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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    So, I've been riding the nice bike now for a while. The concern is locking it up, what with shiny hubs and all, that someone might steal a wheel. I've been using a Krypto New York chain, wich pretty much covers most situations. But, there are two problems. #1, it does not always reach around both wheels and the locking point.. Which leaves a wheel unlocked. #2, VC has U locks.. Mmm ulock... U locks, quick, easy, smaller, less than 500 pounds. But a u lock will only hit frame and one wheel, UNLESS taken off the front and secure it to the back, this is lacking in fun. Of course nothing will prevent ALL theives.. But the intent is to slow them down enough that my typical 5 - 10 minute stop off will be safe.
    Any opinions on lock up?
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009 edited
     
    i can get a U-lock that comes with a 6 foot cable. you U-lock the frame and run the cable through the wheels without having to remove the wheels. the cable locks into the U-lock. does that work for you?
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      CommentAuthormissler
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    That's what I use. I have a kryptonite evolution mini u-lock and a 6' cable. The combination works very well for me and doesn't weigh a ton. It's not a pain to open and close either because the lock mechanism is smooth and there's even a tiny LED light on the key for night use.

    Also, when I ride with friends they NEVER seem to bring locks. When that happens we lock our chainstays together with the mini u and loop the cable through both our wheels.
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    I'm not a fan of cable locks..
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    Great topic. I agree and use a mini U-lock and 6' cable. The mini u-locks are great because they give little space to fit something between the lock, frame, and lock-to object.

    Now, keep in mind that if a thief really wants your hubs, and if they have the spare 30 seconds, they'll cut out your spokes and have off with said items.

    Here's my method:

    If I'm running in a small store, and can turn around and see my bike, I use only the u-lock.
    If I'm at a cafe, eatery, or bar where I can see the bike, or check on it easily, I use the ulock and cable through the wheels (and leash for the saddle)
    If there's a valet, outside tables, or hostess around, I'll lock it up as describe above - near them and say hello (maybe more if they're cute)
    If I'm going to leave the bike somewhere, unattended for a while, I take a cheap(er) bike. Everyone needs a "lock-up" bike!
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      CommentAuthortawnya
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    I try to ride with people who have nicer bikes. :face-devil-grin:
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      CommentAuthormissler
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    bahahahaha. . perfect. the "wouldn't you really rather steal their bike instead?" approach.
    • CommentAuthorTom@VC
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    Velo Cult:i can get a U-lock that comes with a 6 foot cable. you U-lock the frame and run the cable through the wheels without having to remove the wheels. the cable locks into the U-lock. does that work for you?


    Thats what I use.
    Its an OnGaurd mini U-lock with cable.
    I U around my seat tube and rear wheel (Sheldon Brown will tell you you don't even need to get the seat tube in there, just go thru the rear tri).
    Then I run my cable thru the front wheel.
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      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009 edited
     
    U-Lock for your frame to an immovable post...Pitlocks for everything else.

    These set come with skewer locks for front and rear wheel, seatpost, top cap for threadless headsets, and even bolts for v-brakes (a touch overkill but why not?)...

    I have this set up sans the v-brake bolts on my commuter and I really love it. If anyone is interested I'll upload some pics.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2009
     
    The pitlocks are nice. William has bolted axles though
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2009
     
    I agree with Tawnya. Rust is my favorite theft-prevention device. :face-smile:
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2009
     
    the shop has a friend who's famous line is " i lock my bike up with Jesus". or in other words no lock at all. and no, he's not religious.
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      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2009
     
    Velo Cult:The pitlocks are nice. William has bolted axles though

    Oh...yeah...the pitlock set up replace your quick release skewers and won't work with the bolted axles. Well for anyone with quick release this is a good alternative to a cable or undoing your front wheel...well you could always get seatpost binder pitlock and top cap pitlock. Both great ideas...As Tom@VC mentioned above, I agree with Sheldon Brown's Lock Strategy. It leaves a lot of room for your front wheel if you are using a small U-locks like the Kryptonite Mini or NY Fahgettaboudit.
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      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2009
     
    One of these days I'm going to have to beat my cognative dissonance and just break down and do what people with experience recommend. :face-monkey:

    First things, first, dumping the chrome bag.. Sadly I just had it stiched with a SD patch on it.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    This thread brought back from the dead to tell you about this...

    http://tigrlock.com/pages/

    Most interesting lock idea I've seen in a while. Looking forward to seeing one in person.
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    that does look pretty sweet.... but i'm not certain that i like the idea of it not going through the frame... maybe i'm wrong, but it looks like all someone would have to do is quick release the wheels, bow that thing out, then proceed to take the rest of your bike. i mean, just cause they cant ride it away doesn't mean they wont take it, i know that from experience :( though i do love the part about how bolt/lock cutters cant break it! from what i know thats what they use the most... but unfortunately, it seems there is no way to really be sure unless you use multiple systems, like a u-lock, & a seat cable/chain, then pitlock type thingamajiggers or superglue or whatever for all the other bolts & crap. its really kinda sad when ya think of it, but if someone wants something off your bike they can get it with a small amount of tools... and mostly cause 9 times outta 10 no one says a damn thing to them when they are doing it, youtube confirms that like a billion times over.

    .... . .. we need lo-jack or something!
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    Anyone use the Masterlock Hand Cuff looking locks?
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      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    PacMUle:that does look pretty sweet.... but i'm not certain that i like the idea of it not going through the frame... maybe i'm wrong,


    It does go through the frame and the rear wheel if I am not mistaken. Between seat stays chain stays and seat tube.

    I am just not sure it'll hold up to a saw. Like you said, nobody gives a hoot as long as it is not their own bike. And those battery powered cutting disks go through the toughest locks in a matter of seconds.

    I never let my baby out of my sight for more than a few seconds.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    Ti is pretty tough to get through with anything. I deal with wheelchairs that use titanium tubing and brackets. Stuff is a pain.
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      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2011
     
    I find Ti really soft. I can cut through it with most things in my shop. Hack saws and cut off discs slice right through it. Especially cut off discs. Still, it's at least as safe as a cable lock although a cable lock wouldn't muck up your top tube when not in use like that bar does. A ti bar should be lighter than a thick cable lock though.....
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2011
     
    batmick:
    PacMUle:that does look pretty sweet.... but i'm not certain that i like the idea of it not going through the frame... maybe i'm wrong,


    It does go through the frame and the rear wheel if I am not mistaken. Between seat stays chain stays and seat tube.

    derp... how did i miss the stays....
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2011
     
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2011 edited
     
    The market has predictably responded to the need to color coordinate and accessorize everything little thing on your bike - now, your Kryptonite.
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      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2011 edited
     
    Beat the Thief: How NOT to lock your bike
  1.  
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      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2011 edited
     
    Using a Pedros cable cutter...
  2.  
    markphilips:Here is some good advice on how to lock you bike
    http://www.bikesfortherestofus.com/2011/08/locking-up-your-beloved-bicycle.html


    A better way to lock your rear wheel with a u-lock is to use a full length lock (not a mini) and place it so that one tine of the lock goes inside the rear wheel and outside the rear triangle, and the other tine goes outside the rear wheel and inside the rear triangle. The weight of the lock then rests on top of the rear wheel. This way a thief will have to cut through either the lock or the rear triangle to free the frame. It also has the advantage of preventing the lock from walking down the post you've secured it to if the bike is bumped or jostled.
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011 edited
     
    If you release the rear quick release, you still can't get the frame away from the rear wheel (think about it). The wheel is not coming out.

    They'll have to either cut through the rim and tire or the lock to get the frame off.

    One risk of larger U-locks is that you can end up with enough space to insert a small car jack. A car jack is strong enough to pry a U-lock open.

    Power grinders will go through any U-lock, but they are very noisy and still take a little bit of time.

    Even the best chains last maybe 1 second against big bolt cutters.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011
     
    Are there no hardened chains that can stand up to bolt cutters?

    I saw a test with some massive stuff, cut with ease.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011
     
    I was going to suggest pitlocks, and noticed someone already mentioned this. And then VC mentioned (somewhere up top) that William had bolted axles. I've been too unobservant to note that on Will's bike, so could someone please post a photo of a bolted axle. I did a quick search on google images and wasn't able to find a clear one and since I don't know what I'm looking for it is hard for me to tell why a pitlock cannot be used when one has a bolted axle (I actually just don't know what that means). And if there isn't a quick release, wouldn't wheel stealing be more difficult on a wheel with these bolted axles?

    For a while I did carry around that 16 lb chain from Kryptonite, but that became a real pain when hauling lots of groceries, so I stopped carrying that around. Now I just have pitlocked wheels and a ulock.
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011
     
    Nothing, of course, is 100%. My solution is two different locks, independent of each other. I'm not a fan of those cable-attached-to-a-u-lock combos, because that makes the u-lock a single point of failure. An independent cable would be okay, since it requires two different tools. But, a cable only needs an hand tool (as shown above), so that's like carrying one-and-a-half tools.

    I use a u-lock (NYFU mini) along with a set of hinge handcuffs. I like it because it's unexpected. Yeah, a handcuff key would open one, but who carries a handcuff key while jacking bikes? A pry method that works on the u-lock won't work against handcuffs, due to lack of purchase space. Bolt cutters won't work, due to shape. Oh, and they're really light-weight, especially compared to any dedicated bike lock. Yep, a power grinder will work, but factor both u-lock and handcuff cutting time, and, well, hey, isn't that an easier bike to steal over there?
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011 edited
     
    bikingbill:Are there no hardened chains that can stand up to bolt cutters?

    I saw a test with some massive stuff, cut with ease.
    I saw a video of a guy going through a Kryptonite NY Fahgettaboudit chain in about 1 second with some large bolt cutters. That is a big beefy heavy expensive chain.

    One of those chains that they use with cruise ship anchors would stand up to bolt cutters, because they don't make bolt cutters that wide. However carrying around a chain weighing hundreds (thousands?) of pounds could be a problem.
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2011 edited
     
    mileco:and, well, hey, isn't that an easier bike to steal over there?
    That's my thinking. I try to make it enough of a PITA to steal my bike that the next one over looks more attractive. Bike thieves seem to like easier and more convenient jobs. I also have an old and relatively cheap bike. More work plus less reward should lead to less risk of theft.
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2011
     
    TOTALLY agree. That's why I'm building up an old Nishiki Riviera right now: I want something that doesn't have high value, but is suited to me. I'm kinda defeating my purpose by getting a Brooks saddle and leather-look bar-tape, but, a guy's gotta have something.

    I'm no longer a fan of chains after seeing that video you mentioned about the NYFU chain vs bolt cutters. The weight-to-security ratio doesn't seem proportional. The u-lock weighs 4.4 lbs, and I think provides a better sense of security. The shortcoming is what to lock it to. It's great for parking meters (legal to do in SD, maybe not in other jurisdictions), but comes up short if there's only a light pole or other large diameter object. I feel conscious about locking it up to patio railings, since I think it's rude to the business. There is just such a lack of dedicated bike parking near businesses, that we're limited in options. That's a definite increase in security, just being able to park in front of a high-traffic business, and not around the corner, out of the way.

    For tonight's Happy Hour Ride hosted by Urban BS, I know that Monkey Paw has ZERO bike parking, and everyone locks to meters, trees, and occassionally the fence for the business. Given the amount of bicycles that I see there on a regular basis, it would make sense to eliminate those planters they have out front, and install the big metal ring bike racks into the sidewalk. Doesn't the city do that free on request?
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2011
     
    So, on my bike the "seat stays" are connected to the frame with allen bolts. Very hard to really securely lock the bike. I think perhaps using a small u-lock around the rear wheel and one of the chain stays and then a cable lock for the front.
  3.  
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2011
     
    markphilips:HIPLOCK
    Clever concept - but as it is not that much heavier than the Hiplock, I think I will stick to my Kryptonite Evolution Mini: U-Lock > Chain.

    Also, can't muster too much enthusiasm about their fixie-esque marketing.
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      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2011 edited
     
    BTW: They may have been on the market for a while now but I just noticed Pitlock does now make axle nuts for solid axles.

    http://www.urbanbiketech.com/category-s/26.htm

    I have a couple of sets of the QR version of the Pitlock system and I really do like it. In some instances their skewers are actually lighter than my QR skewers and I haven't had anything stolen off my bike...yet. If I can help it I don't leave my bike out for extended periods cuz with time and the right tools a thief can steal anything.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2012 edited
     
    Just learned about Abus locks.

    Like everything else, the person advocating for Abus locks was going on and on about the lock's awesomeness, including telling me stories of how he lost his key in London and the the cops, the ambulance and everyone else couldn't cut it open and that it was finally broken with the Jaws of Life. So maybe it is all that...who knows. Maybe I'll get one given my paranoia.
  4.  
    I am actually looking at getting the Abus Tresor 1385 which is the hardened steel chain with combination lock

    http://abus.de/us/main.asp?ScreenLang=us&sid=617486840154000801201276176145202&select=0104b02&artikel=4003318485664
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      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2012
     
    Sam:Just learned about Abus locks.
    ... Maybe I'll get one given my paranoia.
    I heard they cause cancer.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2012
     
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2012
     
    billd:Startup: Portland-based BikeTrak helps owners track down their stolen bike using GPS technology

    that sounds like a really good idea... i especially like that database part of it. but since it's consumer GPS wouldn't you have the problem with not having the exact location? i think we have discussed this in a thread somewhere before... i mean, if the thief lives in a house it would be pretty handy, but if it was in an apartment complex or highrise style place would it be accurate enough to be useful?
  5.  
    I just got a Kryptonite Evo-Mini 7 combo with a U-Lock and a 4' cable. The size of this U-lock is just barely big enough to go around my rear tire, seat tube, and whatever stationary object I'm locking to. By that I mean poles, bike rack bars, or something like that. Not trees or anything thick. I have a road bike and this thing is barely big enough. So I don't think it would fit for most mountain bikes with bigger tires and bigger seat tube diameters. It does feel secure on my bike and the small size reduces the risk of a thief prying it apart. The cable lock is pretty standard, but 4' is the perfect size to go around my front wheel and hook into the U-Lock. The reason I bought this combo and not the New York model is because the areas I frequent are low crime areas and the weight of the New York models would have broken my back. This combo is fairly light to throw into my backpack with no issues. It also comes with a mounting clip for mounting onto your frame, but beware, it is poorly designed. Just my two cents.
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2012
     
    http://gizmodo.com/5922074/the-best-bike-lock

    wooooooohooooo! my lock got #2 :D only because of the mounting though. 2min with an angle grinder to break it... not too shabby
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeJul 24th 2012
     
    The size of this U-lock is just barely big enough to go around my rear tire, seat tube, and whatever stationary object I'm locking to.


    I bought a narrow U-lock after doing some research:
    - the lock only needs to go around the rear wheel (no seat tube) as long as the location of the lock is located inside the rear triangle of the frame (assuming your bike has a rear triangle). The thief would have to cut all the way through the rim to get your frame.
    - much harder to be compromised (the wider the U-lock that more leverage can be used)

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html
    • CommentAuthorsd_mike
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2012
     

    [[_linker_]]
    I found this 19th Century bike lock patent... a bit clunky but made me wonder - why not lock the crank if there was an easy way to do it? Would work better for fixies at least.
  6.  
    Since my not-so-trusty cable lock went away when my bike was stolen Saturday, need some good lock recommendations for the best equipment to lock a mountain bike up in a shopping center area.
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012 edited
     
    Short version: Cables and chains are nearly worthless against a decent set of bolt cutters. They last 1-2 seconds against someone who knows that they are doing. Nothing is 100% but U-locks are the way to go if you can't park the bike in a secure area.

    Long version: There is lots of good info in this thread if you read all of it and all of the sources posted.

    Also, avoid used U-locks if they use barrel keys. Nobody makes them with barrel keys anymore -- for a reason.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2012
     
    sd_mike:http://www.blacksteel.com/hcs/index.cgi?section=Miscellaneous&subsection=Patents&serial=102

    I found this 19th Century bike lock patent... a bit clunky but made me wonder - why not lock the crank if there was an easy way to do it? Would work better for fixies at least.


    Anyone else remember these?