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    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2012 edited
     
    Please use this thread to document presumed simple fixes needed, for which the City is responsible, to make it safer for cyclists to travel San Diego streets, including "low-level" fixes such as (but not limited to):

    - Problems with signals and bicycle detection (a perennial favorite!)
    - Unsafe potholes, cracks, and alignment problems
    - Sweeping needed
    - Foilage trimming needed
    - Unsafe road markings, signals or signs.
    - Persistent illegal parking in bike lane or at curb
    - Persistently unsafe motorist behavior at particular locations

    In describing the problem, please be has detailed and accurate as possible, e.g. "Utah St. and University Ave. intersection - light detection in both lanes northbound and southbound Utah St. not working".

    Please do not use this thread for more complex fixes needed such as (as these would require a broader effort to get fixed):

    "Please fix the Pacific Hwy - Barnett junction"
    "Please install separated bikeway on University Ave."
    "Please turn Island Ave. into a bicycle avenue"
    "Please reduce all speed limits by 20%"
    (All of the above would be very nice, mind you!).

    The current SD CIty bicycle coordinator is Tom Landre (TLandre@sandiego.gov, (619) 533- 3045) and there are many other ways than this to reach him with your comments or concerns: I don't even know that he monitors this forum (although I would hope he does). And either way, I will alert him to the presence of this thread so that he is aware of it. He is a busy man - this way, he has one thread he may want to monitor, as opposed to the entire forum.

    By posting here (as opposed to - or even better, in addition to - using emails, phone calls, web forms, your favorite advocacy organization, - there's even a smartphone app -, etc.) you have permanently published your concerns for all to see, and perhaps encouraged other cyclists to be more vigilant and pro-active to get the presumed easy stuff fixed.

    But feel free to contact the City with trouble tickets any way you prefer - just don't ignore it, or think that somebody else will take care of it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2012 edited
     
    Pacific Highway just south of Taylor St. The pavement is severely damaged and badly needs a repaving/repainting like the side north of Taylor got recently. The bike lane on the south bound side is also severely under minimum legal width. There is also a chronic problem here with tree branches hanging into the space above the bike lane, low enough for bicyclists to hit. I never rode in the bike lane on the south bound side until I got well past the light for the transit station parking lot. It was too dangerous to ride in.

    India St, just north of Laurel, going under I-5, the bike lane is severely under minimum legal width. Weeds from the side often hang into the bike lane just before the I-5 bridge.

    The eastern end of Ocean Beach bike path has a chronic problem with motorists illegally parking on it by the baseball fields at the end of Hotel Circle. The cars push gravel all over the path making it dangerous even when there are no cars parked on it.

    Would the need for sharrows count as "low-level" since they are pretty cheap?

    If yes, then India Street, especially between Laurel and Washington. Also, most of north bound Morena. A new one for me that also needs them in places is Camino de la Reina. Also, Pacific Highway south of Laurel.

    I don't ride India or Pacific Highway regularly anymore but they still need the work.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2012
     
    Nice list, billd; totally agree with every single one!
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2012
     
    Yes to billd's concerns. I encounter the Pacific and OB Path problems a few times a week and have almost beefed on that gravel or run into a mommy van.
    Also, getting there via Hotel Circle North-- I wonder why the westbound bike lane is so narrow (under 3 feet in places) that it has not even been stencilled with lane markings? There is a rarely used turn lane painted in the middle, while we are forced almost into the gutter at places.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2012 edited
     
    I just thought of another one on north bound Morena. The right turn only lanes for Baker, Ticonderoga and Paul Jones make the whole trip dangerous. I control the only straight through lane here (45mph zone) and I have been safe but I have also been severely harassed for it. The right turn only lanes should just be a second regular straight through traffic lane instead with sharrows and BMUFL signs. It will have to become a right turn only lane at Balboa but that's O.K. It would still be a big improvement for everyone and it would just be paint changes and a few signs. (***speed limit comment self censored***)

    Right now, most riders ride straight through in the right turn only lane which is illegal or in the parking lane if it's open which is dangerous when you're on the right side of a right turn lane.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2012 edited
     
    Thinking about it a bit more, even the Balboa situation could be fixed by continuing my proposed new right lane on through and stopping the ramp from Balboa onto Morena with a stop sign. It would work just fine. Ramps on surface streets are unnecessary and always create problems for bicyclists and quite frankly don't help motorists all that much anyway.
  1.  
    Headed east on university ave at park. Left turn onto park to head north won't detect a bike no matter what. Spent a lot of time waiting for that signal after a late shift.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsykkelspruce
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2012 edited
     
    Also at park and el cajon there is no paint after a recent repaving. People consistently drive in the un marked bike lame. Already contacted the city and city engineers. It was painted after the first repave but after the second its been a month and not a single line there. I have personally seen cars drive in the bike lane daily and almost hit cyclists.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2012
     
    A small improvement would be to put sharrows leading away from the Vermont St. Bridge down Lincoln Ave so it connects to the Maryland St. bike lane. Of course this should be done in reverse back to the Vermont St. Bridge.

    Again this isn't pressing but as a regular user of this route it would be huge improvement for the many cyclists and cars who come through this area. The left hand turn off of Washington onto Lincoln and then the right hand turn onto Maryland is heavily used by automobiles and sharrows may help some of the awkwardness of Lincoln/Maryland intersection when cyclists are present. Cheers!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2012 edited
     
    How about a general memo to all road crews to be aware of the bike lanes?

    - Don't put construction signs in the middle of the bike lane or park your vehicles in them unless necessary.
    - Don't just broom any kind of debris out of the car lanes into the bike lanes.
    - Make sure you even out the edges of any holes you patch.
    - Don't fill the potholes and cracks in the car lanes and ignore the bike lanes right next to it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2012
     
    i can think of a million things, but at this early time my brain is only pulling up one pressing issue. the OB bike path needs to have the flora trimmed... bad! i cant remember exactly which spot, but its early on headed west, way before PCH... maybe in the second or third bridge... anyways, one spot is so bad i had to tuck down all the way to my bars to dodge overgrown bushes/trees overhead.
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2012
     
    1) 30th st from A St to broadway needs to be repaved
    2) 32nd st from market to ocean view blvs needs repaving
    3) 32nd st / harbor drive intersection needs leveling of the road with the tracks
    4) pacific highway from kurtz to taylor needs repaving

    (These are major bike arteries for those working at the navy base)
    • CommentAuthorpanoply
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2012
     
    After all the recent water service construction, I sure hope someone is going to give the pavement on Madison Ave. between Park Bl. and Maryland St. a once over. They totally destroyed that street, but on other parts of my commute (e.g. Sunset Blvd) they have done a much better job of smoothing things back out after similar work.
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2012
     
    Mission Gorge westbound from the quarry near Princess View as far as Old Cliffs Road - bike path almost always full of rocks/gravel from the trucks leaving the quarry. This gets cleaned up every couple weeks but really needs to be cleaned up more often. I think the quarry should do this as it's their mess.

    Washington St. at 163 there should be sharrows westbound or some way to indicate cyclists can use the middle lane from Cleveland or Lincoln until past the on-ramp. East/westbound there should be sharrows on the 6th Ave bridge and again eastbound at 9th Ave where traffic exiting 163 enters from the right.

    I'll post some more thoughts on this topic later
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2012
     
    JSnook:Washington St. at 163 there should be sharrows westbound or some way to indicate cyclists can use the middle lane from Cleveland or Lincoln until past the on-ramp. East/westbound there should be sharrows on the 6th Ave bridge and again eastbound at 9th Ave where traffic exiting 163 enters from the right.
    Washington and this particular section of Washington is pretty bad for bikes. There is sooo much traffic going through here. A little birdie told me there's some plans to make this much much better for bicyclists. Unfortunately, who knows when that's going to happen 8-/
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2012
     
    lots of gravel and debris on mira mar rd heading east from carroll to kearny villa... in some spots the whole bike lane is blocked with big rocks, and i say some very large pieces of metal as well, big enough to wreck a wheel if someone hit it in the dark :(
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2012
     
    PacMule just reminded me of the disappearing bike lane on Miramar Rd. I don't ride Miramar other than a Saturday morning group ride for this very reason. Actually, a couple times I have ridden Miramar when I had daily business in the area. It is horrible. One block bike lane...next block NOTHING...next block bike lane..and so on. Isn't Miramar an official "bikeway"? It's just as ridiculous as Friars Rd.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 23rd 2012
     
    JSnook:PacMule just reminded me of the disappearing bike lane on Miramar Rd. I don't ride Miramar other than a Saturday morning group ride for this very reason. Actually, a couple times I have ridden Miramar when I had daily business in the area. It is horrible. One block bike lane...next block NOTHING...next block bike lane..and so on. Isn't Miramar an official "bikeway"? It's just as ridiculous as Friars Rd.

    a lot of the bike lanes out here suck and are in complete disrepair! eastgate mall used to have a bike lane... but the paint has simply rubbed off & no one ever bothered to put it back... going from la jolla to mira mar it just slowly fades & disappears after the bridge. and a ton of people use this to skip the on/off ramps for the 805 on la jolla village dr/mira mar rd. heading east on mira mar rd though is the bane of my existence & i have basically given up hope. the pavement is rutted as all hell & there is a buckle (pavement raised up to make a lil speed bump) about every 10-20 feet pretty much the whole way from carroll all the way to KVR. there are also two jolly lil spots where the bike lane does that disappearing act, that just happen to be the two spots that are to narrow to share the lane. best part is, one of them actually has a share the road sign, but not until the road widens up enough for you to move back over. i will not lie, taking the lane there is scary with the speed difference! i have seen my life flash before my eyes more than once, so to say. for an official bike corridor, its pathetic!

    but i digress... this thread is intended for smaller problems. and the reality is, that whole damn road needs to be redone.
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeAug 23rd 2012
     
    Possibly unsafe signal: I feel the left turn green from Washington onto Park is too short for a cyclist to get through the intersection without the light turning red on them.

    Unresponsive signal: Left turn from Golfcrest to Mission Gorge - light does not recognize cyclists or it's too hard to find the right spot to trigger it. Dangerous because cars travel 55mph on Mission Gorge so you either have to wait for a car to trigger the light or figure out a safe time to run the red (assuming most won't dismount and press the peds 'walk' button)
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeAug 23rd 2012
     
    Mr. SD Bicycle Coordinator - Would you please put sharrows on University Ave from Ibis to 5th Avenue. You already have sharrows from Third to Fifth (which is perplexing why only two blocks received sharrows) so please extend them all the why to the bike lane that goes up and down Washington. Pretty please?
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2012
     
    PacMUle:i can think of a million things, but at this early time my brain is only pulling up one pressing issue. the OB bike path needs to have the flora trimmed... bad! i cant remember exactly which spot, but its early on headed west, way before PCH... maybe in the second or third bridge... anyways, one spot is so bad i had to tuck down all the way to my bars to dodge overgrown bushes/trees overhead.


    Pac-- it's westbound just before the Pacific Highway ramps. Pretty dangerous as you have to hit the eastbound lanes to go around. We might have to head down there with clippers.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2012
     
    Cecil:
    PacMUle:i can think of a million things, but at this early time my brain is only pulling up one pressing issue. the OB bike path needs to have the flora trimmed... bad! i cant remember exactly which spot, but its early on headed west, way before PCH... maybe in the second or third bridge... anyways, one spot is so bad i had to tuck down all the way to my bars to dodge overgrown bushes/trees overhead.


    Pac-- it's westbound just before the Pacific Highway ramps. Pretty dangerous as you have to hit the eastbound lanes to go around. We might have to head down there with clippers.
    thanks for clearing up where that is! i would do it but i dont have any gardening stuff. but i will more than likely ride down it sunday if anyone wants to bring some & have a bush trimming party?
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2012
     
    I'm out of town this weekend, but if the problem persists, I have the tools.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2012
     
    Cecil:
    PacMUle:i can think of a million things, but at this early time my brain is only pulling up one pressing issue. the OB bike path needs to have the flora trimmed... bad! i cant remember exactly which spot, but its early on headed west, way before PCH... maybe in the second or third bridge... anyways, one spot is so bad i had to tuck down all the way to my bars to dodge overgrown bushes/trees overhead.


    Pac-- it's westbound just before the Pacific Highway ramps. Pretty dangerous as you have to hit the eastbound lanes to go around. We might have to head down there with clippers.


    We may be thinking of the same spot - but I was thinking it was somewhere just after the Morena underpass westbound - where one has to go into the opposing lane at a blind turn: Very dangerous, indeed, esp. as many cyclists travel quite fast here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2012 edited
     
    Utah St. (marked as bike route), northbound and southbound, in North Park: Roadway sensors do not activate green light at two intersections: University Ave. and Lincoln St.

    Please adjust/repair and mark sensors - or just plain turn off the sensors and put the intersections on auto.
  2.  
    Park Blvd. Got the bike lane repainted finally.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2012
     
    PacMUle:
    Cecil:
    PacMUle:i can think of a million things, but at this early time my brain is only pulling up one pressing issue. the OB bike path needs to have the flora trimmed... bad! i cant remember exactly which spot, but its early on headed west, way before PCH... maybe in the second or third bridge... anyways, one spot is so bad i had to tuck down all the way to my bars to dodge overgrown bushes/trees overhead.


    Pac-- it's westbound just before the Pacific Highway ramps. Pretty dangerous as you have to hit the eastbound lanes to go around. We might have to head down there with clippers.
    thanks for clearing up where that is! i would do it but i dont have any gardening stuff. but i will more than likely ride down it sunday if anyone wants to bring some & have a bush trimming party?


    Done deal. Just west of PCH.
    City Bike Coordinator- Please focus on the things we can't do ourselves. I/we know what it's like to give something to someone who doesn't take care of things. Give us the infrastructure and I, for one, will help take care of it!

    BTW... I broke my broom handle today. I'll try to make it out tomorrow to sweep away the debris I couldn't carry off the path.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2012
     
    Hans, you are friggin awesome!!! thank you!
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2012
     
    What do you all think about mapping these requests on to a google map?

    I created a map that anyone can collaborate on. I thought it would be nice to visually see the problems and then make updates as they get fixed, like Hans' latest handiwork. I added a test placemarker so you can see what a photo on the map looks like. Tutorial on how to add photos to google map is here:
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeAug 29th 2012
     
    Thanks Hans,

    I am riding there tomorrow for the first time since I saw it. I'll stop and clean up a bit too.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHans
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2012
     
    Cecil:Thanks Hans,

    I am riding there tomorrow for the first time since I saw it. I'll stop and clean up a bit too.

    Excellent! I really hated leaving the debris in the path where someone could get a flat. I'll be taking a bow-saw and hacking off the thick trunk that was too big for my pruning loppers.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2012
     
    Infinitely better Hans. You didn't leave much. I swept with a bush broom for about 5 minutes. Thanks again.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsvelocity
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2012
     
    Way to go Hans!
    • CommentAuthorjstech
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2012
     
    Signals not detecting bicycles:
    - Eastgate Mall and Genesee, going both directions on Eastgate (I've called this one in)
    - Voigt Dr and Campus Point Dr, going both directions on Voigt

    Foilage:
    - Southern end of Gilman Dr. (near the interchange with the 5), northbound side
    - Rose Creek Trail between Garnet and Mission Bay Dr

    This thread is a great idea, but I wonder if a ticket-tracking system would be more appropriate? (Like what open-source software orgs use to track bugs and feature requests.) I'd be happy to set one up, but it'd only be worthwhile if it's actually going to be used.
  3.  
    I'm happy to volunteer time and muscle to gorilla fix-it campaigns. Just need the tools. Pershing & Nimitz next?
    •  
      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012
     
    ^^ same here :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2012 edited
     
    I would like to suggest changing the downtown recommended cycle route from A St. to C St. and making it into a bike boulevard that stretches from Columbia St. to Park Blvd.

    A St. going eastbound has a significant disadvantage of being uphill on a one-way road. It's a needless hill, too, since the crest doesn't connect to anything. You still have to go downhill then back uphill to connect to Park Blvd. Once you get to 10th Ave., you then have to deal with cars exiting and entering the 163, all jockeying for lanes and trying to make sense of the unclear signage for which lane goes to what connecting road. As is usual for three-lane one-way roads in San Diego, cars travel much faster than the speed limit, and race to get through all the timed lights, making it uncomfortable to be a cyclist riding your way up the incline.

    C St. is discontinuous from Columbia St. to Park Blvd. which makes it undesirable as an automotive corridor. This seems like an ideal place to a) make a continuous path by adding cycletracks in the blocks that don't have lanes for vehicle traffic (specifically near Civic Center); and b) make a bike boulevard that allows bikes to pass through the entire length while preventing cars from going more than a block or two (that's what A St., B St., and Broadway should be for).

    It's obvious that a desired cycle path is along this street, partly through observation, but mostly because there are signs prohibiting sidewalk riding in several locations that have no travel lanes. Clearly, bikes WANT to use this street, but legally can't. Another significant advantage is that it's flat along the same parallel as A St. No climb equals smoother riding.

    I tell you, I'm getting REALLY tired of getting honked at, swerved at, and yelled at, while legally riding on A St. which has sharrows and bike route signs along its length. The drivers clearly aren't interested in "getting educated" about bicycle rights and respect on this corridor. Let's give up on A St. and figure out how to make C St. better.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2012 edited
     
    Odd. I never got harassed on A St., though admittedly I only rode up it maybe 100 times or so (that's not a lot compared to my experience on India or Morena). In fact, once I was in downtown proper on the 25mph streets, harassment seemed really really rare. I mostly seem to get harassed on 35mph and up roads. There were a couple of times on India in Little Italy near Grape/Hawthorn but that's about it, which is not much considering the approximately 1200 times I went through there going home from work.

    I don't know how you can possibly make C Street better. It's sidewalk until you get past 6th. There are the trolley stops. It's not going to be easy. When going up A, I would usually cut over to C at 6th to avoid any more needless climbing.

    Motorists are not interested in "getting educated" as you say, but we can't give them a choice in the matter. They're going to have to learn to accept our presence on the road whether they like it or not. They will get over it eventually. Sharrows will help. Getting sharing the road with bicyclists into the driver's education required curriculum and driver's tests will help even more.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2012 edited
     
    billd:I don't know how you can possibly make C Street better. It's sidewalk until you get past 6th. There are the trolley stops. It's not going to be easy.
    So you've told us in detail why you think C would be unsuitable as a "bike boulevard". Fine: In the interests of staying constructive - which is the whole idea of this thread - now tell us where exactly in this area you think the bike boulevard should be located.

    If you don't want them at all, just come clean and tell us you don't - in which case you can spare yourself the effort of arguing against proposals based on minute details on why "it won't be easy" in any particular location, and instead just say "no". We'll get it.
  4.  
    My issue with "Bikes May Use Full Lane" sign is motorists now think if a road doesn't have that sign then the bike isn't allowed to be in the lane. I've lost track of how many times I've heard that yelled from cars. Not sure what the remedy is for that aside from a PSA/PR campaign.

    Would love to see the green paint and yield to bikes on 1st & 5th coming up from downtown into Hillcrest and the Balboa Park area like they now have on Montezuma Rd. As it is now cyclists have to take the 2nd lane from the right fighting against traffic flying onto the freeway. Hell forbid you be in the way between a car and the freeway. Same on 5th going uptown.
    •  
      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2012
     
    It's sidewalk until you get past 6th. There are the trolley stops.

    Make a multi-use path out of the sidewalk. No reason it can't become that by modifying the curbs. Every "bike path" in the city is really a multi-use path, so there's plenty of precedent.

    I, too, drop down to C St. at 6th, but there's two issues with that: 1) the bike route signage points you up A St., not down to C St. The suggested route needs to be changed; 2) C St. past 6th can be improved by making it a bike boulevard that prevents cars from going more than a block or two. This would eliminate cars bottling up behind a cyclist on a one-lane road. They get frustrated because they legally can't cross the double yellow and drive on the trolley tracks, and the roadway isn't wide enough to share.

    I never got harassed on A St.

    It's great that you don't get harrassed. Really. I'm happy that you're doing swell when you ride there. But just because it doesn't happen to you, doesn't mean that it doesn't happen. You admit that you don't ride that street much. So why would you oppose improvements suggested by someone who does ride it on a regular basis?

    I've never been mugged. I've never had a bottle thrown at me while biking, either. I've never had someone get out of their vehicle to challenge me. Of course, some people get into so many situations and are afraid enough that they carry pepper spray, right? So should I tell those people that they have no reason to carry self-defense because it's never happened to me?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2012
     
    Sigurd:If you don't want them at all, just come clean and tell us you don't - in which case you can spare yourself the effort of arguing against proposals based on minute details on why "it won't be easy" in any particular location, and instead just say "no". We'll get it.
    WOW! You're making some big assumptions there.

    It won't be easy because of what's there already which will have to be displaced. The trolley stops are not likely to be easy to displace but if you leave them there, then there will be constant conflicts with bicyclists. I don't think that that's minute. You could try to make the trolley users settle for America Plaza and City College and nothing in between. Good luck with that. Those stops in between are very popular stops; one being very close to Horton Plaza and Civic Center Plaza.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2012 edited
     
    Island is too far south to work as a substitute for A or C, but it will be a great bike boulevard someday (if we can just get those pesky stop signs turned the right way...)

    Most of C has one traffic lane, either eastbound or westbound. The easiest bike boulevard solution is to convert that lane to a bike path, and make it two directions for bikes. I'm not sure what to do about the bottleneck around 2nd, but there might be a solution.

    Same solution would work well for Park, which is one lane southbound but could be a two-way bike facility to connect City College to the new library - just sayin
    • CommentAuthorsrvienna
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2012
     
    Kathy, I don't know if trying to get a "Bicycle Boulevard" is the language that should be used. According to the new NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guidelines :"Bicycle boulevards should be designed for motor vehicle volumes under 1,500 vehicles per day (vpd), with up to 3,000 vpd allowed in limited sections of a bicycle boulevard corridor."

    I don't know what the volume on those roadways is currently and the only historical counts that I could find, were before development in the East Village and either too far to the west (between Front and First) or east (between 19th and 20th) and both counts were above 1,500 vpd.

    I like what LADOT has done with their "Bicycle Friendly Streets" which takes the same traffic calming techniques used for "Bicycle Boulevards" and places them on streets with higher volumes than the 1,500 vpd streets.

    I know this is just semantics, but when it comes down to it, we need to be really clear with what it is we are asking for from the city.
    •  
      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2012 edited
     
    Kathy,

    I like your suggestion better than mine, since I was just thinking one-way traffic. The only obstacle I see is delivery access for businesses along that corridor. They may be less receptive if that is their only access. I'm unclear if they have access from the numbered avenues.

    Riding the various trains along the California coast, bike paths are a frequent complimentary feature to rails. I like the idea of following the trolley along C and down Park. Auto traffic isn't missing anything by losing those one-lane one-way streets, since the entire downtown is parallel paths.

    As for upgrades to Island, I like what they've done in Monterey to streets like this in residential neighborhoods. They've managed to drop a roundabout with aesthetic appeal into an existing intersection. Imagine the appeal of little islands on Island! Then we could tell out-of-towners that's how the street got its name. Stop signs are fascist. Yield signs are liberal.

    srvienna,

    I get what you're saying about semantics, because that's what is understood by planners, engineers, and contractors. I think Kathy was not suggesting a "boulevard" so much as a class 1 bike path.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2012
     
    @BillD - you know more about routes and roadway conditions than probably any cyclist I know.

    billd:WOW! You're making some big assumptions there.
    On the contrary. Based on the above, I was hoping to get your thoughts on which downtown streets in the area of C St. might be more suitable for a bike boulevard "style" treatment.

    I, for one, think Island Ave would make a great bike boulevard: Granted, not the perfect location, but possibly "easier" to deploy than some of the other east-west alternatives: It would be a great start.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2012 edited
     
    Island would be much easier to convert. There is far less pedestrian traffic and not anything I can think of that's particularly difficult to displace; especially compared to the trolley stops. There's also less traffic on the cross streets relative to C, which has enormous traffic on the cross streets.

    The main down side, as Kathy pointed out, is that it's a bit far south.

    Maybe E?
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2012
     
    I realized after everyone commented that I wasn't very clear in my suggestions. I agree with srvienna that it's important to be semantically correct, and I wasn't. Here's what I meant to say... (although it's Friday night and I'm blaming any typos on the happy hour margharita consumed earlier...)

    I'd suggest that Island be converted to a true bike boulevard between 16th and 1st. I think the auto traffic counts are probably very low along there and could meet the criteria. One of the main benefits to a bike boulevard is the removal of stop signs, though, and that would attract auto traffic unless measures were taken, like turn restrictions. I love the idea of "islands on Island" to provide landscaping opportunities, traffic calming, and all-around coolness.

    For C and Park, I propose removing auto traffic completely and converting the existing one way traffic lanes to two way Class I bike paths. Park would be easier at the moment, since I don't think there are very many parking garage entrances or other required auto access points. C would be more difficult, but not impossible.

    I like Bill's suggestion of E Street as well. It's broken up by Horton Plaza, unfortunately. But that doesn't mean the segments east and west of the mall couldn't be turned into bike-friendly streets. I used E a lot when I worked downtown and I NEVER saw it with enough traffic to justify more than two auto lanes. There's some space to work with there. I'm pretty sure the downtown community plan designates both Island and E as "green streets" that are supposed to get enhancements to bike and ped travel, but not sure if there are any specific improvement projects funded at the moment.
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      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2012
     
    My opinion on C over E Street is simply based upon Broadway and the transit connections. If C were bikeable from Sante Fe Depot (or American Plaza) to Park, it keeps you from having to drop down to E and crossing Broadway if you used transit to get downtown. This is partly selfish, since I use Amtrak/Coaster/Trolley enough to make this a desirable route for me.

    East-west routes in downtown just have so many issues. The MLK Promenade has installed iron gates to make it non-contiguous, and placed "No Biking" signs in random areas. Island has the stop signs every block. C and E are blocked by the Civic Center and Horton Plaza, respectively. A Street is an auto corridor and uphill. Even going all the way down to the marina causes problems, since Seaport Village bans bikes and the one bike lane behind the Convention Center is a cruel joke. I'd really like to see what Kathy suggests, one route north and one route south of Broadway. The grid absorbs so much auto traffic that those two streets are immaterial to cars. Traffic downtown really isn't that bad for inside a major city, but it simply doesn't make allowances for biking.

    Really, I'd like to see some experiments from the city in the downtown area beyond painting shared lane markings. Vancouver, Portland, and Los Angeles all have broken the ice for bike-friendly street projects, and I'd be behind anyone who is willing to commit to bolder planning.
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2012
     
    Geoff:..I'd be behind anyone who is willing to commit to bolder planning.
    Amen to that.