Not signed in (Sign In)
    • CommentAuthorfatwhat?
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2013 edited
     
    So I've got the bike and the bags....but that stock seat has got to go. The guys at Cal Coast bikes recommend a brooks saddle. But why or what else is out there? Should I get the one with springs or why wouldn't you? When I was younger a seat just existed but now that I'm 30...a little comfort might be worth spending a little money on.

    Some particulars I 6' male and weigh about 230 (goal is back down below 200). Average ride is 10-30 miles with longer rides to come. I have a Surly LHT
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2013 edited
     
    The WTB SST spec'ed on most Surly complete bikes is one of the best cheap seats available. Brooks are great long lasting leather saddles and I've run the Brooks Professional on a couple of bikes. I haven't ridden a spring suspension saddle for so many years I can't remember what I didn't like about them but I have run suspension seatposts that I really liked. Recently tested a Selle Anatomical leather saddle and have come to prefer this over the Brooks. The only issue I've found with the Selle Anatomica is the rails are longer than what the structure of the saddle can accommodate. Placing saddle too far forward or back will allow saddle to tilt radically after a few miles but it is easy enough to fix. Both Specialized and Bontrager have new designs that are very comfortable and are based on measurements. If you believe you need a saddle that is wider or narrower than the average, this might be a good way to go. My sport road and MTB favorite is Fizik but they do not seem to be very durable.
    There are lots of very good brands but the fit is the key. Whatever you choose, make sure the saddle comes with a fit guarantee so you can get a replacement if it doesn't work out.

    ADDENDUM
    The reason I chose the Brooks Professional over the spring suspension B17 is because I utilize 3 different saddle positions, including "on the rivet", that were better accommodated by the Professional.
  1.  
    Brooks Saddle - User Reviews and Comments
    Good thread with lots of information and opinions.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2013 edited
     
    The correct saddle is the one that feels good on you. There is no advice from others that can work. Find a shop that can demo and ride distance. One man's plush silk pillow is another's taint hatchet - hence the wide variety available. I do centuries on an S-Works Romin with no padding, the shape works for me but it might sterilize someone else. Cal Coast will sell you what they have in stock or order you something based on speculation - that's all they can do. There are other shops in town who have multiple demo saddles - find one of those.

    Even after finding the first one that seems right, it will eventually be time to try something else. If you go to a Specialized dealer, they will sit you on a pad and make a recommendation based on their science. Beyond that, this thread should die a quick death.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2013
     
    I, too, do longer rides -- including centuries -- in unpadded shorts, and my saddle of choice is a Brooks (in my case, the B17 and B17N). I also use Brooks on other bikes, including those with a more upright position such as my mountain and "townie" bikes.

    However, pay no attention to what anybody recommends - it is that subjective!

    One thing that is easy to forget, however, is that your sit bones and surrounding areas (AKA "butt") need to get used to increased cycling distances and frequencies, just like the rest of your body. As you build up your riding amount, your butt is likely to tell you when it has had enough with soreness - regardless of how "perfect" your choice of saddle may be.

    So - after, say, 6 months / 50 rides / 500 miles, your behind should be pretty adapted to your saddle: So do not complain about the saddle before you've trained your butt - in the mean time, go gradual, and above all, HTFU. :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2013
     
    ^ agree and before it dies my requested death - "“I don't see what my arse has to do with enchantings!” - Cervantes, Don Quixote
    •  
      CommentAuthorGeoff
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2013
     
    I run three different versions of Brooks - B17 on the commuter, B68 on the Brompton, and Flyer on my touring. I love all of them, but I think it's also a matter of fidgeting with position until it feels right, and the miles dedicated to breaking in the leather and my rear-end to heavy mileage. My wife has ridden a Flyer S and the B68 on the Brompton, and still prefers the stock cheap padded sprung seat on her beach cruiser. You can't argue with how something feels.
    • CommentAuthorfatwhat?
    • CommentTimeSep 6th 2013
     
    Thanks for the advice guys. ..down horse down...sleeeeppppping...ok no more dead horse thread
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 29th 2015