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  1.  
    I am planning on an epic ride from Canada to Mexico, probably over the Pacific trail. I hope to be sponsored by #beablackburnranger2016. I have a video application for that! Wondering who can give me some information about routes sections that were successful to you. Will be camping out a lot, so need to stay warm and stay safe. My ride is to advocate for cycling, so we will be filming some of the people we meet along the way. I would also appreciate your support with a click on the video and your ideas about how tough these routes are from Canada to Mexico. https://youtu.be/ha1_CkCPd9g
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      CommentAuthorPaul
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2016
     
    If you are talking about road, the Bicycling the Pacific Coast book is all you need. I found it more useful than the ACA maps. In general, it's pretty flat all the way down if you ride the coast. If you are talking about riding the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) - you can't. There is a somewhat parallel Pacific Crest Bicycle Trail that the ACA has incorporated in the Sierra Cascade maps.
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2016
     
    My wife and I have toured the entire coast from Canada to Mexico hugging the coastline as much as possible. We started at the border in Blaine, WA after crossing over the border ditch and briefly entering White Rock, British Columbia (can't do that anymore since 1999). We rode down to Edison, WA then crossed over to the ferry landings and spent some time exploring the San Juan Islands before heading west to Sequim and the Makah Reservation on Cape Flattery. Made it down to Long Beach, WA and then over the Columbia River to Astoria, OR. Down the wild Oregon Coast to Cape Blanco, the windiest place in North America. Brookings, OR was our last stop before entering California at Smith River. Rode through Avenue of the Giants in Humboldt County and then entered Mendocino County after the long hot climb up Leggett Pass (Several years later we returned to McKinleyville and rode the Lost Coast from Ferndale to Petrolia and Honeydew, then mounted the knobbies and rode the dirt road through the Moondust section to a deserted beach camp at Usal Beach). Camped on the beach in Westport, then made our way south to Fort Bragg. We ended up in San Francisco after camping at deserted Point Reyes Seashore where militant raccoons stole our food before we could lock it up in the bear lockers.

    We have done San Francisco to San Diego numerous times, most recently in 2005 on a tandem MTB fitted for touring.

    I'm intrigued by the video showing what appears to be miles of paved singletrack. What is the "Pacific Trail?" How far does it reach and is it closed to motor traffic? We generally tried to stay as close to the coast as possible, unaware of any traffic free alternative routes. We are growing restless in our advancing age and want to plan another tour soon.
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    Also check out warmshowers.org - providing shelter for touring cyclists.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2016
     
    Schwinn, I think the paved trail is in Colorado, since BicycleAdventurer is from CO and talks about riding around Breckenridge. I like the KT Tunstall cover by the young woman with the guitar, Alex Mabey.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2016
     
    That sounds like a great adventure!
    I've found Adventure Cycling Association a fantastic resource. They update their maps and route profiles very aggressively and have an active network with local ambassadors and near real-time updates. If traveling the Pacific Coast, construction zones can turn an otherwise nice skinny tired tour into a bit of an off road adventure. As much of the Pacific Coast route follows PCH, it is easy to miss some of the more complex and sometimes more interesting routings. I found riding early avoided the winds that often come up in the afternoon and also avoided much of the motor vehicle congestion. Big Sur south of Monterey was always my favorite; however, the route getting from Santa Cruz to Monterey is confusing at best, especially as the bike route signage marking some of the critical turns is consistently disappeared.