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  1.  

    Motorized scooter riders cruise down the boardwalk in Mission Beach. Photo by Thomas Melville

    Governor signs no-helmet bill for motorized scooters
    September 25, 2018 sdnews.com
    Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill absolving adults from being required to wear helmets on electric scooters on city streets. Dockless vehicle company Bird backed the no-helmet law, AB 2989, which also permits scooters to be on streets with speed limits up to 35 mph. State law currently bans scooters on streets with speed limits exceeding 25 mph.

    Gov. Brown also signed AB 3077, which allows people under age 18, who’ve been cited for not wearing a bicycle helmet, to correct the violation within four months by attending a bicycle safety course and proving they now have a correct-fitting helmet.

    Both laws take effect Jan. 1, 2019.


    Electric scooter riders over 18 won’t be required to wear helmets. Mario Tama ~ Getty Images

    California removes helmet requirement for electric scooters
    The state is loosening safety regulations for the vehicles
    Elijah Chiland September 21, 2018 la.curbed.com
    Californians riding electric scooters will no longer be required to wear helmets, thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown Wednesday. It will take effect January 1, 2019.

    Under the new state law, only riders under the age of 18 will be required to don a helmet (though most dockless scooter companies prohibit riders under the age of 18). The new legislation updates statewide rules for the vehicles, but leaves room for communities to impose stricter safety standards. It’s unclear whether officials in Los Angeles will move to require helmets in the city.
    More in this article...
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2018
     
    The helmet thing was never going to work. People don't carry helmets on themselves.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 2nd 2018 edited
     
    SANDAG announces partnership with Lyft, Uber for Rideshare Week
    https://www.kusi.com/sandag-announces-partnership-with-lyft-uber-for-rideshare-week/
    SANDAG and its iCommute program are encouraging all San Diego residents to use public transit and ride-hailing services during Rideshare Week, which includes Free Ride Day on Oct. 2.

    Because no bike share companies were available?
  2.  


    We’re celebrating Free Transit Day with @SDMTS at the Old Town Transit Center where we’ll be giving away free helmets and a free ride code!

    Bird @BirdRide
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 2nd 2018
     
    Early Bird?
    Emalia Earhart
    (from Linkedin post by Ashwini Chhabra)
  3.  

    Free Bird!
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:

    You know there is going to be a little Lynyrd Skynyrd posted shortly!
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2018
     
    TIMBER bell
    https://www.mtbbell.com/about.html

    Last week as a scooter rider approached a group of pedestrians blocking the access ramp on the sidewalk, I heard the scooter rider gently announce a soft road runner esque "mheep, mheep".

    Seems pedestrians are often surprised by passing scooters, would something as simple as a bell help reduce conflict?

    For example, MTB's often use trail bells as a friendly warning to hikers of approaching bicycles and I use a group of jingle bells secured to a strap over my handlebar stem to warn pedestrians of my approach on bike paths/lanes.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2018 edited
     
    gottobike:TIMBER bell
    https://www.mtbbell.com/about.html

    Last week as a scooter rider approached a group of pedestrians blocking the access ramp on the sidewalk, I heard the scooter rider gently announce a soft road runner esque "mheep, mheep".

    Seems pedestrians are often surprised by passing scooters, would something as simple as a bell help reduce conflict?

    For example, MTB's often use trail bells as a friendly warning to hikers of approaching bicycles and I use a group of jingle bells secured to a strap over my handlebar stem to warn pedestrians of my approach on bike paths/lanes.


    Spurcycle's (bells) service is extraordinary. I had one of the original, Kickstarter bells and the volume had decreased over time. They told me that the rubber parts had been improved and shipped me the new parts gratis. Works great.

    I do like the TIMBER Bell's approach though. That might be the trick for scooters.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2018
     
  4.  
    BADGE COMPANY: Town Council questions and honors fire and police
    Corey Levitan October 17, 2018 lajollalight.com
    District 1 Council member Barbara Bry also addressed the forum, outlining her own legislative public-safety goals…

    She also promised to deliver to Mayor Kevin Faulconer guidelines on how to move forward on the dockless bikes and scooters issue. “I think they need to be regulated, they need to pay fees,” Bry said. “There are no rules right now, and that is not a good thing for any of us.

    Later, La Jolla resident Bill Robbins complained about the “dern bikes” and scooters he’s still regularly pulling out of the Pacific — even after some of the bike companies seem to go out of business. “They’re a dangerous thing,” Robbins said. “Yes, Barbara’s working on an ordinance, but I really think with the resources you have, you can find a way to declare them a public nuisance and have them picked up … Work out a system with the City attorney where they have so many days to get them out and or they get fined a hundred dollars a day.
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----

    FRYE ON THE WALL: Art of an ex-City Council member comes to La Jolla
    By Corey Levitan October 17, 2018 lajollalight.com
    Dockless bikes
    I do not understand how it is that someone can take their private property and just arbitrarily, randomly distribute it on public property to make a profit. I could just run around and what – leave rocks all over the place? Just say, I like those, so let’s just put rocks there, and if you take one, pay me for it. It’s ridiculous. I’m not commenting on the bikes, right? I’m commenting on commonsense principle that you do not allow private companies to simply distribute their goods and services wherever they want with no regulations. It makes no damn sense. Not to mention the people who rent businesses on the beach who rent bicycles, who pay for a storefront and employees, who do all these things to be part of a community. So you just let people drive through in vans and dump their garbage on the sidewalk?
    ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----

    Elsewhere in the lajollalight.com

    Max Shenk of San Diego Fly Rides updated the board on the continuing progress made on branded La Jolla bike racks.
  5.  
    Report: San Diego Plans to Crack Down on Segway Tour Operators
    Chris Jennewein October 17, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego plans to crack down on local Segway tour operators following a $1.7 million injury settlement in June and another lawsuit filed last spring claiming a protruding sidewalk caused the death of a Segway rider two years ago, it was reported Wednesday. An ordinance proposed by city officials would require Segway tour companies to apply for special permits, follow safety procedures and obtain commercial liability insurance of at least $2 million per case and $4 million per year, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.
    In the case that led to the $1.7 million settlement, the tour company that rented out the Segway didn’t contribute to the payout because it didn’t have liability insurance and the company’s owner had limited assets, according to the Union-Tribune. In order to make sure the city’s new law would also apply to competitors, it refers to the vehicles as “electronic assistive personal mobility devices,” the Union-Tribune reported.
    The new law would not apply to the electric scooters that have become increasingly popular in San Diego this year, according to the Union-Tribune. City officials are exploring separate legislation for those devices.

    — City News Service
    More details in the article…
  6.  

    Dockless scooters in downtown San Diego. (Photo: Chris Jennewein)

    Mayor Faulconer Proposes Regulations for Dockless Scooters
    Debbie L. Sklar October 18, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced a suite of proposed regulations Thursday intended to improve dockless scooter safety and education.

    The regulations would require dockless scooter companies to limit the maximum speed of scooters in certain areas of the city, give monthly data reports to the city including data on things like reported incidents and trip information and educate scooter riders on local and state traffic laws as well as the cost of being cited for violating relevant laws. The companies would also have to indemnify the city from liability claims in the event a scooter rider is injured within city limits and obtain a permit from the city with accompanying operational fees.

    The rapid evolution of this industry is evidence of the popularity of dockless mobility devices as great options for folks who would like to leave their car at home,” Faulconer said. “As with many disruptive new technologies, there are issues that need to be addressed. First and foremost, public safety is our top priority and that will be reflected in these common- sense regulations.

    Scooter companies such as Lime, Bird and Razor would have to use geofencing technology to limit scooter speeds to 8 mph in the city’s high- traffic zones like the San Diego Convention Center promenade, Balboa Park, NTC Park and the Embarcadero downtown. Currently, dockless scooters can reach speeds up to roughly 15 mph.

    The City Council’s Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee plans to discuss the proposed regulations at its 9 a.m. meeting on Oct. 24.

    I’m pleased to have worked with Mayor Faulconer to develop important safety standards for the protection of scooter riders and pedestrians,” said City Councilwoman and Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee Member Lorie Zapf. “My goal has always been to slow down the speed of the scooters and address safety concerns. With this proposal I feel confident that we will see changes for the better.

    –City News Service