governments. “This project is critical to the San Diego region as it reduces congestion, provides new bike and pedestrian connections and aims to connect communities with alternative transportation choices,” he said. “The project reconfigures the interchange and adds components to promote active transportation, which will allow people to walk or bike on a continuous path from Mission Bay to Carmel Valley.”

    Project funding came from a handful of sources: $52.9 million was provided by the federal government, the City of San Diego contributed $22.9 million, $21.6 million came from Caltrans, UC San Diego contributed $1.7 million and $18.3 million was provided by TransNet, the voter-approved half- cent sales tax administered by SANDAG.
    I'd like to see images of the new bike lanes on the Genesee Avenue Bridge over the freeway and along Genesee Avenue itself. Are they protected, buffered or as safe as we would hope? I think they will get a lot of use by bike commuters (multi-modal commuter from the Sorrento Valley train station) going east from the new bike path to get to job centers on the east side of HWY-5. With this project completed and the disruptions along Genesee Avenue being all ironed out, there should be robust, safe bike infrastructure all along the eastern stretch.



    I-5 Genesee Avenue Interchange opens in time for holiday travel
    Amanda Shotsky June 29, 2018 cbs8.com

    Years-Long I-5 Overpass Construction Project in La Jolla Reaches End
    Melissa Adan and Christina Bravo Jun 29, 2018 nbcsandiego.com

    I-5/Genesee Avenue Interchange Project

    NCC Bikeway Map ~ June 2018

    Interstate 5/Genesee Avenue Interchange

    @ShiftSanDiego
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:https://timesofsandiego.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Genesee-at-I-5.jpg
    The new Bike Bridge over Genesee Avenue is now open, completing the new bike path from Sorrento Valley to Voigt Drive/UCSD.

    I'd like to see images of the new bike lanes on the Genesee Avenue Bridge over the freeway and along Genesee Avenue itself. Are they protected, buffered or as safe as we would hope? I think they will get a lot of use by bike commuters (multi-modal commuter from the Sorrento Valley train station) going east from the new bike path to get to job centers on the east side of HWY-5. With this project completed and the disruptions along Genesee Avenue being all ironed out, there should be robust, safe bike infrastructure all along the eastern stretch.


    I rode by today and it's pretty crap over the bridge: 4-6 feet unbuffered bike lane across the bridge in each direction. Standard unbuffered bike lanes on Genesee. You cycle between cars in the right turn pockets and through traffic across the bridge, so the conflict points are moved back instead of being at the intersection. I guess you could ride in the pedestrian area but I'm not sure that I would.

    The bike bridge is decent and gets you over Genesee without having to wait for the light. The run from UCSD to Sorrento Valley station is completely nice now, but this new infra doesn't make me want to ride Genesee.
  7.  
    I think for many riders it will make sense to take the path to Voight to get into UTC, instead of riding Genesee.
  8.  
    allanorn:I rode by today and it's pretty crap over the bridge: 4-6 feet unbuffered bike lane across the bridge in each direction. Standard unbuffered bike lanes on Genesee. You cycle between cars in the right turn pockets and through traffic across the bridge, so the conflict points are moved back instead of being at the intersection.
    That was my fear (see postings above: May19, 2016, Nov 1st 2016, Nov 5, 2016, May 3, 2017, Nov 3, 2017,) when I first started to hear about and investigate the new bridges along the La Jolla stretch of HWY-5. If you access the links I provided, you could see the concrete barrier was only between the pedestrians and the roadway. Bikes had no physical protection and now apparently no painted bike buffer protection. (I-5/Genesee Avenue Interchange Project)

    This was not a retrofit with associated constraints, but rather a brand new project that should have been designed with the proper considerations of modern transportation needs. Forward thinking would have provided at least a bike lane between through-traffic and right-turning traffic. A bike box and timed lights for both pedestrian and bike head-starts would have added safety margins to reduce conflicts.

    I'm afraid we'll see similar results from both the Voigt Drive Bridge rebuild as well as the new Gilman Drive Bridge that will soon be completed. Voigt Dive will be expanded from 2 to 4 lanes with added DAR access to HWY-5. How to route bike lanes around these turn lanes on the retrofitted bridge remains to be seen. Let's hope for better than what we've received on the Genesee Drive Bridge.

    All of this around the UCSD campus and surrounding community of bicyclists and bike-share patrons who all regard alternative transportation, CAP goals, health benefits and such as part and parcel of their 'quality of life'. The bar for this type of infrastructure is set way too low and must be raised quickly!

    These long lived projects are being financed with relatively cheap money (low interest rates); a once in a lifetime opportunity. Between rising interest rates, coming inflation and currency devaluation, you'll wish these projects were more forward thinking and executed with a forward vision of coming changes to transportation and population growth.

    San Dieguito River Bridge (see posting above: May 3rd, 2017) is still in design phase and these needs should be called out.

    ------------------------------
    allanorn:I guess you could ride in the pedestrian area but I'm not sure that I would.
    I believe in separated facilities for bike commuters and pedestrians. MUP's seemed like an okay fix in the early days of the transportation mode shift. They now seem to be needlessly in conflict with the goals of active transportation participation and utility. Bikes, e-bikes, e-scooters etc are now in conflict with pedestrians and I see it only getting worse. (Especially in parks and at the beaches)

    Slowing bikes for pedestrians curtails the utility of this transportation mode and likewise exposing pedestrians to fast moving bikes discourages walking. Separate facilities for bicyclist and pedestrians is the correct way to build the future. Envision that!
  9.  
    West Mission Bay Drive Bridge over the San Diego River is now under construction.

    From the City of San Diego web site, they've at least provided conceptual plans for physical separation of bikes and pedestrians from high speed traffic. It looks to be a robust reinforced concrete barrier with railing and fencing to prevent bikes or pedestrians from accidentally falling into the roadway. (Although I hope there is an egress capability from the roadway should people need to access the pedestrian path after a crash or breakdown.)


    The solution for separating pedestrians from bicyclists seems adequate enough. A different texture and color on corridor surfaces with a line demarcating each segment will work well enough I think. It still leaves the option of passing by changing lanes when clear, utilizing the full width for events like marathons, Komen Walks or bike races and utilizing the lanes for an emergency vehicle (lifeguard, rescue or police) if needed. (Much like the newer bike bridge over Rose Creek.)


    I hope they include good lighting under the bridge to illuminate the bike paths for those dark commutes in the winter months and at night. It's nice to be able to see the trolls under the bridges!


    With the expected housing boom and population/traffic densification coming to the Midway/Sports Arena area and PB/MB/LJ, this bridge will be utilized much, much more than currently. It's good to account for the foreseeable growth in utilization and account for it now in today's dollars.
    • CommentAuthorallanorn
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2018 edited
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:

    This was not a retrofit with associated constraints, but rather a brand new project that should have been designed with the proper considerations of modern transportation needs. Forward thinking would have provided at least a bike lane between through-traffic and right-turning traffic. A bike box and timed lights for both pedestrian and bike head-starts would have added safety margins to reduce conflicts.


    Here's a theory, after riding the double-bike lane up Torrey Pines Rd and visiting the Genesee works: the city may not the issue; it may very well be SANDAG and/or Caltrans. The city is at least willing to try some different stuff and implement some bike lanes during repaving projects. Is it perfect? Of course not; I'd rather have protected infrastructure everywhere. I laughed at the 18% modal bike share target the city has for 2035. But at least we're getting things, slow as they are arriving.

    SANDAG is at least trying but they either don't have the money, they induce crazy/unexplained project delays, or they keep shooting themselves in the foot by getting perfect consultations from "community feedback".

    Most of the terrible infrastructure I have to deal with outside of terrible asphalt is around freeway bridges or under crossings, which are on Caltrans right-of-way. They're still way behind in designing for active travel. Genesee was probably designed four or five years ago. We will see a very similar design for Friars/163. Caltrans has been designing the minimum viable product for Complete Streets and prioritizing motor traffic for decades, so it's not surprising what we received for Genesee and I-5. Caltrans only internally adopted NACTO a year ago, so it's going to take some time and retraining to ensure they do things right.

    Shady John:I think for many riders it will make sense to take the path to Voight to get into UTC, instead of riding Genesee.


    I really hope this is the case. I doubt that very many people ride Genesee in that area, especially west from I-5 to Torrey Pines. Why ride a relatively high-speed six-lane arterial when you can continue on a bike path to get to something less congested and with lower speed limits? Does anyone know of the designs for the Voigt and Gilman Drive overpasses?

    However - I doubt the respective agencies had that much foresight to prioritize Voigt/Gilman for active travel, probably because they haven't shown it in the past.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2018
     
    SANDAG is a CALTRANS puppet government and after decades of more-of-the-same, they both need to be dismantled. No matter how you stripe it, it is still car centric infrastructure.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2018
     
    Shrouded in the smoke screen of all the "Active Transportation" posturing, the essence of this is that Genesee has gone from six lanes to 10 (!) lanes and dual freeway turn lanes. What Genessee needed was traffic calming, not becoming a 10 lane freeway onramp. Praying that bicyclists take the path to Voigt doesn't cut it - some might not know the best route to everywhere at all times, and some might actually need to ride somewhere that requires travel on Genesee.

    PS! Quiz Time: What is the name of the longest contiguous surface street in San Diego?
  10.  
    I agree that the City of San Diego seems much more willing to implement newer solutions to accommodate the transportation mode shift required by the Climate Action Plan (CAP) and the Bicycle Mater Plan (BMP). SANDAG has done okay and CalTrans is not nearly as quick to account for the mode shift in their projects. That's not to say nothing has been done, but rather a more nimble and state-of-the-art effort is required from these agencies that serve the public long term well being.

    I agree with the notion of using paint as a first and quick employment of proposed facilities. It's cost effective, adaptable/changeable, and allows for a greater city wide implementation of developing solutions. This works well enough for roadway re-surfacing and such.

    However, in the past I have emphasized the need to get the big, expensive and long lasting projects built correctly. Once built, you're stuck with them for 60 years or more. Even if the facility hasn't been built, getting changes to the plans to accommodate mode share seems as intractable as changing an already built project. I'll concede that maybe the Genesee intersection bridge project was already 'set in stone' long before it was started, but this should be a lesson learned. More 'missed opportunities' are unacceptable and there must be an accountability by politicians, administrators and bureaucrats alike to be nimble and adaptable to accommodating mode share in projects not yet started. (Ha, fat chance of that! But it sounds good.)

    Voltaire St Bridge Rehab o/Nimitz Blvd
    Project Description: The proposed project will remove the raised median, re-stripe to reduce the number of through lanes from four to two and to provide left turning lanes, repair bridge deck cracking and spalling, replace barrier rail and signal. Total Project Cost ~ $1,446,000



    San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer (blue Hawaiian shirt) rode with the Dana Middle School Bike Train way back in 2012. Getting a feel for what the student commuters had to contend with on their journey, the old Voltaire Street bridge was a point of interest. It was due for substantial work and provided an opportunity for traffic calming as well as improved facilities for both pedestrians and bicyclist. Five years later, the bridge work is queued up, designed and financed.



    The Voltaire Street Bridge re-decking is underway. The community pleaded for robust accommodation of pedestrians and bicyclist in this neighborhood facility. Used by many to access middle schools and the high school, recreation and parks, the local library and shopping, this vital neighborhood link must be safe for all users. In a local neighborhood area where alternative transportation is so efficient and utilitarian, a project like this will certainly be well used and appreciated for it's contribution to the Quality of Life it supports.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:I agree that the City of San Diego seems much more willing to implement newer solutions to accommodate the transportation mode shift required by the Climate Action Plan (CAP) and the Bicycle Mater Plan (BMP). SANDAG has done okay and CalTrans is not nearly as quick to account for the mode shift in their projects. That's not to say nothing has been done, but rather a more nimble and progressive effort is required from these agencies that serve the public long term well being.

    And herein lies the problem:
    "Her top priority for motorists and Caltrans employees is safety."


    District 11 Director
    http://www.dot.ca.gov/d11/district-director.html
    District 11 Director
    Her top priority for motorists and Caltrans employees is safety. In 2013, District 11 launched a pilot project to enhance work zone safety through additional warning signs, reduced and enforced speed limits and an extra buffer lane between highway workers and live traffic. Caltrans partnered with other agencies for the Be Work Zone Alert and Move Over Law public awareness campaigns, urging motorists to slow down and enable highway workers to safely perform their vital duties.


    The safety of vulnerable transportation groups must be paramount.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2018 edited
     
    gottobike:"Her top priority for motorists and Caltrans employees is safety."
    District 11 Director
    http://www.dot.ca.gov/d11/district-director.html
    Note that this Caltrans director is also a SANDAG board member.
  11.  

    Mayor Kevin Faulconer with the city seal and flag in the background. Photo by Chris Jennewein

    Bond Refinancing Frees Up $464 Million for Neighborhood Improvements
    Debbie L. Sklar July 5, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Municipal bond refinancing over the past three years is expected to save the city $464 million in future interest payments, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced Thursday. Staffers expect that recent efforts, intended to take advantage of currently low interest rates, will free up an additional $24.5 million for infrastructure projects, Faulconer said.

    “We’re continually looking for new ways to improve city finances and then pour those savings right back into our neighborhoods for critical road repair and infrastructure projects,” he said. “The goal is to get the most value out of every tax dollar. By taking advantage of low interest rates, we’re paying millions less in debt and can use those dollars in future budgets for top priorities such as streets, parks and neighborhood improvements.”

    –City News Service
    Efficient and responsible management of public finances is the "more bang for the buck" that helps to move us towards the goals of improved infrastructure and a much better Quality of Life for the current citizens. The city becomes that much more attractive to potential investors, businesses, universities, tourism and families. A virtuous cycle of continuous quality improvement is self-reinforcing and accelerates the possibilities of greater adoption of the modern paradigm shifts in urban living we're excitedly anticipating.

    Reinvesting dividends realized into neighborhood improvements and infrastructure is a clever, long lasting, higher return on capital investment for the citizens and tax payers of the community. By leveraging the discounted value of current currency, low interest rates, and anticipating future inflation, the investment return is significantly multiplied.

    Keep your eye on the ball. Continue to efficiently rebuild the infrastructure, coordinating efforts like sewer and water pipes, storm water management, resurfaced roads with bike lanes, sidewalks, efficient LED street lights, smart city technologies, mass transit, etc. that will benefit all citizens for years into the future. That's responsible financial management and proper service to the public trust!

    Urban renewal should be a constant, continual effort, but especially so when the relative costs are cheap. With years of deferred maintenance, high costs of labor/benefits and retirement mismanagement, golden-calf sports stadiums/teams and other special interest goodies/giveaway's in the past, coupled with the high costs of past financing via poor credit ratings, special bonds or general-fund raiding, and civil fines for continuous regulatory noncompliance and legal settlements, it's no wonder the city was left to decay, crumble and rot. Communities are forced to form BID's, MAD's and rely on special taxes, fees, private donations and volunteers to do the work already paid for, all in a City with an extremely high tax base. Do right by the populace. A rising tide should lift all boats.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2018
     

    Why more urban cycling saves everyone money
    http://dailyhive.com/vancouver/biking-saves-money
  12.  
    How 'Bike Boxes' Will Increase Safety for Cyclists
    Alexander Nguyen and Joe Little July 5, 2018 nbcsandiego.com
    If you drive around Hillcrest lately, you have likely encountered some new street markings. The green boxes in front of intersections before the crosswalks are known as “bike box” and they are supposed to reduce accidents. The problem is that not many people know what they are just quite yet.

    The bike boxes are still new in San Diego County with boxes only in National City and Hillcrest. “There’s definitely a learning curve for the bike box,” Bike SD's executive director Judi Tentor said. Her organization advocates for more bicycling infrastructure in San Diego. The box works by allowing cyclists to safely wait inside the green box, which is painted on the right lane away from the corner where cars make right turns. Drivers are supposed to stop before the box — not in it — leaving the green area open for cyclists to safely get in front. “It’s an inexpensive way to keep bicyclists visible and help drivers see bicyclists,” Tentor said.

    The boxes have been extremely successful in Portland and they keep bicyclists safer by clearing the intersection more quickly, Tentor said. A 2011 study by Portland State University found that the number of bicycle vs. vehicle accidents decreased and yielding behavior increased. More than three-quarters of cyclists surveyed felt safer in intersections with the bike boxes, according to the study.
  13.  

    Repaving streets in San Diego. Photo by Chris Jennewein

    San Diego Ranked 2nd ‘Best Run’ Big City in America
    Chris Jennewein July 9, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego came in second among cities over 1 million in a new study that ranked the top 150 U.S. cities from best run to worst run. The study by WalletHub, a Washington, DC-based personal finance website, used 35 metrics to rank cities in terms of financial stability, education, health, safety, economy and infrastructure.

    Among cities with 1 million people or more, Phoenix ranked first and 37th overall, San Diego second and 62nd overall, and San Jose third and 84th overall. The difference between Phoenix and San Diego came down to cost. San Diego ranked much higher on quality of services — 15th overall compared to 43rd for Phoenix– but spent more per capita to achieve those services.

    WalletHub said the study was an attempt to “learn how well city officials manage and spend public funds by comparing the quality of services residents receive against the city’s total budget.”
  14.  

    All electric Siemens Charger SC-44. Photo via Facebook

    NCTD Buys Five New Trains For San Diego County
    City News Service July 9, 2018 kpbs.org
    The North County Transit District announced Monday that it will purchase five new locomotives at a cost of more than $37 million to replace aging trains "at the end of their useful life." Funding will come from Senate Bill 1, commonly known as the gas tax, as well as grants from the Air Pollution Control District. The new locomotives are estimated to require 16 percent less fuel and produce 90 percent fewer emissions than the engines they will replace, all built between 1975-1992.

    "These new locomotives will help support our mission to provide reliable public transportation to passengers throughout San Diego County," said county Supervisor Bill Horn, also a transit district board member. "In addition to increased reliability, they will also incorporate new technologies that reduce emissions and will improve air quality in the region."

    The district will purchase the diesel-electric Siemens Charger locomotives as part of a multi-state procurement with the California and Illinois departments of transportation. The joint agreement reduces overall order costs, according to the district. The first train will likely be delivered March 2021, and the last vehicle in June of that year. The engines will likely be put in service three to six months after delivery. Once the locomotives are received, the district is slated to add 36 additional Coaster trips each week to the current schedule: six on each weekday, three on Saturday and three on Sunday.
    Good news for the multi-modal bike commuters and the Climate Action Advocates!
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2018 edited
     
    With recent developments on Camp Pendleton, there is an urgent need for a separated bike path along I-5 between San Onofre State Park and Oceanside.
    Anyone know which planning agency is working on this?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2018
     
    The district will purchase the diesel-electric Siemens Charger locomotives...they will incorporate new technologies that reduce emissions and will improve air quality in the region.
    Passenger trains all over the world increasingly use electric locos - why not the Coaster?
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2018
     
    gottobike:With recent developments on Camp Pendleton, there is an urgent need for a separated bike path along I-5 between San Onofre State Park and Oceanside.
    Anyone know which planning agency is working on this?


    No more riding on the base?
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2018
     
    Sigurd:
    The district will purchase the diesel-electric Siemens Charger locomotives...they will incorporate new technologies that reduce emissions and will improve air quality in the region.
    Passenger trains all over the world increasingly use electric locos - why not the Coaster?


    Technically, they ARE electric. I would imagine the infrastructure costs of installing overhead lines for that many miles of track outweigh the costs of the new engines.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemens_Charger
  15.  
    SR-56 upgrades begin
    Karen Billing July 10, 2018 delmartimes.net
    Caltrans is currently providing updates to SR-56 which include updated striping with new paint and the installation of reflectors to replace those that are missing or worn out. The current work being done on SR-56 is to help maintain existing public safety standards for drivers when driving along that section of highway, according to Rob Knudsen, representative for Assemblymember Brian Maienschein.

    Caltrans is expected to begin the final design for the widening of SR-56, an additional lane in both directions from Carmel Valley Road to Interstate 5, by the end of the year.
    I hope the additional lanes don't have any negative effects on the bike path along this route. It would be good to see the proposal before the plan is set in stone.
  16.  


    Regional Mobility Hub Strategy

    Mobility hubs are places of connectivity where different modes of travel – walking, biking, transit, and shared mobility – converge where there is a concentration of employment, housing, shopping, and/or recreation. Mobility hubs could include: bikeshare, carshare, neighborhood electric vehicles, bike parking, dynamic parking management strategies, real-time traveler information, real-time ridesharing, microtransit services, bike and pedestrian improvements, wayfinding, and urban design enhancements.



    These features help travelers connect to regional transit services and make short trips within their neighborhoods and beyond. Integration of information technology helps travelers find, access, and pay for transit and on-demand shared mobility services. In the future, autonomous and connected transportation services may enhance mobility for travelers of all ages and abilities.

    Regional Mobility Hub Strategy Planning




    2019 Regional Plan next steps




    === === === === === === === === === === === === === === === ===

    Mid-Coast Trolley Mobility Hub Implementation Strategy

    In the Mid-Coast Corridor, mobility hubs will serve to enhance access and connections to the Mid-Coast Trolley, making it easier to use public transit and other travel alternatives. Mobility hubs offer an array of transportation services, amenities, and urban design enhancements that connect transit to where people live, work, and play. Various modes of travel, including walking, biking, ridesharing, shuttle, bus, and light rail services come together to create a seamless travel experience. Supporting technologies such as real-time arrival information, electric vehicle charging stations, and mobile applications also improve convenience for users.

    The Mid-Coast Mobility Hub Implementation Strategy will identify services and amenities for each station which may include improved pedestrian and bike connections, secure bike storage, on-demand ridesharing services, wayfinding, and supporting technologies. The strategy will also outline steps needed to implement recommended mobility hub improvements at Mid-Coast Trolley stations. The project also includes opportunities for community input to guide development of mobility hub recommendations.

    BALBOA AVENUE STATION FACT SHEET
  17.  

    Although the plan is slated for final approval from the council, the California Coastal Commission must approve 40 percent of the master plan as that area sits in the coastal zone. Photo by Shana Thompson

    Village and Barrio Master Plan gets green light
    Steve Puterski July 12, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    Mobility, meanwhile, was another source of discussion as the plan calls for enhancing cycling, walking and connectivity between the Village and Barrio. The bicycle plan, according to Scott Donnell, senior planner, said residents were concerned with safety. Developed with the San Diego Biking Coalition, the two entities incorporated cycle tracks, which separate bike paths and roads with a median. Some residents voiced concerns along some stretches and cautioned the city to research those possible dangers.

    New Master Plan approved for Carlsbad's Village, Barrio
    Phil Diehl July 11, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    A master plan to guide development for the next 20 years in Carlsbad’s two oldest neighborhoods was approved at a long and crowded City Council meeting Tuesday. After hours of public comments and discussion, the council voted 3-1 to approve the plan, with Mayor Matt Hall abstaining and Councilwoman Cori Schumacher opposed. Hall did not vote to avoid a potential conflict of interest over downtown property that he owns. Schumacher wanted some changes, including clearer language and stricter limits on building heights.

    “This is developer-driven development,” Schumacher said after no other council members supported her suggestion to create a board of experts to review the architectural designs for proposed downtown projects. The council agreed on one modification to the plan, requiring projects proposed for the Village to go to the council for final approval, instead of stopping with approval at the Planning Commission level.
    The new plan replaces the Village Master Plan adopted in 1995 and expands it to add the neighboring old residential Barrio neighborhood for the first time. It includes goals and policies intended to help make the neighborhoods safer, more attractive and prosperous. The final master plan proposes a number of grand ideas that could be pursued in the future, such as closing part of Grand Avenue to vehicles and turning it into a pedestrian promenade.
  18.  
    Carmel Valley board hears how gas tax repeal could impact local roads
    Karen Billing July 10, 2018 delmartimes.net
    Senate Bill 1 was passed by the state legislature in 2017, raising the gas tax by 12 cents per gallon and the diesel fuel tax by 20 cents and increased annual vehicle fees by $25 to $75 per year. It also added a new $100 annual fee for electric vehicles starting in 2020.
    Toni Atkins said the gas tax represents $5.2 billion in the state’s budget this year for road repair. “Roughly half of that goes back to the communities directly for local jurisdictions to decide how to spend it, so every city in the county gets money from the gas tax,” Atkins said. Since the tax was approved last year, San Diego County has received $866 million—the day before the meeting, Atkins celebrated the opening of the new Genesse Avenue bridge project, which expanded a six-lane overpass to a 10-lane bridge with added sidewalks and bicycle paths. While a lot of the project was funded by local money, some came from the state, she said.

    Atkins said the city of San Diego will get money that will likely be used for street paving and resurfacing projects but when it comes to capital projects, those will go through SANDAG.
    Planning board member Don Billings said he is still making his decision, taking into account what gubernatorial candidate Cox has stated, that California spends four times per mile to build a road than the state of Texas. “Speaking as an average citizen, when I look at the type of projects that Caltrans does, the money they spend and the public benefit, it sort of rings true to me what John Cox says,” Billings said, referencing as example the $2 billion to add a carpool lane on I-5, which will probably take a decade. “It seems to me that making the case to the public to not vote to repeal the gas tax is based on demonstrating to the public a real metric that Caltrans is a good steward of our money, that they spend it wisely, they spend it efficiently and that they rank projects not on some political pressure but on some sort of methodology that makes sense.”
    Atkins said when they conducted the hearings about the tax in Sacramento, it was not easy because they did have to address issues around Caltrans. “Caltrans is a bureaucracy…sometimes I wish they could bow to political pressure and we could get a project done but they don’t. What we do need to do is work efficiently and respond,” Atkins said.
    Atkins said that it is true that projects are more expensive to do in California due to different regulations that citizens have voted on relating to greenhouse gas emissions, the Climate Action Plan and labor issues. She remarked that the state is the fifth largest economy in the world and it is their job as the legislature to do more monitoring and oversight.

    “We are trying to restore faith in government that we’re actually going to put the money where it needs to go,” Atkins said.
    The legislature put Proposition 69 on the ballot this June, requiring that certain revenues from SB 1 will be used for transportation. It passed with 81 percent of the vote. In June, the Senate Rules Committee confirmed an independent auditor as part of the gas tax to oversee procurement and projects, an effort to enhance accountability and transparency.
  19.  



    Concrete deck finished! Last week's pour was a huge step for the Gilman Drive Bridge Project, which will increase accessibility to Medical Center Dr & the UC San Diego campus. The new bridge is scheduled for completion in early 2019.
    This might become a very well used bridge. It's narrow however, and from past construction postings I think it's only going to get 5-foot, painted, unbuffered bike lanes.

    Once the Voigt Drive bridge becomes 4 lanes from it's current 2, and they add the new on/off direct access ramps from the middle of that bridge to I-5 freeway, traffic (and bicycles) will be inclined to avoid that area and use the new Gilman Drive bridge. There really should be physical barriers to protect both bicyclist and pedestrian across this vital link on the UCSD campus.
    Voigt Bridge Replacement/ Voigt Drive Widening/ Campus Point Drive Realignment
    Additionally, Voigt Drive will be widened from two to four lanes, starting at the Voigt Drive Bridge and going to Genesee Avenue on the east. This will require relocation of the Campus Point Drive and Voigt Drive intersection to improve traffic circulation and accommodate increased queuing of vehicles. (Lead Partner: Caltrans)
    Gilman Drive/Gilman Bridge
    This new bridge will unite existing campus roads on both sides of the I-5 freeway: Gilman Drive on the west and Medical Center Drive on the east. Travelers will be able to go from one side of campus to the other without driving on busy city streets such as La Jolla Village Drive and Genesee Ave. Traffic on these roadways will be reduced and getting across campus will be quicker and more efficient.

    To facilitate smooth traffic flow, the bridge and intersections on both sides will have three-lane configurations: One lane of traffic each way with a protected left-hand turn lane. Sidewalks and bicycle lanes will also be included on the bridge.