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  1.  

    Motorized scooter riders cruise down the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Photo by Thomas Melville

    Governor signs no-helmet bill for motorized scooters
    September 25, 2018 sdnews.com
    Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill absolving adults from being required to wear helmets on electric scooters on city streets. Dockless vehicle company Bird backed the no-helmet law, AB 2989, which also permits scooters to be on streets with speed limits up to 35 mph. State law currently bans scooters on streets with speed limits exceeding 25 mph.

    Gov. Brown also signed AB 3077, which allows people under age 18, who’ve been cited for not wearing a bicycle helmet, to correct the violation within four months by attending a bicycle safety course and proving they now have a correct-fitting helmet.

    Both laws take effect Jan. 1, 2019.


    Electric scooter riders over 18 won’t be required to wear helmets. Mario Tama ~ Getty Images

    California removes helmet requirement for electric scooters
    The state is loosening safety regulations for the vehicles
    Elijah Chiland September 21, 2018 la.curbed.com
    Californians riding electric scooters will no longer be required to wear helmets, thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown Wednesday. It will take effect January 1, 2019.

    Under the new state law, only riders under the age of 18 will be required to don a helmet (though most dockless scooter companies prohibit riders under the age of 18). The new legislation updates statewide rules for the vehicles, but leaves room for communities to impose stricter safety standards. It’s unclear whether officials in Los Angeles will move to require helmets in the city.
    More in this article...
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2018
     
    The helmet thing was never going to work. People don't carry helmets on themselves.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 2nd 2018 edited
     
    SANDAG announces partnership with Lyft, Uber for Rideshare Week
    https://www.kusi.com/sandag-announces-partnership-with-lyft-uber-for-rideshare-week/
    SANDAG and its iCommute program are encouraging all San Diego residents to use public transit and ride-hailing services during Rideshare Week, which includes Free Ride Day on Oct. 2.

    Because no bike share companies were available?
  2.  


    We’re celebrating Free Transit Day with @SDMTS at the Old Town Transit Center where we’ll be giving away free helmets and a free ride code!

    Bird @BirdRide
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 2nd 2018
     
    Early Bird?
    Emalia Earhart
    (from Linkedin post by Ashwini Chhabra)
  3.  

    Free Bird!
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:

    You know there is going to be a little Lynyrd Skynyrd posted shortly!
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2018
     
    TIMBER bell
    https://www.mtbbell.com/about.html

    Last week as a scooter rider approached a group of pedestrians blocking the access ramp on the sidewalk, I heard the scooter rider gently announce a soft road runner esque "mheep, mheep".

    Seems pedestrians are often surprised by passing scooters, would something as simple as a bell help reduce conflict?

    For example, MTB's often use trail bells as a friendly warning to hikers of approaching bicycles and I use a group of jingle bells secured to a strap over my handlebar stem to warn pedestrians of my approach on bike paths/lanes.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2018 edited
     
    gottobike:TIMBER bell
    https://www.mtbbell.com/about.html

    Last week as a scooter rider approached a group of pedestrians blocking the access ramp on the sidewalk, I heard the scooter rider gently announce a soft road runner esque "mheep, mheep".

    Seems pedestrians are often surprised by passing scooters, would something as simple as a bell help reduce conflict?

    For example, MTB's often use trail bells as a friendly warning to hikers of approaching bicycles and I use a group of jingle bells secured to a strap over my handlebar stem to warn pedestrians of my approach on bike paths/lanes.


    Spurcycle's (bells) service is extraordinary. I had one of the original, Kickstarter bells and the volume had decreased over time. They told me that the rubber parts had been improved and shipped me the new parts gratis. Works great.

    I do like the TIMBER Bell's approach though. That might be the trick for scooters.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2018
     
  4.  
    BADGE COMPANY: Town Council questions and honors fire and police
    Corey Levitan October 17, 2018 lajollalight.com
    District 1 Council member Barbara Bry also addressed the forum, outlining her own legislative public-safety goals…

    She also promised to deliver to Mayor Kevin Faulconer guidelines on how to move forward on the dockless bikes and scooters issue. “I think they need to be regulated, they need to pay fees,” Bry said. “There are no rules right now, and that is not a good thing for any of us.

    Later, La Jolla resident Bill Robbins complained about the “dern bikes” and scooters he’s still regularly pulling out of the Pacific — even after some of the bike companies seem to go out of business. “They’re a dangerous thing,” Robbins said. “Yes, Barbara’s working on an ordinance, but I really think with the resources you have, you can find a way to declare them a public nuisance and have them picked up … Work out a system with the City attorney where they have so many days to get them out and or they get fined a hundred dollars a day.
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----

    FRYE ON THE WALL: Art of an ex-City Council member comes to La Jolla
    By Corey Levitan October 17, 2018 lajollalight.com
    Dockless bikes
    I do not understand how it is that someone can take their private property and just arbitrarily, randomly distribute it on public property to make a profit. I could just run around and what – leave rocks all over the place? Just say, I like those, so let’s just put rocks there, and if you take one, pay me for it. It’s ridiculous. I’m not commenting on the bikes, right? I’m commenting on commonsense principle that you do not allow private companies to simply distribute their goods and services wherever they want with no regulations. It makes no damn sense. Not to mention the people who rent businesses on the beach who rent bicycles, who pay for a storefront and employees, who do all these things to be part of a community. So you just let people drive through in vans and dump their garbage on the sidewalk?
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----

    Elsewhere in the lajollalight.com

    Max Shenk of San Diego Fly Rides updated the board on the continuing progress made on branded La Jolla bike racks.
  5.  
    Report: San Diego Plans to Crack Down on Segway Tour Operators
    Chris Jennewein October 17, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego plans to crack down on local Segway tour operators following a $1.7 million injury settlement in June and another lawsuit filed last spring claiming a protruding sidewalk caused the death of a Segway rider two years ago, it was reported Wednesday. An ordinance proposed by city officials would require Segway tour companies to apply for special permits, follow safety procedures and obtain commercial liability insurance of at least $2 million per case and $4 million per year, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.
    In the case that led to the $1.7 million settlement, the tour company that rented out the Segway didn’t contribute to the payout because it didn’t have liability insurance and the company’s owner had limited assets, according to the Union-Tribune. In order to make sure the city’s new law would also apply to competitors, it refers to the vehicles as “electronic assistive personal mobility devices,” the Union-Tribune reported.
    The new law would not apply to the electric scooters that have become increasingly popular in San Diego this year, according to the Union-Tribune. City officials are exploring separate legislation for those devices.

    — City News Service
    More details in the article…
  6.  

    Dockless scooters in downtown San Diego. (Photo: Chris Jennewein)

    Mayor Faulconer Proposes Regulations for Dockless Scooters
    Debbie L. Sklar October 18, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced a suite of proposed regulations Thursday intended to improve dockless scooter safety and education.

    The regulations would require dockless scooter companies to limit the maximum speed of scooters in certain areas of the city, give monthly data reports to the city including data on things like reported incidents and trip information and educate scooter riders on local and state traffic laws as well as the cost of being cited for violating relevant laws. The companies would also have to indemnify the city from liability claims in the event a scooter rider is injured within city limits and obtain a permit from the city with accompanying operational fees.

    The rapid evolution of this industry is evidence of the popularity of dockless mobility devices as great options for folks who would like to leave their car at home,” Faulconer said. “As with many disruptive new technologies, there are issues that need to be addressed. First and foremost, public safety is our top priority and that will be reflected in these common- sense regulations.

    Scooter companies such as Lime, Bird and Razor would have to use geofencing technology to limit scooter speeds to 8 mph in the city’s high- traffic zones like the San Diego Convention Center promenade, Balboa Park, NTC Park and the Embarcadero downtown. Currently, dockless scooters can reach speeds up to roughly 15 mph.

    The City Council’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee plans to discuss the proposed regulations at its 9 a.m. meeting on Oct. 24.

    I’m pleased to have worked with Mayor Faulconer to develop important safety standards for the protection of scooter riders and pedestrians,” said City Councilwoman and Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee Member Lorie Zapf. “My goal has always been to slow down the speed of the scooters and address safety concerns. With this proposal I feel confident that we will see changes for the better.

    –City News Service
  7.  

    Two Razor EcoSmart scooters next to an MTS trolley. Courtesy of Razor

    Razor Introduces Dockless Scooter with Seat and Basket to San Diego
    Chris Jennewein October 21, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Razor upped the ante in the San Diego dockless scooter wars last week with the introduction of a model having both a seat and basket. The Cerritos-based company said its Razor Share EcoSmart was designed for long rides and errands. It has a large, padded seat and front-mounted basket.

    “Our new shared dockless EcoSmart scooter was built for a better ride for San Diegans,” said Danny Simon, chief operating officer. “EcoSmart gives the rider an option of standing or sitting while on the scooter that will benefit longer rides encouraging even more San Diegans to leave their car at home.”

    The new model can travel up to 15 mph and has a hand-operated rear disk brake for safety.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2018 edited
     

    Here Are the Results of Portland's E-Scooter Survey
    https://www.portlandmercury.com/blogtown/2018/10/22/23908482/here-are-the-results-of-portlands-e-scooter-survey
    When asked, "What changes would encourage you to use e-scooters more often?", 58 percent said they wanted "more e-scooters available," 44 percent responded wanted "safer places to ride (e.g. bike lanes or paths separated from vehicles)" and 9 percent were irredeemable dorks who want "e-scooters with seats."

    And of course, I represent the 9 percent..
  8.  


    I feel like I'm flying!
  9.  

    Bird electric scooters being delivered on Pacific Highway in downtown San Diego. Photo by Chris Jennewein

    City Council Committee OKs Dockless Scooter Regulations
    Chris Jennewein October 24, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    The San Diego City Council’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee unanimously voted Wednesday to send a suite of proposed regulations on dockless scooters to the full council. Mayor Kevin Faulconer introduced the regulations Oct. 18 after the city spent months wrestling with how to both ensure public safety and allow dockless scooter companies like Bird, Lime and Razor to continue operating in San Diego.
    Faulconer’s proposal would mandate that scooter companies limit the maximum speed of scooters in high-traffic areas of the city, send monthly data reports to the city detailing things like parking and trip information, educate riders on local traffic laws, and indemnify the city for liability for riders injured within city limits. The companies would also have to obtain an annual permit and pay associated operational fees.

    The rapid evolution of this industry is evidence of the popularity of dockless mobility devices as great options for folks who would like to leave their car at home,” Faulconer said when he announced the proposal. “As with many disruptive new technologies, there are issues that need to be addressed. First and foremost, public safety is our top priority and that will be reflected in these common-sense regulations.
    Residents voiced their opposition to the scooters at both the committee session and a meeting of the full City Council last month, when representatives from the three companies reported on ways they’re attempting to make the scooters safer to use in busy areas. One part of the proposal by both Faulconer and the scooter companies is using the GPS information on each scooter to limit speeds from 15 mph to 8 mph in areas like Balboa Park, the downtown embarcadero and various boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach and La Jolla. This “geofencing” technology has been available for roughly six weeks, according to a Bird spokesman, and is already being implemented on the Santa Monica Beach Bike Path. Zapf proposed a ban on the use of scooters on city boardwalks last spring, but the City Council voted against the proposal, 6-3.
    Representatives of the public transit advocacy group Circulate San Diego and Razor USA joined Faulconer on Monday to discuss the proposal. “Razor has a proven track record of working with cities to create shared scooter programs that best address their particular needs. Since we launched in San Diego, we have collaborated with the mayor’s office, City Council and city staff to create a great last-mile solution for the city,” said Razor Government Affairs Manager Brandon Cheung. “We support regulations that will continue to encourage San Diegans to leave their car at home while enhancing rider and pedestrian safety.
    Zapf and Bry suggested a similar amendment to the proposed regulations during the committee meeting but Cate nixed it, suggesting that there will be time to add amendments at a later date either during a full council meeting or if the proposal returns to committee. Zapf also expressed support for adding larger notifications on the scooters about local and state traffic laws. “I don’t want people to be surprised, we don’t want to ding our tourists,” she said. “I’m not trying to be the fun police, I’m trying to be the safety police and I think there’s definitely a place for scooters … when responsible riders are riding them and they’re going to work and they’re doing the last mile.

    Bry said: “We’re already behind in getting something done. You understand the concerns that Councilmember Zapf and I have about their use in certain areas, so I think that needs to be looked at when we reconvene with a fuller framework to look at.
    Gomez said a lot of backlash to the scooters is due to riders using sidewalks because of a lack of suitable infrastructure to safely park and ride them on the street. “I cannot stress that we need the infrastructure for safer mobility because it’s not going to get solved by today’s actions,” Gomez said. “I think it’s a step in the right direction, but at the end of the day, if we are not creating paths for people to take, they’re going to take what’s safe.

    — City News Service
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2018
     

    Why New York EVERY City Should Welcome Electric Scooters on Its Streets
    http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/10/the-scooter-is-not-the-enemy.html
    So ask not whether scooters are safe enough for your city, but whether your city is safe enough for people to get around in without the need for armor.
  10.  

    Sam: "I would just ask the police if I could grab another one and swap one in its place.

    False alarm brings out police ingenuity
    Birds for security tape, Birds for homeless tents
    Mike Madriaga October 26, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    On the morning of October 24, Sam saw a photo tweeted by John Gibbins from the U-T. The photo depicted two San Diego police officers propping up yellow police tape on two Bird motorized scooters on B Street; it was captioned: “UT building downtown has been evacuated after suspicious pkgs found at entrance. State [Senator Kamala] Harris and SDFD has offices in bldg also. Bomb squad at scene.”

    If it was one (Bird) that I was after, I would just ask them (police officers) if I could grab another one and swap one in its place,” Sam said. Sam, a Bird mechanic and charger, was picking up Bird scooters on F Street and loading them in the back of his Jeep a few blocks away from where the bomb-scare happened on 600 B Street. “I’m not hating on the way people are using the Birds,” he said.
    I think it’s great that the police used the scooters [earlier],” Christine said, “the homeless use them for tent [frames] like the police did with the tape.” Christine owns a coffee-cart business in front of the U-T building and was about 12 feet away from five Birds on the sidewalk.

    Recently when I just got on a Bird, I was immediately pulled over and I got a $238 ticket for being on the sidewalk right here,” said Antoinette as she ordered a latte.
  11.  

    John and Julia, from LA, get ready to ride Bird scooters down the boardwalk. Thomas Melville Beach & Bay Press

    Pacific Beach planners discuss newly proposed scooter regs, suggest more
    Dave Schwab November 01, 2018 sdnews.com
    Community planners vetting the issue on Oct. 24 followed unanimous approval that day of a City Council committee’s endorsement of Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s proposed new regulations of dockless scooters.

    Scooter companies are using our infrastructure and not paying for anything,” contended Beckett, who’s been documenting widespread law violations by local scooter riders. “Each scooter should have a license plate, and riders should be required to scan their driver’s license each time they ride to prevent use by underage riders” (Bird scooter riders are required to scan their driver’s licenses).

    Becket issued a handout with a laundry list of suggestions for new scooter regulations that included: cost-recovery fees from companies to provide law enforcement; company fees for bike/scooter lane development and maintenance; citations and fines for adults unlocking scooters for underage riders; and citations/fines for scooter companies whose vehicles block ADA ramps, sidewalks, businesses or private property.
    More in the story.
  12.  
    Planning Group weighs-in on Pacific Beach transit concerns: Wants stricter controls on scooter use
    Linda Hutchison November 7, 2018 lajollalight.com
    The Pacific Beach Planning Group focused on transportation issues at its Oct. 24 meeting at the PB Library. These included community concerns about electric scooters and future bus routes and connections to the Mid-Coast Trolley.

    Electric Scooters Update:
    Eve Anderson, chair of the Streets & Sidewalks subcommittee, presented two letters about electric scooters for discussion and approval: one to Mayor Kevin Faulconer and the San Diego City Council listing the concerns of Pacific Beach residents and another responding to the Mayor's recent proposal for regulation of electric scooters. (The Dockless Scooters Regulatory Framework was presented at the Oct. 22 City Council meeting after the Council agreed to re-address the issue.) The letters were drafted after Anderson's Oct. 10 subcommittee meeting. Normally about 10 people attend these meetings, but this one drew three times that number, Anderson reported. It included the community manager of Bird scooters and three representatives of the San Diego Police Department's Northern Division.

    "I've never seen an issue affect so many people," Anderson said. "The main concern is public safety, as many scooter-riders ignore speeding and traffic regulations, use sidewalks, double up, lack a driver's license, and leave scooters in areas where they can block traffic or cause harm." She added that since the beginning of the year, Northern Division has issued 1,660 citations for riding electric scooters without a helmet (required for those under age 18) and 1,774 total citations for other reasons.

    The Planning Group voted to approve both letters, the first listing concerns, and the second with added suggestions for improving the Mayor's proposed regulations. The proposed regulations focus on five areas: limiting speed, City indemnification, rider education, data sharing and operational fees. The Planning Group suggested adding way-finding signage and mobility infrastructure. The Planning Group would also like to see more designated parking areas, the use of technology to limit speed and unsafe parking, more data sharing with the scooter companies, stricter enforcement and more wide-ranging fees (such as an annual ministerial permit fee and a per-device fee).

    Responding to growing complaints about safety, the Mayor's proposal limits scooter speeds in high-traffic areas (such as the Mission Beach and Pacific Beach boardwalks) to 8 mph and calls for increased use of geo-fencing to prohibit unsafe scooter parking. The proposed framework, including feedback from community planning groups, will be considered by the City Council early next year.
  13.  

    WIND

    City of San Diego Bicycling
    Pedestrian, Bicycle, and Traffic Safety Issues: If you find a problem on our roads that needs immediate attention, a pothole or to request street maintenance, report it to the City Services via the City of San Diego “Get it Done” App, or by calling 619-527-7500.

    Report a problem with a rideshare bicycle or scooter to the responsible company.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2018
     
    These newfangled scooter contraptions aren’t all that new after all:

    “Postmen on scooters in Washington DC, 1917”.

  14.  

    They didn’t seem fazed at all with the cars whizzing by them.

    Scooters on the Coronado bridge
    They probably got on from Cesar Chavez Parkway
    Mike Madriaga Nov. 13, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    On November 12, Steve Paen saw a photo of two people riding Lime scooters on the Coronado Bridge; he wasn’t impressed; he’s seen this before. “These riders were heading into Coronado,” he said. Last month, Paen who works at McP’s Irish Pub on the island, saw a larger group of motorized scooters on the two mile long bridge.

    I wish I would’ve been able to snag a picture,” he said, “but I was just trying to abide the ‘hands-free’ law while driving. On October 4 at around 10 as I was heading into work, I saw what looked like seven or eight kids riding Lime scooters down the Coronado Bridge in the slow lane and heading inbound to the island. They didn’t seem fazed at all with the cars whizzing by them. I can only imagine the max speed on those things is 15 mph, but put against me traveling at 55-60 mph: it’s not very safe for both the scooter gang and [us drivers] having to share the freeway.” Paen added that the “teenagers” weren’t wearing helmets, mandatory in California for anyone operating motorized scooters under 18.

    Michael, an avid scooter rider, saw the photos of the the two Lime scooters on the bridge. “They [probably] got on from Cesar E. Chavez Parkway before it hits Logan Avenue (by Chicano Park),” he said. According to the Department of Motor Vehicles website: “On roads without bicycle lanes, motorized scooters may operate where the speed limit is 25 mph or less.” …. but the speed limit on the Coronado Bridge is 55 mph, and there are no bike lanes.

    A NBC 7 San Diego news report in March: “The Coronado City Council declared dockless scooters and bikes a public nuisance at a meeting …. [and] dockless ride companies aren’t even permitted in the city, but because you can ride and drop them off anywhere, they make their way to the island.

    Paen, from Pacific Beach, has seen some crazy stuff done with the motorized scooters in his neighborhood — including a guy riding a Bird scooter down a steep cliff which lead to Law Street Beach where he “munched it” real bad. “Bird scooters cut down on traffic and help the environment, but on the other side of the coin you see stuff like this.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2018
     
    They do not have a suicide wish. They are not permanent scofflaws. They just want to go from A to B: Why are there no bike- or ped facilities on Coronado Bridge? [rhetorical]
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeNov 15th 2018 edited
     
    Protect them!

    Old Knotty Buoy:https://media.sandiegoreader.com/img/photos/2018/11/13/scooters-coronado-bridge_t658.jpg?ff95ca2b4c25d2d6ff3bfb257febf11d604414e5
    They didn’t seem fazed at all with the cars whizzing by them.

    Scooters on the Coronado bridge
    They probably got on from Cesar Chavez Parkway
    Mike Madriaga Nov. 13, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    On November 12, Steve Paen saw a photo of two people riding Lime scooters on the Coronado Bridge; he wasn’t impressed; he’s seen this before. “These riders were heading into Coronado,” he said. Last month, Paen who works at McP’s Irish Pub on the island, saw a larger group of motorized scooters on the two mile long bridge.

    I wish I would’ve been able to snag a picture,” he said, “but I was just trying to abide the ‘hands-free’ law while driving. On October 4 at around 10 as I was heading into work, I saw what looked like seven or eight kids riding Lime scooters down the Coronado Bridge in the slow lane and heading inbound to the island. They didn’t seem fazed at all with the cars whizzing by them. I can only imagine the max speed on those things is 15 mph, but put against me traveling at 55-60 mph: it’s not very safe for both the scooter gang and [us drivers] having to share the freeway.” Paen added that the “teenagers” weren’t wearing helmets, mandatory in California for anyone operating motorized scooters under 18.

    Michael, an avid scooter rider, saw the photos of the the two Lime scooters on the bridge. “They [probably] got on from Cesar E. Chavez Parkway before it hits Logan Avenue (by Chicano Park),” he said. According to the Department of Motor Vehicles website: “On roads without bicycle lanes, motorized scooters may operate where the speed limit is 25 mph or less.” …. but the speed limit on the Coronado Bridge is 55 mph, and there are no bike lanes.

    A NBC 7 San Diego news report in March: “The Coronado City Council declared dockless scooters and bikes a public nuisance at a meeting …. [and] dockless ride companies aren’t even permitted in the city, but because you can ride and drop them off anywhere, they make their way to the island.

    Paen, from Pacific Beach, has seen some crazy stuff done with the motorized scooters in his neighborhood — including a guy riding a Bird scooter down a steep cliff which lead to Law Street Beach where he “munched it” real bad. “Bird scooters cut down on traffic and help the environment, but on the other side of the coin you see stuff like this.
  15.  


    Uber drops 300 electric bikes in San Diego. Will they last?

    Brittany Meiling November 19, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Despite the fast failures of bike sharing companies in San Diego, which suffered from the exuberant embrace of electric scooters in their stead, it seems the city is getting yet another e-bike player. And this one has stability on its side. Uber announced Monday it is rolling out a fleet of electric bikes throughout San Diego called Jump. These bright red bikes come equipped with baskets and give users an electric boost while they pedal, letting cyclists travel up to 20 miles per hour without breaking a sweat. Uber is deploying 300 of these bikes across a 28 square-mile radius, largely concentrated in the beach communities and downtown San Diego. The company plans to ramp that up if demand warrants it, eventually expanding its service area to 95 square-miles by the end of the year. To help spur adoption, the company is offering free trips locally from now until Dec. 9. After that, they’ll cost $1 to unlock and 10 cents per minute to ride.

    But will the red bikes stick? Alternative transportation has been a hot and crowded space this year, with companies exiting nearly as quickly as they’ve arrived. This year, the dockless bike industry’s top companies — all rolling in hundreds of millions of venture capital — have cruised into San Diego to battle for the loyalty of urban residents. While electric scooters have flourished, dockless bikes have struggled to stick around.

    The yellow bikes from Ofo were some of the first to debut in San Diego, but disappeared from the streets this summer. Mobike rolled in — and back out — in a heartbeat. A local favorite — Lime — originally deployed a fleet of green and white electric bikes en masse in San Diego, but even they appear to have retracted e-bikes in favor of e-scooters. Although the company didn’t respond for comment as of press time, the Lime app is dominated by scooters. No e-bikes in sight.

    Does Uber have an edge?

    And yet, Uber believes the San Diego market is full of potential. In April, the ride-sharing giant decided to get in on the dockless bike action, acquiring Jump Bikes, a New York-based bikesharing company that already had its e-bikes deployed in 40 cities at the time. Since then, Uber has been expanding the e-bikes to new cities. They’ve also deployed electric scooters in select cities, including Austin, Santa Monica and Los Angeles. Uber’s Mike Egziabher, who’s general manager of Jump’s Southern California region, said the company has already seen success in other California markets. In San Francisco, the company started with only 250 bikes, but doubled that to 500 after their data showed 38,000 people took 326,000 trips during the pilot phase. And they’ve seen similar responses in Sacramento and Los Angeles.

    We think that this success will carry over into San Diego, not only because of the city’s topography and favorable climate, but also because of the large number of tourists who need affordable and easy ways to get around there,” Egziabher said. Plus, they’ve got an advantage over other competitors, he said. “Our riders are already familiar with Uber, and can access a wide range of transportation options right from the app.” Egziabher said Uber’s planning on rolling out e-scooters in San Diego in the near future.
  16.  
    (cont.)
    City still embracing dockless mobility, despite some concerns

    While city officials have long applauded the use of bikes and other modes of alternative transportation to meet sustainability goals, the deployment of more e-bikes may not be universally welcomed. In the city of San Diego, where long-promised bicycle lanes have yet to fully materialize, many scooter users have taken to riding on sidewalks, frustrating business and unnerving pedestrians. Injuries — befalling both pedestrians and riders themselves — have spurred lawsuits against electric scooter companies and stoked public concern over a lack of regulation.

    Despite safety and cost concerns over the past year, the City Council repeatedly pushed the issue onto the back burner. Following months of public outcry, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced last month a proposal to regulate dockless mobility devices throughout the city, including restricting speeds in select areas and requiring companies to share ridership data.

    City spokesperson Anna Vacchi said the city remains a proponent of more mobility options for residents and visitors because that’s consistent with climate action plan goals. “The rapid evolution of this industry is evidence of the popularity of dockless mobility devices as great options for folks who would like to leave their car at home,” Faulconer said in a statement last month. “As with many disruptive new technologies, there are issues that need to be addressed. First and foremost, public safety is our top priority and that will be reflected in these common-sense regulations.

    Uber’s Egziabher said the company did not need a permit to operate in the city, but that the company has been “working with the mayor’s office and city council throughout the development of their permit process.” “We are looking forward to continuing to work with the city on the development of, and compliance with, local regulatory priorities,” he said.



    The Jump bike comes equipped with a basket and an electric boost with every pedal. (Courtesy/ Uber)
    Uber Jump Bikes
    Introducing JUMP
    Now you can find and rent an electric bike using your Uber app. Select Bike, and enjoy the ride.
    Move through traffic faster, easily ride up hills, and reach your destination without breaking a sweat.
    How Jump Designed a Global Electric Bike
    Pia Ceres October 8, 2018 wired.com
  17.  
    Pacific Beach Town Council finds E-scooter problems growing faster than solutions
    Steven Mihailovich November 21. 2018 lajollalight.com
    The first rules to address mounting problems created by the explosive growth of dockless electronic scooter rentals (operated by companies like Bird and Lime) cleared the City Council's Public Safety & Livable Neighborhoods Committee last month. Yet to hear the discussion on e-scooters at the Pacific Beach Town Council meeting Oct. 17, regulations can't come fast enough or go far enough for the residents who've been most impacted by the contraptions since their launch in PB earlier this year.

    Despite a last-minute cancellation by Bird representative Sophie Beckerman, officials from San Diego Police , Lifeguards and the City Attorney's office were on hand to take questions, but admitted that efforts to control the scooters can't keep up with their meteoric rise. "Unfortunately, all we can do right now is provide as much enforcement as we can with our limited resources," said Police Lt. Steven Waldheim of the Northern Division. "But problems have just been ongoing."

    Waldheim noted that almost 1,700 of the citations in the beach area and boardwalk were for riding without a helmet, a restriction set to be lifted next year with the passage of a recent state law. Other violations cited were riding on the sidewalk in the business district, riding with a passenger and not having a driver's license.

    Lifeguard Lt. Rick Romero said his PB unit has been called to about 100 incidents of e-scooter accidents and many resulted in injuries that run the gamut. "Abrasions, people getting knocked down, knocking other people down on the Boardwalk to serious trauma, head trauma, being transported to the hospital. It's all ranges," he said.
    Much more in this important article...
  18.  
    Scooter lobbyists behind scenes
    Matt Potter November 21, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    e-scooter pay-off:
    The Mineta Transportation Institute at San Jose State University is out with a study likely to gladden the hearts of San Diego e-scooter riders, plagued by a rash of accidents and beset by neighbors angered by cluttered sidewalks. “Of the 530 e-scooters MTI researchers observed and photographed in downtown San Jose, 97% were well-parked,” according to the November 14 report.
    More in article...
  19.  

    I’ve made $250 in 30 hours — that works out to a profit of $8.33 per hour. But I’ve also spent $55 on gas. (From Reader story in July)
    (Image by Matthew Suárez)

    Frontal attack on gig economy
    Suit against Lime to end freelance scooter work?
    News Ticker November 23, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    A Northern California man working as a "Juicer" for electric scooter-share operator Lime has filed suit against the company, claiming it improperly classifies thousands of workers as independent contractors in a system designed to skirt minimum wage laws and other employee protections.
    More in article…
  20.  

    "They lit one of my piñatas on fire."

    Scooter bullies
    When will San Diego crack down?
    Mike Madriaga November. 27, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    About two weeks ago I was driving eastbound on University Avenue in Cherokee Point. I noticed two teens riding Bird scooters on the sidewalk traveling in the same direction and as they passed Noelia’s Party Boutique by 37th, one teen punched the hanging piñatas sending one crashing down.

    They knock down my piñatas once a week,” Noelia said. “They don’t respect us.” Around her area and westbound towards North Park; kids on motorized scooters have reportedly been bullying and taunting the locals. I spoke to Noelia on Thanksgiving weekend. “With these scooters it’s very dangerous,” she said. “Three people told me they were hit by them and they are causing accidents on the streets.

    Noelia’s neighbor said: “Some young, like 14-year-old kid comes barreling down the wrong way and almost runs into me and yells at me [then] hits my car with his hand. This is not my first or second encounter with a rider operating a scooter illegally — I have no sympathy for anyone hurt on them.
    Since this scooter stuff started, there’s a lot of problems here. When the Bird chargers stop by and they put four-to-five scooters there in front of my store — the kids drive by and [knock] them down when they pass by [riding their own scooters]. I don’t understand why the police does not regulate on them.
    This [bullying] is going to continue if the police doesn’t do anything,” Noelia said.
    More in article…
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeNov 27th 2018 edited
     
    Too many negative vibes from non-users: Let's have the people who actually use the scooters decide if they should be subjected to stricter regulation or not (saying this only partially tongue-in-cheek - after all, motorists get to decide enforceable speed limits).
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2018
     
    Maybe we just need magic carpets?
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2018 edited
     
    Be free from traffic and pollution
    https://www.bird.co/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Bird_Animation_v32_1.mp4
    Be free from traffic. Be free from pollution. Be free.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     

    Google Maps will now show you where the nearest Lime scooter is
    https://www.cnet.com/news/google-maps-will-now-show-you-where-the-nearest-lime-scooter-is/