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    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2013
     
    Please help compile this list. Going to use this list to ask for commitments from public officials and politicians, etc.

    I'll start:
    Friars by the 163
    Clairemont Mesa Boulevard by I-805
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2013
     
    Are you looking for ones that have a history of crashes, or all the ones that are badly designed? City of San Diego or whole county?

    Crash history that I know of. I'm certain there are more that I don't know about:
    Kearny Villa Road @ 163 (high speed uncontrolled on-ramp)
    Pershing @ I-5 (uncontrolled onramp)
    Mission Bay Drive @ 5 (uncontrolled offramp)
    NB I-5 entrance to Camp Pendleton (uncontrolled offramp)

    Badly designed (I basically just looked for ramps that have uncontrolled merge/diverges onto city streets):
    Most ridiculous -
    Balboa @ I-15
    La Jolla Village Dr @ 805
    SR56 to I-5 north connector (which currently uses Carmel Valley Road)

    Honorable mentions:
    Del Mar Heights road onto SB I-5
    Via de la Valle @ I-5
    WB Manchester to SB I-5
    Palomar Airport @ I-5
    Mission Ave @ I-5 Oceanside
    SR 76 @ I-5
    78 @ College
    78 @ Mar Vista
    78 @ Twin Oaks Valley Road
    SB I-15 offramp onto N Center City Parkway in Escondido
    I-15 @ Rancho Bernardo Road
    I-15 @ Poway Road
    I-15 @ Mira Mesa Blvd
    I-15 @ Pomerado Road/Miramar Road
    I-15 @ Balboa
    I-15 @ Aero
    I-15 @ Friars
    I-5 @ Genesee
    I-5 @ La Jolla Village Dr
    I-5 @ Balboa
    I-5 @ Clairemont
    I-5 @ 27th
    I-5 @ 32nd
    I-5 @ 8th (National City)
    I-5 @ Main (Chula Vista)
    I-5 @ Palm
    I-5 @ Coronado Ave
    I-805 @ H
    I-805@ Home
    I-805 @ Mira Mesa Blvd
    52 @ Regents
    52 @ Genesee
    I-8 @ 70th
    I-8 @ College
    I-8 @ Fairmont/Mission Gorge
    I-8 @ Qualcomm/Texas
    I-8 @ Morena
    I-8 @ W. Mission Bay Dr
    I-8 @ Nimitz

    I'm sure there are others, but those are the most obvious in a Google Earth flyover...
  1.  
    I don't know if they've been been "deadly" yet but the spots where I've had the most close calls / near misses are:

    1) Southbound Pershing onto the 5
    2) Southbound Park Blvd onto the 5/163
    3) Pacific Highway from Barnett to Harbor Drive. (Not necessarily an interchange tho)

    Honorable Mention: University Ave @ 805

    These are just my experiences.
  2.  


    This is Clairemont Drive looking east as it just starts to go over Interstate 5. Notice how the big sweeping turn off of the Highway just throws the traffic into the east bound lane. The road painting is such that the traffic just cuts right across the area a bicycle might be in. This would be a good place to "Take The Lane", but even then it really doesn't offer any confidence you'll be protected from high speed traffic. The exiting vehicles have a yield sign but .... will they / do they yield to bicyclists?



    This is just a little further along Clairemont Drive east where the North bound Highway 5 exits. You can't see the traffic light to the left of my bicycle in this image. There is a green right arrow at the same time there is a green light for the east bound traffic. I'm guessing they figure the right turn is into a dedicated lane, but I observed autos just moving into the east bound lane. Just a bit further up, the lanes merge! If you're riding through here you really get squeezed into a no win situation. Take the lane and the merging traffic just merges right into you. Sheesh. I was shocked as I sat there observing the traffic flow, the strange signal light sequences, pedestrians and bicyclist as I took these images.

    I have ambitions of imaging as many intersections like this in SD District 2 as I can. There are so many like this! It may take a while. And this is just the east bound side. The west bound side is just as sketchy I'm sure.

    Stephan:
    It is worthwhile to contact your council representative and the mayor about this issue, but it is also important to understand that the city doesn't own the interchanges and can't, on it's own. do anything about them. The freeway interchanges are Caltrans' responsibility.

    Sigurd:
    We need to be very specific as to which interchange(s) we want Caltrans/City to review as the first step - even if starting with only one or two for now.

    Stephan:
    Well if you want to see changes in one year or less, you should focus on an interchange or two where Caltrans could make a difference with paint and signs, if any exist.
    In any case, the first step is raising the issue in the public's and elected officials' consciousness. Then get them to do something about it.


    City of San Diego: Dangerous Intersections for Redesign Considerations

    Sea World Drive / HWY8 /Sunset Cliffs /Nimitz south menagerie (Google "4560 Nimitz Blvd, San Diego, CA" and zoom in.) This also is very close to the West Point Loma Blvd and Famosa Blvd intersections with Nimitz Blvd. (See images below)

    Ingraham Street North as it passes Sea World. (Google "2460 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA" and then zoom in.) Both the Ingraham Street/Sea World Drive intersections (high speed ramps/city street clover leaf) as well as the Ingraham Street/West Mission Bay Drive intersections (high speed ramps/city street clover leaf) are hazardous to your health if on a bicycle. No one really rides this section of Ingraham but for a few tourist who don't know any better and a few commuters who, ....well, .... I really don't know.

    North Harbor Drive to North bound Nimitz Blvd. (Google 4600 North Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA and zoom in.) Big sweeping right turn and if you're on a bike continuing on northward bound N. Harbor Drive, it can get sketchy through here.

    The San Diego Airport (Lindbergh Field) (Google 3300 North Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA) Ask Stephan and anyone who rides along North Harbor Drive what he thinks of all the high speed ramps getting in and out of this facility.

    Balboa Avenue and Morena Blvd. (Google 3150 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA and zoom in.) There are Highway ramps close by also.

    Mission Bay Drive from Damon Ave to North Mission Bay Drive can get sketchy in both directions if you choose to skip the bike path for a more direct route to the bay front.

    Going north on La Jolla Blvd where Turquoise Street merges into it, in a high speed ramp/turn.

    La Jolla Village Drive around Gilman Drive. (Google 3000 La Jolla Village Drive and zoom in). There are also Torry Pines Road and La Jolla Scenic Rd to worry about, ...right hooks from speedsters.

    VeloCafe mentioned Pacific Highway from Barnett to Harbor Drive. How often have we heard this one mentioned?



    ~ continue below:
  3.  
    Continued from above:

    These are just some of the local roads in my neighborhood that really have nothing to do with Highway overpasses / on-off ramps. If the city has no control over the Caltrans facilities, they certainly have jurisdiction and responsibility over city roads. With a little creative energy, maybe even paint and signage will help to make some difference. It would be a start until more robust planning, design and engineering can be completed and MONEY sourced.

    ==== ==== ==== ==== === ====

    I would like to nominate Nimitz Boulevard as a good starting point if we have to pick one, just to get the ball rolling. We've already seen good progress on the south end with the new paving and painting. A more thorough job along the entire length and a major overhaul at the north end including Famosa ~ W Point Loma ~ Sunset Cliffs ~ Hwy-8 areas would make this a good demonstration project. Of course the Chatsworth intersection would be included in a revamp. It would be good to see this critical boulevard completed from end to end, so the citizens can see what a well thought out, well engineered "Complete Street" might look like. It could be a showpiece for visitors and other transportation designers. It's not a long road but a very critical one and very visible to many who live in and visit the city.



    North bound Nimitz Blvd. at West Point Loma Blvd. This is a big sweeping high speed turn onto Nimitz. The layout of the bike lanes here is very poorly done. You have to cross this ramp to get to the bike lane along the edge of the road.



    Once you're in the bike lane you get things like storm water runoff debris. What a mess and a real danger as you try to navigate high speed merging traffic and/or are riding through here at night.



    Just a little ways along you get the Famosa off ramp. Another long gradual exit for speeding traffic who often cross into the bike lanes as they exit right. There is a long no man's land to get across this section continuing on your way south on Nimitz Blvd. Notice the bike lane stripe just guides you off to the right and up to Famosa. I'm sure the vehicular traffic sees this line as a "fog line" demarcating their traffic lane, and not as a bike lane stripe. It's narrow, fast and scary through here. The traffic has a "take no prisoners attitude" as well.



    Just an example of the traffic exiting to Famosa from southbound Nimitz Blvd. These folks are well behaved if not driving too fast. (Those are "right turn signals" you see, not brake lights!) At least they haven't crossed the line into the bike lane and taken out "'ol Trigger". Yikes, where would I be then?

    ===== +++++++ ===== +++++++ ===== +++++++ ===== +++++++

    I wish to express my condolences to the family of the bicyclist who lost his life.
    Also, thank-you to all the advocates who take this to heart and rally to make San Diego a safer place to ride a bicycle or walk across a street.

    Ride well and be safe out there.

    OKB
    • CommentAuthorJayKay
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    kathy's list is depressing. Very Accurate but still depressing.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013 edited
     
    Interchanges that I know have resulted in death based upon stories in the news:

    I-805 and Balboa
    I-805 and Clairemont
    I-15 and Friars

    Basically, any high speed transition between a surface road and any other road is bad. Surface roads should not have high speed transitions to/from other roads.
    • CommentAuthorJSnook
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    I'll add a couple:

    Fairmount at Montezuma (both directions). Freeway style on/off ramps.

    I know it's listed above but I'd clarify that I-8/Fairmount/Mission Gorge is really only bad southbound as northbound there is already a bridge/path (that is in so-so shape) so I would be careful to specify the direction on that one.

    Washington at 163 - again both directions.

    From Kathy's list above it's pretty obvious many if not most freeway interchanges are dangerous. I think lowering exit ramp speeds, striping the roads to make bike lanes obvious - maybe similar to the green paint on Montezuma - instead of just ending the bike lane promptly when 55mph trucks are merging in on the right? It just seems like a lot could be done with some rumble strips, signs indicating bike x-ing/merging and such could be implemented somewhat easily. The green paint and signs on Montezuma have made a big difference so far in my experience.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    Cross posting for volume:

    Turbo Bob has tracked down Caltrans District Director Laurie Berman's direct: 619-688-6668
    Please take three minutes to call her and request that she appear at tomorrow morning's city council meeting to address the safety of freeway interchanges.

    Thanks
    • CommentAuthorPetteri
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    It may not be a bad idea to focus on areas where there are no realistic ways to avoid the bad intersection. Washington and 163 for example might be bad, but you can easily avoid that by taking University or Robinson. Plus at least exit from SB 163 does have a traffic light and is not a high-speed merge.

    I know I-8 at Morena was listed already but I find it especially annoying since it's the main route from Presidio / Old Town to the OB bike path. Having to cross highway onramps to get to a bike path kind of defeats the purpose! Yes you can avoid it by detouring on Pacific Highway but it's not exactly the nicest bike route either, especially coming back south where the Taylor St lights don't seem to pick up bikes...
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    Kathy:Are you looking for ones that have a history of crashes, or all the ones that are badly designed? City of San Diego or whole county?


    All, thanks all for the help. Looking for City only. SDCBC being a county coalition can work on county-wide issues. So maybe a sep. thread for the county advocates.

    If fixing these intersections/merges isn't a job (and safety) bonanza, I don't know what is.
    • CommentAuthorysa
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    Texas Street going over the 8 in either direction

    Morena and Balboa in all directions

    76 bike path crossing East over the 15
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013 edited
     
    Kathy's list is sobering. So is the realization that responsibility for these interchanges lies primarily with Caltrans, not with the City of SD.

    While improving these interchanges should be a high priority for bicycling advocacy, I suggest it will take decades to make any significant progress. We are simply too small of a minority to marshal resources on this scale.

    So while we are working on that, we should also try to do things that will make a significant difference. Like improve cyclist skills and behavior. It is possible to navigate these interchanges safely, even if not everyone is 100% attentive all the time, and it's not difficult to learn.
  4.  


    The above image of a bicyclist as he rides north along Nimitz Boulevard having just crossed West Point Loma Blvd. There is a fair amount of traffic but so far everything is cool and easy as he rides in his Bike Lane. As you look at the traffic lanes, notice how wide the lane next to the Bike Lane is. It's got to be 18 - 20 feet wide along this short stretch. Why? When a bicyclist turns his head to check for upcoming traffic, he can't tell how a vehicle is going to proceed. A car or truck could be driving close to the dotted lane dividers and still make the bend onto the Highway. They could also ride close to the Bike Lane and proceed toward the Sunset Cliffs bridge. They could drive in the center of the lane and you can't tell what they're going to do. (Most turning onto the Highway didn't use their turn signals. Well guess what. It's not a turn, it's a bend. They're not called bend signals silly!)



    As the bicyclist begins to make the bend leading to the onramp of Highway 5, you'll soon see that he will be hidden from the following traffic until they too have made the bend and are right up on him. If you are a regular cyclist through here, you can anticipate what is coming. If you're a visitor to the city, or a new resident like many military personnel or college students, or maybe using the new bike share bikes, this may be the first time riding this road. You can't tell what's coming and don't know how to anticipate and/or plan accordingly.



    He hasn't yet made his move to take the lane so as to continue north toward the Sunset Cliffs bridge. He has stayed inside his Bike Lane as he thinks he should. Along the side of the road is about three or four BIKE LANE signs and so a rider would be forgiven if he stayed in the Bike Lane thinking it will take him to where he wants to go. I guess it magically turns into a "fog line" and follows the bend right around onto the Highway. In any case, he'll soon have to leave this Bike Lane, cross over the right merge lane, and secure his rightful place in the traffic lane continuing north to the bridge. Good luck with that!



    During this stretch, I watched as he signaled, turned his head to check traffic, turned back to watch the road ahead, and repeated these actions a couple of times more until finally he was afforded a chance to cross over. Notice the red SUV and then the white SUV behind it, both speed up to get around (right hook?) the bicyclist and only a vehicle further back slowed to allow him to cross. With the red and white vehicles so far left in the very wide lane, he could be forgiven for thinking they are proceeding to the Sunset Cliffs bridge, and maybe begin to make his move across the lane. This ain' t his first rodeo and knows enough to let these speedsters go past and across him before making his move into the traffic flow.



    He's through but just barely. It gives me the willies to watch this and it's worse when riding it myself. This is where the UCSD graduate student from China was killed last year. Imagine having to tell the parents of an exceptional student he was killed trying to cross an intersection with no real technical guidance i.e. crossing signals, cross walks, signage, proper road markings etc. What a heartbreaking task.


    Ride well and be safe out there.

    OKB
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    You have to merge left earlier there.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2013
     
    Serge2:You have to merge left earlier there.
    True, but most bicyclists don't know that or know how to do that properly.

    I have done it a number of times since I have some friends who live just a bit off Nimitz. It's not for the beginning vehicular cyclist. It's definitely not for the non-vehicular cyclist. That spot pushes the skills unless you get very lucky with the timing.
  5.  


    This is a view of north bound Nimitz coming toward us, as it passes under the Voltaire Street bridge first and then the Famosa Boulevard bridge closer to us. The Bike Lanes along here are reasonably wide and in good shape. The width of the vehicular traffic lane seems plenty wide also, giving good separation between vehicles and bicyclist.



    This is just a quick view down the ramp toward Nimitz from the top of the Famosa Blvd bridge. Share the Road!




    This is a view from the Famosa Boulevard bridge looking north along Nimitz Boulevard toward West Point Loma Boulevard. On the right is a high speed on ramp, going down hill and merging at the bottom with Nimitz Blvd. This ramp handles a very large level of traffic, both in the morning and in the evening. This is where Catalina Boulevard funnels all the traffic from Point Loma's residents, Navy Base, and schools onto Nimitz Boulevard northbound toward the Highway 8 and also Highway 5 access points. Bicyclist have to contend with a lot of high speed vehicles merging into the Nimitz lane. Notice the shoddy Bike Lane painting just at this juncture. On Nimitz Blvd both the outside lane and the Bike Lane narrow down to accommodate the ramp on the east side. The Bike Lane after this point is shifted to the right and bicyclist must cross the high speed traffic to get over to the Bike Lane. Very sketchy to say the least.




    This is the view as you continue on Nimitz Boulevard going north toward West Point Loma Blvd and the Highway/Sunset Cliffs Bridge intersection. Once you get over to the Bike Lane, it's not so bad. Dealing with a long flow of traffic coming down the ramp can make the task very difficult. They do have a YIELD sign but often they just barrel along, trying to squeeze in. Another difficult high speed ramp on a city street.
  6.  


    The bicyclist in this image had just crossed over the Sunset Cliffs Bridge but I wasn't able to get that shot. He has moved from the Bike Lane along Sunset Cliffs Boulevard into the lane that will split off to become Nimitz Boulevard south. Notice the white truck and white SUV behind him. The women in the white SUV was being cautious and giving the bicyclist some space. The guys in the white truck were trying to merge into the same lane as the SUV.



    As the bicyclist continued along, he did a good job of taking the lane (if a little to the side) and just rolling with the flow to follow Nimitz southbound. The white SUV followed behind and the white truck tried to jam themselves into the lane. The driver was all on the horn and just being a major jerk. The bicyclist had to listen to it and wonder what was happing behind him. Very disconcerting to say the least.



    As it ended up the truck had to straddle two lanes while the light cycled, because he couldn't merge properly. This section of road sees all sorts of bad behavior. I stayed a while as I was collecting images and was mostly cringing as I watched the foolishness in front of my eyes. This is another difficult place for bicyclist contending with high speed merging vehicles.
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013 edited
     
    Re: N/b Nimitz approaching ramp to 8 east...

    Staying far right too long is probably one of the most common errors made by even cyclists with decades of experience that makes cycling in traffic seem more difficult and/or dangerous than it really is.

    Here the sign indicating two through lanes are to the left of traffic Y-ing right to the freeway gives early indication of the need to merge left, as the sign is placed where the BL ends, so you see it much earlier.

    The BL itself ends, and the adjacent lane begins to widen, about where you need to merge left. I say "about" because the exact location varies based on other traffic. But even if it's busy an assertive left arm signal will cause someone to slow and let you in. I never have an issue negotiating for a gap like that. If one is not clearly assertive with that hand signal it's hard to imagine because their experience is likely to be fraught with being ignored by motorists. I cannot stress too much how critical a straight arm, parallel to the ground, not angled down at all, is in such a situation.

    The reason the lane gets that wide is to allow those headed for the freeway to separate (tend right) from those going straight to the bridge (tend left). Bicyclists of course fall in the latter category and need to get left of the space used by those headed to the on ramp. The sooner the better.

    It's sad that so few know how to safely and comfortably navigate through such intersections. A crying shame, really, that all too often leads to tragedy.
  7.  


    A bicyclist riding across the Sunset Cliffs / Nimitz merge heading northbound. In this shot, traffic on Nimitz Boulevard (to the left) is stopped at the red light and the way is mostly clear. This is just an accident of timing. If the bike is just a few seconds later, he'll be dealing with all that traffic heading north across the Sunset Cliffs bridge. This also is a high speed merge and can be difficult to navigate as a bicyclist.



    That's enough for tonight.
    I wanted to provide some documented examples for use in Tuesday's San Diego City Council meeting.
    I hope to be there. "Safe Streets ~ Save Lives!"

    Ride well and be safe out there.

    OKB

    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013 edited
     
    What's good about these OKB is that they, unlike many of the interchanges like CM Blvd / 805, are within the domain of the city of SD. I'm pretty sure all of Nimitz is city of SD, and even at the merge onto 8, I think only the ramp itself is Caltrans.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013 edited
     
    Since he happens to be on a recumbent, he has or should have a decent mirror. Maintain situation awareness and all of that.

    Looking at this on a big screen, he apparently does have a mirror.

    Old Knotty Buoy:
    As the bicyclist continued along, he did a good job of taking the lane (if a little to the side) and just rolling with the flow to follow Nimitz southbound. The white SUV followed behind and the white truck tried to jam themselves into the lane. The driver was all on the horn and just being a major jerk. The bicyclist had to listen to it and wonder what was happing behind him. Very disconcerting to say the least.
    • CommentAuthorPetteri
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013 edited
     
    Serge2:So while we are working on that, we should also try to do things that will make a significant difference. Like improve cyclist skills and behavior. It is possible to navigate these interchanges safely, even if not everyone is 100% attentive all the time, and it's not difficult to learn.


    OK, I bite: How? How do you navigate an intersection safely when you have multiple lanes of traffic and people merging at you at 40mph?

    You can take the lane all you want and be an assertive vehicular cyclist, but unless you are surrounded by a ton of metal and keeping up with 40mph traffic you are going to be in serious trouble in many of the onramps coming onto Clairemont Mesa Blvd for example. Heck, I find them sketchy in a car given the total lack of lane discipline and signaling around here, but at least in a modern car I can be pretty sure I'll survive a 40mph accident.

    I have been riding for thirty-odd years and spend enough time in a car most weeks, and still cannot figure out how to for example safely cross the 805 going west on Clairemont Mesa Boulevard. Yes you can take the right lane, but you'll have people merging on the same lane from the right from the 805, people rushing past you on the left lane only to right hook and merge quickly to exit onto the 805, and all the regular traffic going straight.

    Needless to say I don't ride that way. My commute has a couple of pretty questionable merges but I generally do not fear for my life at them, even in the dark, chiefly because they at least don't mix on- and offramps. I can deal with southbound Genesee at the I-5 merge, and northbound Mission Bay Dr at I-5, so I'm not exactly a beginner here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013 edited
     
    Thanks for the great reviews, OKB!

    Petteri:
    Serge2:You have to merge left earlier there.
    OK, I bite:
    Please don't - for some it is incomprehensible that their way may not work for everybody else, including those who are timid, inexperienced, without health or life insurance, with loved ones at home, or - perhaps, above all - those who have considered, but rejected, the notion of riding our streets because of inadequate, biased or non-inclusive roadway design.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013
     
    As thread starter, please keep this thread to only a listing of the dangerous interchanges. This is NOT a thread about yet another idiotic discussion about taking the lane. Please power BSNYC's blog some place else.

    Thank you for being considerate.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSmorg
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013
     
    When some of these merges are really busy, it's probably safer to just stop at the curbside and wait for a break in traffic, I think. Of course, there are places where even that isn't a safe thing to do; like that merge in Del Mar when you come southbound (up a little hill) and Jimmy Durante Rd, I think, merges in from your right. There's really no place to safely wait there... no curb, just lines on the road.

    I get by okay there most of the time since I'm fit enough to accelerate with traffic on that hill, though I got caught behind a slow rider going at her limit at that merge once, tho, and she decided to stop cold in that no man's land triangle formed by the white street line. That was one of the few times I got really scared riding on a road. Stopped in the middle of traffic with cars speeding by on both sides. :P
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2013 edited
     
    It's possible to believe in V.C. and think that these high speed ramps on surface roads set bicyclists, pedestrians and even motorists up for failure. They are a bad idea. Yes, it's possible, with training, to negotiate them safely. However, they are so bad that you have to have well developed skills to read the timing and negotiate through them safely. They are inherently bad designs. While I fully support any efforts to get more people educated on how to ride safely, the ability to negotiate these safely does not in any way mitigate the need to get rid of these travesties of road design.
    • CommentAuthorSerge2
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2013
     
    I shared my views re: pedestrian issue <a href="http://sdbikecommuter.com/forums/comments.php?DiscussionID=235&page=4#Item_11">here</a>.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2013
     
    list
    •  
      CommentAuthorSmorg
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2013
     
    Just thought of another one! University Ave going east at Chollas Pkwy, which merges in at high speed from the right. The one spot on University Ave that I really dislike (so I usually take El Cajon Blvd instead when I head east to go up Mt Helix).
  8.  
    I'll chime in here with one from north San Diego. Another highway crossing in the same form as Clairemont Mesa Blvd or Balboa Ave, this intersection on Del Mar Heights Rd and I-5. In its current shape, it's already not good, but they're planning to widen the ramps even more! As part of a future mixed-use development nearby, the developers have agreed to fund reconstruction of this intersection to reduce traffic congestion...by widening and adding car lanes. Other intersections in this part of town (like Loma Santa Fe, Carmel Valley Rd, etc) have similar, if not worse designs, but I highlight Del Mar Heights because there is pending construction on this spot in the near future. I'm not opposed to developers developing. I'm not opposed to reducing traffic congestion, but this intersection MUST be redesigned with pedestrians and cyclists in mind. It can either be a modern eco-friendly transportation example for others to follow or another car-centric death trap.
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2013
     
    Smorg:Just thought of another one! University Ave going east at Chollas Pkwy, which merges in at high speed from the right. The one spot on University Ave that I really dislike (so I usually take El Cajon Blvd instead when I head east to go up Mt Helix).


    The City of San Diego Planning Division is doing a master plan for the Chollas Triangle (University, 54th, and Chollas Parkway) that should fix this problem. I couldn't find anything with proposed changes on the city's web site, but the planning effort should be wrapping up relatively soon. Then they just need to identify the money to implement the plan.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSmorg
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2013
     
    Stephan: The City of San Diego Planning Division is doing a master plan for the Chollas Triangle (University, 54th, and Chollas Parkway) that should fix this problem. I couldn't find anything with proposed changes on the city's web site, but the planning effort should be wrapping up relatively soon. Then they just need to identify the money to implement the plan.


    Very good to hear. Thanks, Stephan! :D I generally like riding on University Ave better than El Cajon Blvd with the exception of just that triangle. Hope it gets fixed soon!