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    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2018
     
    Shady John:You should see the debates about the dockless bikes, and especially the Bird electric scooters, on NextDoor here in SD (specifically PB/MB/LJ). Some of the points are valid, but the sense of entitlement that the drivers of cars feel is incredible. Actually, the sense of entitlement with respect to just about everything is incredible, but that's a topic for another forum.


    I had to stop reading those discussions. Just like when the subject of plastic bag bans came up it is simply amazing what contrived "arguments" people will come up with just to not have to adapt to anything new.
  1.  

    Dockless bikes from LimeBike and ofo are common in Uptown neighborhoods. (Photo by Sara Butler)

    Dockless bike craze
    Sara Butler March 9th, 2018 sduptownnews.com
    Walking around any of the Uptown neighborhoods lately, it’s hard not to spot them scattered on the sidewalks. No, the spectacle isn’t hipsters — but bright green and yellow bikes. In the last month, dockless bikes have appeared all around San Diego, with a high concentration located in the Uptown and Downtown areas. Two companies behind these bikes — LimeBike and ofo — both launched in the city of San Diego on February 15, 2018.
    This dockless model has raised a few concerns among residents, such as Trisha Kuhlmye, manager of the Liquid Eden Holistic Center located on the corner of Adams Avenue and 32nd Street. Though the bikes haven’t caused an issue for her business, she notices that they are often left out in the middle the sidewalk and pedestrian routes, including outside her store.

    “Our bikes are distributed throughout the Uptown neighborhoods,” said Zach Bartlett, LimeBike San Diego general manager. “We place bikes at locations in close proximity to transit routes so riders can easily find and ride our bikes. Bikes often end up back in these areas due to ridership to these neighborhoods and businesses.”
    Kensington resident Paul Jamason — who often uses LimeBike and ofo — thinks these bikes are an inexpensive alternative to driving, as well as help mitigate theft, provide transportation equity, and offer day-to-day convenience. “Dockless bikes are the solution to the ‘last-mile’ problem of public transit,” Jamason said. “I recently rode one from the SR-15 rapid bus stop on El Cajon Boulevard to my house, which saved me a 15-minute walk. And I use them to run errands around my neighborhood.”
    Andy Hanshaw, San Diego Bike Coalition Executive Director, pointed out that the bikes contribute to the city’s Climate Action Plan, which lists a 6 percent ridership goal by 2020. He notes that the GPS tracking system measures road-share, which will benefit future city planning for bikers. “[This program] will help determine where we need bike lanes … [the data] tells us where people are actually riding bikes and where we need safe infrastructure,” Hanshaw said.
    Though the LimeBikes and ofos are the most prevalent dockless bike brands in the Uptown arena, they aren’t the only two companies on the streets. Others — such as MoBike, JUMP, Spin, and Bird scooters — have also thrown their wheels into the ring.

    With only one month in, odds are the dockless bike craze will continue to gain momentum in the neighborhoods — and likely raise curious eyebrows of residents, business owners and tourists in the neighborhood.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCornelia
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2018
     
    batmick:
    Shady John:You should see the debates about the dockless bikes, and especially the Bird electric scooters, on NextDoor here in SD (specifically PB/MB/LJ). Some of the points are valid, but the sense of entitlement that the drivers of cars feel is incredible. Actually, the sense of entitlement with respect to just about everything is incredible, but that's a topic for another forum.


    I had to stop reading those discussions. Just like when the subject of plastic bag bans came up it is simply amazing what contrived "arguments" people will come up with just to not have to adapt to anything new.


    I like the idea of dockless bike sharing, but as somebody who likes to *walk* around town I have to say I find the amount of bikes abandoned in the middle of sidewalks or in landscaped areas really annoying. I hope this will get better after the initial phase and the bike sharing companies will get a better handle on distributing their bikes and educating their customers to be not such arseholes.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2018
     
    Cornelia:
    batmick:
    Shady John:You should see the debates about the dockless bikes, and especially the Bird electric scooters, on NextDoor here in SD (specifically PB/MB/LJ). Some of the points are valid, but the sense of entitlement that the drivers of cars feel is incredible. Actually, the sense of entitlement with respect to just about everything is incredible, but that's a topic for another forum.


    I had to stop reading those discussions. Just like when the subject of plastic bag bans came up it is simply amazing what contrived "arguments" people will come up with just to not have to adapt to anything new.


    I like the idea of dockless bike sharing, but as somebody who likes to *walk* around town I have to say I find the amount of bikes abandoned in the middle of sidewalks or in landscaped areas really annoying. I hope this will get better after the initial phase and the bike sharing companies will get a better handle on distributing their bikes and educating their customers to be not such arseholes.


    I would imagine a $5 fee for relocating a poorly-parked bike would do the trick?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2018
     
    t.e.d:
    Cornelia:
    batmick:
    Shady John:You should see the debates about the dockless bikes, and especially the Bird electric scooters, on NextDoor here in SD (specifically PB/MB/LJ). Some of the points are valid, but the sense of entitlement that the drivers of cars feel is incredible. Actually, the sense of entitlement with respect to just about everything is incredible, but that's a topic for another forum.


    I had to stop reading those discussions. Just like when the subject of plastic bag bans came up it is simply amazing what contrived "arguments" people will come up with just to not have to adapt to anything new.


    I like the idea of dockless bike sharing, but as somebody who likes to *walk* around town I have to say I find the amount of bikes abandoned in the middle of sidewalks or in landscaped areas really annoying. I hope this will get better after the initial phase and the bike sharing companies will get a better handle on distributing their bikes and educating their customers to be not such arseholes.


    I would imagine a $5 fee for relocating a poorly-parked bike would do the trick?


    You could mod the sharing app to provide that sort of incentive for people to ride the bikes out of low-demand locations to high demand areas.
  2.  
    Coronado to impound dockless bikes, fine companies
    Gustavo Solis March 20, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Dockless bicycles, those ubiquitous two-wheelers that have overtaken downtown San Diego, have been declared a public nuisance in Coronado. The city said it plans to impound the bikes if they are left in the public right-of-way — streets, sidewalks, alleys and public parks or beaches — and potentially charge the companies that lease them hundreds of dollars to get them back. Enforcement could begin Wednesday, said City Manager Blair King.
    Coronado didn’t expect to encounter those challenges. The city doesn’t allow the companies to operate. In December 2017, it denied business permits to LimeBike and other dockless bicycle companies. “However, the rampant use of dockless bicycles from neighboring cities has resulted in numerous dockless bicycles ending up in Coronado,” King said. Dockless bicycles from Imperial Beach and San Diego are making their way to the peninsula through the Coronado ferry and Silver Strand Boulevard. Locals have spotted bikes from LimeBike, ofo, and Mobike along Orange Avenue and state Route 75.
    Currently, Coronado can impound tagged bikes after 72 hours. Under the new enforcement policies, police officers will place tags on the dockless bikes. If they are not removed within two hours, the bikes will be impounded. Dockless bike companies can claim their impounded bicycles after paying a fee or citation. Coronado hasn’t determined exactly how much it will charge companies, but it is considering citations of $100 for the first violation, $200 for the second, and $500 for any subsequent violations.

    Ofo, a dockless bike company operating in San Diego, said the two-hour time frame is too narrow for them to respond. “It appears the paper notice serves as the sole notification mechanism, providing ofo with a very limited opportunity to rectify, which essentially makes the proposal an impoundment ordinance,” wrote Katie Stevens, ofo’s head of Public Policy — West. The company suggested other enforcement actions, such as having the city notify the company with an email instead of a tag.

    To date, the Coronado Police Department has impounded two dockless bicycles, said department spokesperson Lea Corbin. Coronado came up with the new policies after asking dockless bicycle companies to remove their bikes from the city in a timely manner. However, the city manager said, the companies “have so far provided inadequate response to those informal resolution efforts.”
    =======================
    t.e.d.
    I would imagine a $5 fee for relocating a poorly-parked bike would do the trick?

    bikingbill
    You could mod the sharing app to provide that sort of incentive for people to ride the bikes out of low-demand locations to high demand areas.
    Great ideas. Utilize the app to allow Police to notify companies of tags on specific bikes and encourage a "demand pricing" type solution for parking as well. Maybe lease or collect a city fee on some street side parking spaces from the bike share companies, so they can provide bike corrals to locate their bikes. It could be a win on many levels of analysis…
    • encourage the use of the bikes
    • solve the storage problem
    • collect fees for the city to help offset costs
    • get the bikes off the sidewalks
    • placate business concerns
    • demonstrate reduction of vehicle traffic, congestion, pollution, noise, public vehicle parking, etc.
    • one vehicle parking spot = 10-12 bikes
    • prove transit utility to local business (bikes mean business)
    • provides a utilitarian service to tourists around hubs like the convention center, cruise ship terminal, ballpark, etc. They help to get locals and visitors alike into the Gaslamp Quarter, Little Italy, East Village, Seaport Village, Harbor Island and Shelter Island. Good for restaurants, shops and sightseeing.
    • Same things could be argued for Coronado, beach towns or any other community.
    =======================
    The Little Italy Association is lobbying Civic San Diego, which oversees policies for the downtown area, to request a cease-and-desist action until the San Diego City Council can study the problem and approve a comprehensive set of regulations. In North County, Del Mar, Solana Beach and Encinitas have agreed to partner to create a regional bike share program. Carlsbad and Oceanside are expected to vote on the proposal.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2018
     
    The solution implemented will promote the use of automobiles over bike share.

    Instead of the sensible suggestions provided here.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2018
     
    I think the bike corrals will defeat the entire dockless purpose.

    What's happening now is the result of poor implementation, rampant capitalism, and human laziness/stupidity.

    I chalk it all up to growing pains and will gladly sidestep the occasional bike (f*ck scooters) if it means there are more helmetless people using bikes to get around.
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2018
     
    Paul Jameson (member of this forum) wrote a good post on the recent Bike Share Blowout:

    http://sdurban.com/?p=11057
  3.  

    People ride bicycles down the boardwalk in Mission Beach as a dockless electric-assist LimeBike stands idle.
    THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS

    THE WHEEL WORLD – Are dockless vehicles friend or foe?
    Victoria Davis March 21, 2018 sdnews.com
    Opinion is mixed regarding the surge of dockless vehicles. Is dockless an unjustifiable threat to rental shops? Or is this transportation trend the green alternative that will reduce traffic issues? Can both be true? Beach & Bay Press recently conducted an impromptu survey of small-business owners, locals and tourists, soliciting their views on dockless vehicles.
    The situation is ironic, claimed Jeff Russell, owner of Surf Monkey Bikes at 853 Grand Ave. Russell said he was “the first one to sound the alarm,” when Discover Bike (formerly DecoBike) moved its docked bike share stations onto Pacific Beach’s boardwalk. Those have since been removed due to public protest over their alleged unsightliness, and unfair competition with local business. “It’s funny in one way,” said Russell. “One of the Discover Bike owners came in here yesterday and wanted to know what I was going to do about dockless!
    Todd Gudat, owner of Pacific Beach Swings & Things at 4500 Ocean Blvd., took a dim view of dockless. “I don’t like them,” he said. “I don’t think it’s fair for us local businesses. I rent out bikes and skateboards, and I have to have a business license to sell them in front of my store. But anyone can park one of these [dockless] bikes next to mine. Honestly, I shouldn’t have to pay my business license this year,” Gudat said.
    (The dockless vehicle companies are required to have a business license.) “It’s affected my business by 40 to 60 percent,” Gudat said.
    Outside a tattoo parlor, Champ Grubbs, of PB/Clairemont, said, “I’m a little worried that I’m going to run one of ’em over. “They just kind of zip in and out of traffic off the sidewalk. Seems like a lot of people that are riding them don’t know what the hell they’re doing. I’ve almost hit a few people already, and I’ve seen a few people almost get hit,” Grubbs said.
    “If it takes cars off the road – I’m all in favor of it,” said Angela Skopniek of PB. “They’ll never be able to stop [dockless]. It’s just too easy. Too fun.”
    Joe and Deb Tombers, a mature couple visiting from Minneapolis, were open minded about dockless. “I like bicycles,” said Joe. “Wherever bikes are, to me, that’s good.” Deb was more concerned. “Walking on the boardwalk, between the bikes and scooters, it seems some of them are just going really too fast sometimes,” she said.
    San Diego Police Department spokesman Lt. Brent Williams says there are a myriad of state and city laws affecting the ability of dockless bike-sharing companies to operate as these do.

    “The City has sent a letter to each operator to ensure they are fully aware of those state and local regulations,” Williams said. “These are new businesses that have been operating in San Diego for less than a month. Our intent, is to help educate them and their customers about the rules and regulations around using these bicycles and scooters responsibly in our city.”

    “This issue is so new, there is no record of an enforcement effort by the police department, specifically against the companies that own these bikes,” Williams said. “Our enforcement would be against the rider in violation of the current local or state laws the department enforces.”


    Bird and Lime scooters parked in a beach accessway in Mission Beach last week.
    THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
  4.  
    LimeBike leaves sour taste with merchants
    March 21, 2018 lajollalight.com
    LimeBike canceled a much-anticipated presentation at the La Jolla Village Merchants Association meeting scheduled for Wednesday, March 14. Addressing business owners and members of the public gathered at the Riford Library for an in-person audience with the bike-sharing company, LJVMA executive director Sheila Fortune said: “LimeBike emailed me a couple of hours ago and canceled their presentation due to, quote, an emergency. So, don’t know what that means, don’t know why, but it was an emergency.”

    La Jolla residents and businesses have been up in arms about share bikes and scooters since they began rolling out in February. The dockless vehicles are frequently ditched in the middle of sidewalks and, sometimes, even streets with no responsibility accepted by the companies who rent them.
    Sally Miller of La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc. was bitterly disappointed at not being able to get her questions answered, so she fired them off at Fortune anyway.
    • “Only the people who own the bikes are benefiting financially?” Miller asked. (Yes, Fortune replied.)
    • “The City’s not getting anything for the clutter?” (No.)
    • “For giving up our sidewalks to these things, we’re not going to benefit in any way?” (No.)
    According to Fortune, LimeBike, ofo and several other bike- and scooter-sharing companies presented business plans to the City Attorney’s office and Development Services Department and were apparently told that all they needed was a business license.

    “No one ever consulted the communities, Economic Development, anyone else on what that means, what that looks like, or how it’s going to affect our public right-of-way,” Fortune said, adding: “No one is allowed on our public right-of-way without permits, and I give the permits, and they haven’t come to me.”
    For next month’s LJVMA meeting, Fortune said she would “try to have more representation from the other vendors.”

    When asked what emergency caused LimeBike to cancel its presentation, a spokesperson declined to answer the question and responded with an email reading: “Although we were not able to attend the last meeting, we’re looking forward to attending the next one.”
  5.  

    The pile of bikes was seen at the corner of Fifth and Market Street, Monday night, but one place bike sharing companies are not popular is the City of Coronado. Photo: News 8 via Danny Pillsbury

    City of Coronado declares dockless bikes a public nuisance
    Chris Gros Mar 21, 2018 cbs8.com
    The Coronado City Council on Tuesday night voted to declared the bikes a public nuisance, and starting Wednesday, the city will begin impounding dockless bikes left stationary on the island.

    The city declared the bikes a public nuisance after several were reported "abandoned" in awkward spots.

    "If people would park the yellow ones on a regular bicycle parking place, that's one thing, but they don't. They throw them on the ground. You have the green ones and the orange ones and it's basically litter," said a Coronado resident.
  6.  
    I love those assholes on Coronado.
  7.  

    A worker rides a shared bicycle past a huge pile of unused shared bikes in a vacant lot in Xiamen, Fujian province, China, on December 13, 2017.
    (Reuters)

    The Bike-Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles (slide show)
    Alan Taylor March 23, 2018 The Atlantic
    Last year, bike sharing took off in China, with dozens of bike-share companies quickly flooding city streets with millions of brightly colored rental bicycles. However, the rapid growth vastly outpaced immediate demand and overwhelmed Chinese cities, where infrastructure and regulations were not prepared to handle a sudden flood of millions of shared bicycles. Riders would park bikes anywhere, or just abandon them, resulting in bicycles piling up and blocking already-crowded streets and pathways. As cities impounded derelict bikes by the thousands, they moved quickly to cap growth and regulate the industry. Vast piles of impounded, abandoned, and broken bicycles have become a familiar sight in many big cities.

    Bike sharing remains very popular in China, and will likely continue to grow, just probably at a more sustainable rate. Meanwhile, we are left with these images of speculation gone wild—the piles of debris left behind after the bubble bursts.
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2018
     
    from an anecdotal perspective, just yesterday, a mere 5 weeks after the blitz / launch, I drove through north park only to see maybe 1 ofo every few blocks, then 1 lime a few blocks later. a far cry from those early weeks of 3-5 per brand on EVERY block ...

    the same in PB as well. i only saw maybe 10 bikes total in an entire mission blvd drive...

    maybe the vendors pulled way back because of the high visibility criticism...
  8.  

    Above: A row of dockless bike-sharing bicycles are parked on a sidewalk in downtown San Diego, March 23, 2018. Photo by Susana Tsutsumi

    How San Diego Is Responding To The Dockless Bike Craze
    Andrew Bowen, Brooke Ruth March 22, 2018 kpbs.org
    In the first two weeks of operation, the company had 21,000 new users and 55,000 rides which equated to 25,000 pounds of CO2 saved, Zack Bartlett, LimeBike's San Diego manager said.

    Bartlett joins Midday Edition on Thursday to discuss how its first month operating in San Diego has gone.
    Listen to the discussion...
  9.  

    Public Nuisance? Bike share backlash as cities say they've had enough
    Abbie Alford March 21, 2018 cbs8.com
    SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) – The debate over dockless bikes rolled into Pacific Beach as the Town Council held a panel Wednesday night with bike and scooter sharing companies: Bird, LimeBike, ofo and Mobike.
    “Bear with us if you can. We hope to bring value to your community and there is a learning curve,” said Zack Bartlett, LimeBike San Diego.

    A representative for the mayor’s office attended Wednesday night’s meeting and said he will share the community’s concerns with Mayor Faulconer. He will share efforts being made by dockless bikes and scooter companies to come up with ideas for regulations and what they are doing to better educate the public.
  10.  

    Photo by Kris Arciaga


    Little Italy Association Is Evicting Dockless Bike Sharing
    Andrew Bowen March 27, 2018 kpbs.org
    The Little Italy Association complained earlier this month that the explosion of "dockless" bike sharing in San Diego was creating a hazard for pedestrians, and that the city should temporarily ban the companies from operating. When officials declined, the business district took things into its own hands. Earlier this month, the Little Italy Association quietly began using its maintenance crews to pick up the shared bikes, remove them from the neighborhood's commercial core and place them side-by-side on a single sidewalk on the neighborhood's fringe.
    Marco Li Mandri, chief executive administrator of the Little Italy Association, said in an interview that the crews had been instructed to leave at least four feet of sidewalk clear when dropping the bikes off and that any blockage should not be happening. He said the conflict over the bikes could have been avoided if the companies had worked with the business association before their rollout.


    Dockless shared bikes crowd the sidewalk of State Street near the edge of Little Italy, March 23, 2018. Photo by Andrew Bowen
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2018
     
    Seems like Little Italy would greatly benefit from Bike Share.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCornelia
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2018
     
    The first LimeBike at Lake Murray - the bike has been sitting there like this for almost a week now, doesn't look like LimeBike is giving a darn about their inventory and picking up their abandoned bikes:



    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeMar 29th 2018
     
    Cornelia:The first LimeBike at Lake Murray - the bike has been sitting there like this for almost a week now, doesn't look like LimeBike is giving a darn about their inventory and picking up their abandoned bikes:





    Well, if they destroyed the GPS locator/lock like they did the rest of the bike, Limebike may not even know it is there. You could send them the info.

    What is wrong with people?
  11.  
    Scooter Company Bird Pledges To ‘Save’ Sidewalks From Vehicle Clutter
    City News Service March 28, 2018 kpbs.org
    As controversy continues around dockless bikes and other vehicles cluttering sidewalks in San Diego, scooter operator Bird is floating a code of conduct it hopes rivals will adopt to ease tensions over the emerging technology.

    Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden wrote an open letter to his counterparts at four bike sharing companies urging them to join him to "Save Our Sidewalks" by signing on to a three-pronged pledge that he says would help American cities avoid the plight of "out-of-control" bike sharing deployment in China. Huge piles of abandoned and broken bikes overrun the sidewalks in that country, he said. The plan unveiled Tuesday calls for repositioning bikes and scooters based on rider demand, limiting the number deployed to city streets and donating $1 per vehicle per day to cities in which the companies operate.
    Ofo, one of the main dockless bike-sharing companies in San Diego, said it would not join the pledge and derided Bird's proposal as motivated by self-interest. Ofo spokesman Taylor Bennett said Ofo is "actively" working with the Little Italy group to address its concerns. "We encourage Bird to join us in working together with local governments before launch and support cities' desire to have a framework for safety in place before new products are released to the public," Bennett said.
    Both companies have a track record of entering markets without official permission. The city of Santa Monica in December filed a criminal complaint against Bird, accusing it of operating without a license and refusing to comply with city citations, including orders to remove scooters from sidewalks. Ofo similarly dropped a fleet of its own yellow bikes on the UCSD campus last year without asking university officials for permission. The university kicked the bike sharing company off campus and has since signed a partnership with rival bike sharing company Spin.
    A spokesman for the San Diego mayor's office said the city has sent letters to each operator to ensure they're aware of the state and city laws that pertain to their businesses, including laws governing bikes, scooters, property and business activity in the public right-of-way and activity in public parks and beaches. "We appreciate the proactive approach the dockless bike-sharing companies are taking to address concerns raised by residents and businesses," said Greg Block, a spokesman for Mayor Kevin Faulconer.
    In his Tuesday letter, Bird's CEO said the company would pick up all of its scooters from city streets every night to inspect and repair vehicles as necessary and reposition the scooters "to where the vehicles are wanted the next day, so they are not cluttering our neighborhoods." The company also pledged that it will not increase the number of vehicles in any city unless they are being used on average at least three times per day and will remove any underutilized scooters. Additionally, VanderZanden offered to provide city governments $1 per scooter per day "so they can use this money to build more bike lanes, promote safe riding, and maintain our shared infrastructure."
  12.  
    ^^

    LimeBike and Ofo bicycles outside County Administration Center downtown. Photo by Chris Jennewein

    Scooter Renter Urges Dockless Bike Firms to Sign ‘Save Our Sidewalks’ Pledge
    Ken Stone March 28, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Dockless bikes proliferated in San Diego after the city attorney in February cleared the companies to operate in the city. The City Council has not considered any new rules regulating the businesses.
    Maya Rosas, policy director at transportation advocacy group Circulate San Diego, said proactive business practices, regulation and education are all important parts of ushering in the culture shift around using dockless bikes as transportation. “It’s great that Bird is taking a proactive approach toward making sure that these dockless bikes and scooters are a success wherever they go,” she said. “It’s also important for the city to create smart regulations that focus on encouraging the use of these active modes of transportation.”


    Bird scooters outside a building in downtown San Diego.
    VanderZanden urged his counterparts at LimeBike, Ofo, Mobike and Jump to sign onto the pledge, but so far none have done so, according to Bird. Asked about Bird’s pledge, a Mobike spokeswoman pointed to the Shared Mobility Principles for Livable Cities, which the company recently signed. She said the agreement states the company will prioritize people over vehicles, lower emissions and promote equity, among other goals, and is an example of how Mobike is dedicated to working with cities to improve transportation.

    –City News Service
  13.  

    A LimeBike sits parked near a sidewalk along El Cajon Boulevard in San Diego's City Heights neighborhood, April 2, 2018
    (Photo by Tarryn Mento)

    City Heights Embraces Dockless Bikes While Other Communities Fight Them
    Tarryn Mento April 4, 2018 kpbs.org
    Residents pushed years ago to bring bike-sharing to the community when the city first introduced rental stations, but the neighborhood ultimately didn't receive any locations. The recently approved station-less rides liberate users from picking up or returning rentals to a fixed location, yet are sparking debate across the region.
    Rodriguez said the bikes allow more people to explore the area outside a vehicle, but also provide an affordable transportation option to a community where the annual median income is about $33,000. That's compared to $64,000 for the city of San Diego, according to estimates from the 2016 American Community Survey. "We live in a (high) poverty area, which means that a lot of people can't afford paying a bus pass or getting to one place to another in a car or even just owning a bike," she said.
    Enrique Gandarilla, City Heights Business Association Executive Director, said he's noticed some dockless bike riders in the area and is open to more. "We're glad that there are more options for people in City Heights to travel and we definitely support bike-friendly business districts," Gandarilla said.

    Gandarilla said he heard from a few people that the rentals brought them to the neighborhood for the first time because the destination was too far to walk and a low availability of parking made it difficult to drive. "But because they've been able to sort of jump on one of these bikes and ride out here that they have, and they've been pleasantly surprised," he said.
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2018
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2018
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2018
     
  14.  
    La Jolla Parks & Beaches tackles dockless bikes, dangerous gap, reservoir project
    Ashley Mackin-Solomon April 4th, 2018 lajollalight.com
    Addressing the proliferation of dockless bikes in La Jolla and across San Diego, and noting their presence in public parks, LJP&B is figuring out the most efficient next step in addressing the issue. “This problem is bigger than La Jolla,” explained trustee Bill Robbins. “There are piles of these vehicles in Pacific Beach and Mission Beach. These companies are giants.”

    In addition to bikes being used and left in parks, LJP&B members said they couldn’t understand how these companies are allowed to operate without any local notice. Robbins said further, there is no enforcement for the existing bicycle laws, such as that riders must wear helmets, cannot ride on the sidewalk, must be 16 years old, etc.
    “Part of the problem is no matter what rules we or the City put together, just like the short-term rental issue, there are not enough code enforcement officers. The City is going to have to come up with a plan,” he said. The board will reconsider the issue 4 p.m. Monday, April 23 at the Rec Center.

    La Jolla Shores board elects new members, talks dockless bikes
    Ashley Mackin-Solomon April 4th, 2018 lajollalight.com
    Joining the list of San Diego communities concerned with the explosive proliferation of dockless bikes around town, the LJSA board decided to write a letter to submit to the City voicing its concerns. LimeBike, ofo, Mobike and electronic scooter company Bird, encourage riders to leave their vehicles wherever it’s convenient when their ride is complete and vehicles are available on demand for the next user.
    “We are finding these vehicles in the business district parked in front of other businesses that pay rent and taxes. They are literally under our awnings,” Kraszewski said. “I’ve spoken to some of our elderly neighbors who cannot get around them in wheelchairs and with walkers. Residents are overwhelmingly against them.” She added that in attending other meetings on the subject, she observed that those who leave the bikes where they shouldn’t get a “mark” on their record and are charged more the next time they rent one, so the company benefits from people misplacing them.
    Citing the users who illegally ride on the sidewalk and without helmets, trustee Coco Tihanyi opined: “The City’s Code Compliance department is so strict when it comes to businesses and residents; if you violate the rules, they come and talk to you. I can’t believe with this business, people can do whatever they want without consequences.” Kraszewski warned: “These companies are just starting to roll them out, this is just the beginning. This is nothing compared to what we are going to see this summer in the beach areas.”
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2018 edited
     
    Sigurd:auto wreck

    Sigurd,
    I don’t think that the wrecking yard photo is a fair comparison to the piles of dockless bikes pics that are popping up on the internet.
    The wrecking yard photo is a grim reminder of the thousands of people killed or maimed before the autos arrived at the wrecking yard.
    In contrast, no lives were lost and probably no one was injured too severely constructing the piles of dockless bikes as the pics merely represent a few very bored NIMBY vandals creating a rather dubious photo op.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    LimeBike: How it works
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018 edited
     
    We CAN do this, San Diego.
    null
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    Remember when Discover bought Decobike a month before the dockless craze and nobody rides them anymore? :/
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    t.e.d:Remember when Discover bought Decobike a month before the dockless craze and nobody rides them anymore? :/


    i do think Discover is the big loser here ... kind of like when Murdock bought MySpace months before facebook really took over.
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    from anecdotal it sure seems like the players / bikes on the streets / all the action is with LimeBike and Ofo ... MoBike seems to be a distant 3rd in both visibility, activity, and presence. am i wrong?
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    From ofo mailing list ...

    "Thanks to you, we've collectively pedaled our way to ONE MILLION rides in just the first three months of 2018!

    From Dallas to DC, Miami to Seattle, together we've unlocked bike sharing in more than 25 cities across the US, and we aim to serve many more by the end of the year. Your rides have helped improve urban life and strengthen cities across the country by easing traffic congestion, reducing carbon emissions and supporting affordable new options to fill transportation gaps.
    Here’s to the road ahead -
    please enjoy five free ofo rides, on us.
    (To access your free ofo rides, open the ofo app and click on 'My Coupons' in your Wallet)
    - Happy Riding! Team ofo


    (5) ride coupons. Each ride coupon is valid in the US for (1) free ride up to 60 minutes. Regular rates apply after 60 minutes. Promo valid until 11:59pm on April 17, 2018. Coupons are automatically applied. Subject to ofo Terms and Conditions.



    here's a quick ofo tip:
    Be sure to only operate ofo bicycles within the San Diego city limits.
    Please do not ride bikes into Coronado, El Cajon, Mexico or other areas outside
    ofo’s coverage zone. You can view our coverage zone in the ofo app. "
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018 edited
     
    Rode the LA beach paths, Santa Monica to Marina Del Rey and around Venice as well.

    The dockless bikes and e-scooters are everywhere. It was a huge change from the last time I rode here (two years ago).
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    gottobike:
    Sigurd:auto wreck

    Sigurd,
    I don’t think that the wrecking yard photo is a fair comparison to the piles of dockless bikes pics that are popping up on the internet.
    The wrecking yard photo is a grim reminder of the thousands of people killed or maimed before the autos arrived at the wrecking yard.
    In contrast, no lives were lost and probably no one was injured too severely constructing the piles of dockless bikes as the pics merely represent a few very bored NIMBY vandals creating a rather dubious photo op.
    I didn't make myself clear enough: There are photos posted by the NIMBY-ists all over the internet of retired bike share bikes piled up in storage yards (presumably, in China), presented as a grim reminder of the "failure" of bike share. The car wrecking yard picture was meant as a reminder that the exact same thing is happening with cars (but never used by the same NIMBY-ists as a sign of the the failure of the "car system".


    For the record, I am the biggest supporter there is of bike share, and believe that the problems some see can be overcome, or if not, that the benefits from bike share exceed the cost by a large margin.

  15.  

    Ofo bikes parked in Uptown (Photo by Sara Butler)

    Uptown News Briefs: BIKE MOB HITS THE STREETS
    April 6th, 2018 sduptownnews.com
    Upwards of 30 Uptown residents rode dockless bikes down El Cajon Boulevard on Saturday, March 31, for the Dock Your Bike Down The Boulevard-Bike Share Mob event, which was held by the El Cajon Boulevard Business Improvement Association (BIA).

    “We had a bunch of riders, including some virgin riders, which was great,” Tootie Thomas, president of the BIA and owner of LIPS, said. “We put up a poll on our Facebook event page and saw a few people had never taken them [dockless bikes] [out] before. “And that’s where we really saw the change happening,” Thomas continued. “Where someone like myself four years ago never rode a bike on the boulevard to go from business to business and realize that four blocks was easy to do, then six blocks. After that, I might buy my own bike and start going from business to business on the boulevard that way.”

    “Will we be doing it next year? Well, I think we will be doing it again next week,” he said. “We’re not gonna stop here, we’re really enthused by this.”
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2018
     
    I looked and didn't see this March 30, 2018 SD Reader article posted yet ...

    https://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2018/mar/30/stringers-wild-west-back-san-diego/#

    The wild west is back in San Diego

    Limebike hogs show, but it is Ofo bikes that are stolen
    By Eric Bartl, March 30, 2018

    Sunday afternoon in El Cajon I unsuccessfully tried to find an ofo dockless rental bike to help me get around town. I traveled to five locations where the ofo app listed an available bike, but in each location no bicycle was in sight.

    The five bikes showed up on the app within a two square mile area in central El Cajon. First I traveled to Ballard St. at Decker St., where a bike was shown somewhere inside the El Cajon Mobile Home Park. I walked up to the exact location to find the ofo icon in the app hovering right in the middle of one of the mobile homes. No bicycle was in view outside.

    During the prior week I had the same experience with ofo in Lemon Grove, Spring Valley and La Mesa. In East County people are stealing away dockless bikes and stashing them inside their homes and garages. Ofo seems to be the thief’s bike of choice.

    While downtown San Diego and other central neighborhoods have a problem with too many bikes crowding public areas, East County has a problem with the public being deprived of the bikes that make their way out here. In response to an inquiry ofo stated, “NEVER park ofo bikes inside a residence.”

    After my first failed attempt to get an ofo in El Cajon I tried to find a Limebike. There was only one available Limebike listed nearby and I was able to retrieve it. I haven’t personally found any cases of stolen Limebikes yet. I decided to use the Limebike to investigate whether any of the remaining four ofos in the area were actually available to the public.

    My next stop was Madison Avenue, a block east of 2nd St., next to the Sahara Mobile Lodge. This time the app was showing the ofo icon hovering between the sidewalk and street, not inside a home. But still no bicycle was in sight. Then I noticed a sewer cap directly in front of me on the street. Several feet away in the other direction, on the other side of a chain link fence, I could see a stormwater drain running underground toward the street. If the bike could not be seen above ground where it was located, it must have been underground. Someone stashed an ofo bike inside an underground tunnel.

    I continued to the next three stops. I went to an apartment building on Madison Avenue adjacent to Wells Park on its western boundary. I went to another apartment on Beech Street at the corner of Graves Avenue. My final stop was an apartment on Park Avenue a block west of Magnolia Avenue. In each case the ofo bike was stashed away inside the building. After five tries I gave up trying to see if there were any ofos in El Cajon that were not stolen.

    In case you are wondering if the incidents I had with ofo were simply glitches on their app, at one apartment complex a resident who was outside confirmed to me that he did have an ofo bike inside his apartment.

    Ofo also has a problem with damaged bikes. I had to make damage reports on the majority of ofo bikes I was able to retrieve the week before in other areas. Damage included missing brake cables, missing kickstands, bent handlebars, and warped wheels. One bike looked as if it were run over by a truck.

    I couldn’t help but notice a news report just before publication of this story in which ofo states they are not aware of any reports of their San Diego bicycles having cut brake cables. I reported a missing brake cable to them several days ago.

    My guess as to the reason ofo is having more problems than Limebike is because they offered use of their bikes for free during the month of March. It’s obvious more ofos have made their way to East County than Limebikes. It does not appear that any Mobikes have made their way east. I still haven’t seen Spin anywhere in San Diego. Perhaps they haven’t expanded beyond UCSD.

    Even in downtown San Diego, there is a striking contrast between the misuse of ofo compared to Limebike. I saw several ofos commandeered by people strapping their belongings to them or using them as clothes hangers, tentpoles, etc.. I didn’t happen to see any commandeered Limebikes downtown.

    It’s not only the relatively better odds of avoiding a wasted trip to find a Limebike in East County that makes it shine compared to ofo. Their electric assist bicycle is what steals the show. One of the Limebikes I rode was a Lime-E. The benefit of having that electric-powered boost is huge in a city full of hills.

    To many, the arrival of dockless bikes are an unwelcome change. The City of Coronado recently stated they will begin impounding them. For homeless people who need a clothes hanger, carless people who need easy-to-reach readily available transportation, or people who just like that element of chaos, they are a welcome change.
  16.  

    LimeBike needs people with big cars to help collect, charge, and reposition their bicycles and scooters.

    The color of LimeBike's money
    Rental bike company needs you and your car
    Matt Potter, April 4, 2018 sandiegoreader.com
    San Mateo’s LimeBike, one of a host of controversial free-standing bike and scooter rental services to enter San Diego’s frenzied sidewalk transportation market, has retained the lobbying firm of Rath Miller LLC to help juice its way through the regulatory perils of city hall. Now the company is advertising for freelancers to “collect and juice Lime-S scooters.”

    Explains the online posting for the position of Juicer, “Bring them back to your charging spot using your own vehicle. We love pickups, vans, SUVs, and full-sized sedans!” Then, “Charge them overnight! Use our Lime-S power supplies with any standard electrical outlet in your home.” Finally, “Deploy fully charged Lime-S scooters in the morning. We’ll tell you where the drop-off will be for your Lime-S, bright and early for the commuting crowd!”

    Though banned from Coronado, the scooters and bikes are so far enjoying an absence of regulation in San Diego, where Rath Miller principals Kimberly Hale Miller and Phil Rath have come up with plenty of political juice, otherwise known as campaign money, for David Alvarez and his Democratic council colleague Myrtle Cole, along with mayor Kevin Faulconer, city attorney Mara Elliott, and council members Chris Cate, Scott Sherman, Barbara Bry, and Chris Ward.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2018
     
    I still LOVE the idea of paying folks to pedal the ShareBikes to new locations.

    It makes sense, it's efficient and will cost the companies less in the long run.

    How do we make this happen?
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2018
     
    bikingbill:I still LOVE the idea of paying folks to pedal the ShareBikes to new locations.

    It makes sense, it's efficient and will cost the companies less in the long run.

    How do we make this happen?


    I also like the idea of a tiered pricing system for different areas, or a "free ride" from a less used area to a more-used area. I think paying folks for relocation is a long-shot.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2018 edited
     
    bikingbill:I still LOVE the idea of paying folks to pedal the ShareBikes to new locations. It makes sense, it's efficient and will cost the companies less in the long run. How do we make this happen?

    Your idea already happened - rent a "bonus bike" (marked with a lime slice inside a money bag) for more than five minutes and get a $1.00 credit towards your next rental - see below:


    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2018 edited
     
    Sigurd:
    bikingbill:I still LOVE the idea of paying folks to pedal the ShareBikes to new locations. It makes sense, it's efficient and will cost the companies less in the long run. How do we make this happen?

    Your idea already happened - rent a "bonus bike" (marked with a lime slice inside a money bag) for more than five minutes and get a $1.00 credit towards your next rental - see below:




    Yes, SPIN bikes does it too. I've seen the free ride icon for bikes that were left off campus and needed to be ridden back.

    Btw. the warning when riding them off campus also works quite well. I took one for a quick grocery run to the Trader Joes plaza and the moment I locked it there I got a text message and an email that this was outside the allowed area and that I should return the bike asap. I did ride it bacl, of course, so I don't know if it actually has consequences it you don't. I believe the fineprint says one could get charged.
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2018
     
    Similar / more content from Sara Butler from the UpTown News article linked above, but more overall content for the SD Downtown News version

    https://sandiegodowntownnews.com/dockless-bikes-hit-downtown/

    Dockless bikes hit Downtown
    Posted: April 6th, 2018
    Sara Butler | Contributing Editor
  17.  

    A row of dockless bicycles are parked at San Diego State University, April 10, 2018.
    Photo by Laura McVicker

    San Diego State Partners With Ofo To Offer Dockless Bike Rentals
    KPBS News April 10, 2018 kpbs.org
    San Diego State University hosted its first-ever Bike to Campus Day to launch a partnership between the university and dockless bike rental provider Ofo. About 100 dockless bikes will be available on campus to students, staff and faculty. Additionally, the company will offer a month of free rides for participants with an SDSU email using the promo code "sdsulaunch. University officials said the bikes help the university "progress towards its Climate Action Plan goals set forth in 2017.""
    Austin Marshburn, head of Ofo for Universities, said there’s already been a lot of interest in the bikes, as 300 people tried them out this morning. “Campuses are really what dockless bikes are for,” he said. Marshburn said riders will be encouraged to turn in the bikes at 30 designated racks spread over the campus to avoid them being left in random spots.
    Charlotte Roberts, an SDSU sophomore who helped get Ofo bikes to the university through her work with Associated Students, feels San Diego State’s campus is especially conducive to biking. “I think we need to get people more comfortable with riding bikes,” she said. “There’s a lot of surface area to cover. It makes your time more efficient here.”
  18.  
    Uber buys Jump Bikes and enters the electric bike sharing business
    Washington Post April 09, 2018 latimes.com
    Ride-hailing giant Uber is buying the electric-bike startup Jump Bikes, adding bike sharing to its transportation options. Uber Chief Executive Dara Khosrowshahi announced Monday that his company had reached a deal to acquire Jump, which operates dockless bike-sharing services in San Francisco and the District of Columbia.

    "We're committed to bringing together multiple modes of transportation within the Uber app — so that you can choose the fastest or most affordable way to get where you're going, whether that's in an Uber, on a bike, on the subway, or more," Khosrowshahi said in a blog post.
    Both Uber and Jump say the goal is to offer multiple modes of transportation within the Uber app, to give users options to fast and affordable transportation and make it easier to live without owning a car. "We're excited to begin our next chapter and to play a significant part in the transition of Uber to a multi-modal platform," Jump Bikes founder and Chief Executive Ryan Rzepecki said in blog post Monday. "Joining Uber presents us with the opportunity to realize our dreams faster and at a much larger scale."
    In Washington, Jump is one of five dockless bike operators. It has deployed about 200 bicycles in the city and has become one of the most popular bike services, with each bike averaging 3.5 trips daily and 11 miles per day, according to a company spokeswoman.

    The bikes feature an electric motor in the front wheel and a battery concealed in the frame. Unlike other dockless systems, which can be left wherever there's sidewalk space, Jump bikes must be locked to a bike rack with an integrated U-lock that is held magnetically to the frame. It costs $2 for 30 minutes of ride time.
    • CommentAuthorT
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2018
     
    Neon Red bikes! we're getting some serious colors!
  19.  
    Town Council to hold dockless-bikes forum Thursday, April 12, 2018
    La Jolla Town Council’s April 12 meeting will include a special session on bike-sharing apps.

    “My purpose isn’t to have them talk about their service,” said Town Council president Ann Kerr Bache, who will moderate. “It’s for them to answer questions. The real issue is how do we fix the dockless bike problem, because everybody agrees there is a problem, and it’s really a problem for people who use walkers and canes.”

    Among the scheduled participants are representatives of the bike-sharing company ofo and the scooter company Bird San Diego. “I know it’s a very emotional topic, but we’re really trying to treat it in terms of how do we make the business model work,” Bache said, “but not with this craziness of letting them lean the bikes against shrubs and stuff.”

    La Jolla Town Council will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 12, 2018 at the Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. La Jolla, CA
  20.  


    Are dockless bikes good business?
    Phillip Molnar April 15, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    Question: Can dockless bikes and scooters stay in business long-term?
    Answers in article: YES 12 ---- NO 2