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    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2009 edited
     
    Good morning everyone,

    Need thoughts/suggestions on what happened this morning.

    Riding to work on El Prado which is my second favorite section because I can actually keep up with the speed limit of 15mph, when a truck/suv appears behind me and starts honking repeatedly before buzzing me. I was mad so I took down the license plate number and make/model of the auto. Husband rode up to him and kept yelling that the speed limit was 15 mph. The guy finally gets out and yells about bicyclists shouldn't be on the road and what not. He finally backs down and drives away when he realizes (after being told repeatedly) that he was speeding.

    I want to call and report the driver but not sure how to do that. What should I say? That he was speeding, honked at us and then buzzed us (instead of passing us in the opposing lane which was empty)?

    We're not hurt, just a bit angry. You know the whole thing about us having equal rights on the road and so on.

    ---

    Edit: This is not the first time this type of thing has happened to either of us (husband has gotten hit by car and then laughed at by cop in Philly when he reported the incident). I just want to start doing something about this instead of just taking it)
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2009
     
    Call 911 if a driver gets out of a vehicle to confront you. Call SDPD at 531-2000 with license plate, description of driver and vehicle otherwise. There are lots of San Diego cops who ride bikes, even a couple or three who race. If you are lucky, one of these good guys will respond. The ones I know take a dim view of shenanigans like this; San Diego isn't like Philly or other big cities in this regard. Take a picture of the driver/vehicle and post it on forums for all to see. Most aggressive drivers will flee when they see you with a cell phone. If you feel up to it, apply some sort of frontier justice, but not at the expense of your safety.

    On the other hand I was almost knocked down on Monday morning crossing El Cajon Blvd. at Utah St. by a large simian talking on a cell phone who turned left into me without signaling. He was in such a hurry that when I shouted at him to get off the phone, pay attention, and signal his turn, he whipped a flying U-turn in the instersection and came after me in his new black Chrysler 300 with blacked-out windows (illegal), shiny wheels, and gold trim (these Neanderthals love shiny objects). I led him on a merry chase for maybe five or six minutes through North Park before I was able to lose him in traffic, no cops anywhere to be seen. I didn't have time to haul out my cell phone. Lesson: sometimes it's best not to say anything to drivers who menace you. Chances are if you ignore them, they will not step over the line to commit vehicular assault.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2009
     
    Wow, Sam, sorry to hear about that, and ray333, too. It's tempting to construe cases like this as "drivers vs. bicycles", but really we're talking about idiots versus common sense (and the law). Think about how the vast majority of drivers don't pull sh*t like this. If you've got a driver yelling at you, chasing you (my god), or whatever, that's a pretty good sign you're dealing with an already-unstable individual who will escalate the conflict very quickly. The best thing to do is to stay calm (which doesn't mean you can't raise your voice), call the police (emergency or non-emergency as the case may dictate), and don't provoke this crazy person any further. Of course, all of that is hard when your adrenaline is going, and you're being threatened.
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2009
     
    ray333:Call 911 if a driver gets out of a vehicle to confront you. Call SDPD at 531-2000 with license plate, description of driver and vehicle otherwise.
    In cases like this, does anyone know the rules for under what circumstances it is permissible to call 911 and when the low-priority SDPD number suffices? In terms of response, 911 is of course much more efficient than the regular SDPD switchboard, so it would be nice to know exactly under what circumstances 911is allowed.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2009
     
    I didn't know about the non-emergency number. I've poked around the SD PD site and read up on the CA bicycle law to figure out what I could do. Overall, I wasn't too upset this morning (okay I was annoyed), but rather than my previous attitude of letting things go, I thought it would be a good habit to constantly report bad drivers (maybe fining them will balance the City's budget - it's my little suggestion to ease the financial woes of this great city).

    As for photo taking, I have some ancient cell phone with no photo taking capability and I always forget to carry it around. I generally don't have the presence of mind to take pictures of people.

    I had Fred call the PD and the rep told him that we have to call at the time of the incident from the incident site immediately. I guess I now know what to do.

    P.S. Every day I count my blessings that the MTS drivers don't yell at me but instead wait until they can pass me safely on Park Blvd. Philly's SEPTA drivers have a special place in bicyclists' hell.
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2009 edited
     
    Bus drivers are pretty bad here as well. If they pull stupid stuff like squeezing you into parked cars or running red lights, get the vehicle number, route number, description of the driver and call San Diego Transit at 238-0100. I've gotten to know some of the office reps over the years, one of whom is an avid cyclist. Once a few years ago riding west on University past Eighth Ave. in Hillcrest a bus driver refused to respect my right to take the lane. As he passed me with an open lane to the left, he began moving me over into parked cars. I banged on the side of the bus with my fist, and to the horror and shouts of passengers on the right side almost hit parked cars on my right. Had I gone down here, I might well have fallen under the right rear wheel of the bus. I caught up with the bus when it turned right on Fifth Ave., pulled up next to the driver and took a photo. When I told him I was going to report him to his employer, he scoffed and then tried to rub me out three more times on Washington St., passengers yelling at him to leave me alone. I followed up with an immediate call, then called again every day for a week. I sure hope he got his arse fired, but they are union employees and almost impossible to get rid of. They know it, too.

    Two years ago Jolie and I were riding the tandem south on 30th St. As we passed Meade Ave. heading toward University, we passed a bus stopped picking up passengers. As we passed, the driver pulled out from the curb without signalling and began moving us over into oncoming traffic. Pedestrians on the other side of the street yelled "STOP! STOP!" and Jolie screamed. We pulled up next to the left side of the bus at University and I had some choice words for the driver, who responded with "YO MAMA!" (not the cellist). Several months later I was riding the motorcycle home from the velodrome, going north on Utah St. Approaching University at the KFC the signal changed to green as I was about 200 meters to the south of the intersection. I throttled back up to 25 mph and just as I entered the intersection a bus westbound on University ran the red light directly in front of me. I locked up the rear wheel and managed to miss hitting the side of the bus, keeping the moto upright, but killing the motor. When I restarted it, I turned left on University and caught up with the bus. I clocked it at 40 mph before I caught it at the signal at Texas St. I honked the horn at the driver to open the window and talk to me. The driver was the same woman who had nearly knocked us down on the tandem months before! She said nothing when I asked her why she ran the red light in front of me, just gave me the middle finger salute. I said, "oh, I'm number one?" Some passengers laughed and I drove home to start the reporting process again. I haven't seen her again since.

    Don't let these union-entitled room-temperature IQs get away with endangering your life with heavy equipment.
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      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2009
     
    I was run off the road by a bus heading North on Park Blvd, just before University. I'd been playing leap-frog with the bus all the way up the hill from downtown, which for some reason the bus drivers take real offense at. So he finally got next to me and then pulled over to a bus stop with me along side. I had to jump the curb, dodge a tree and narrowly avoided taking out two pedestrians. I was scared off my a**, and didn't think to get his bus number, or report it. I will next time.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2009
     
    @ray333: a bus on that route almost t-boned me in the car by running the light at Utah/University. I've had several other close calls with buses on University in the car, too, and seen a lot of almost-accidents between buses and cyclists. That's one reason I choose not to ride on University if I can help it. On principle, it's wrong to be frightened away from riding on any public roadway, but principles don't do much good if you're flattened by a bus. Fair warning to others who might ride University--keep an eye on those f*ckers!
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      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2009
     
    .

    I'm at work this morning, and digging up old posts seems like a good way to spend my time.
    I've been thinking a lot lately about the "rules of the road" and cyclists. I guess I'd like to see a discussion about how we as cyclists should adhere to the vehicle code. I think it's pretty clear that the majority of cyclists do not come to a complete stop at every stop sign, so we're pretty much breaking laws from the start. But do most of us go further than that?
    This isn't an effort to pass judgment on any particular style or habit or practice. I'm just interested in what people think/do. I think that there is clearly a perception in the non-cycling population that bicycle riders are "dangerous" and "run red lights" and "dart in and out from between cars." Is that all of us? Or just some kids on BMX bikes? Or when I don't come to a complete stop when turning right at an empty intersection am I pissing off some motorists?
    Personally, I tend to roll through stop signs, and am fairly liberal with my lane usage. But I have tried really hard lately to not run stop lights (maybe a $180 dollar ticket convinced me it wasn't a good idea, maybe I don't want to be a bad example to motorists). Where does your personal line lie? How do you justify it?
    Just something I'm interested in; respond if you care to. Again, not looking to start a finger pointing arguement, just looking for a discussion. . .
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2009
     
    A few days ago, I was at Zoo Drive (turning left onto Park Blvd) behind a few cars waiting for the light to give us the green on turning left. Another bicyclist rode past a few cars and reached me and said something like, "well it looks like you're obeying the laws so I'll join you." I wasn't sure what to say, so I said "thank you.". He was a middle aged guy and was surprised that he wouldn't follow the rules of the road...

    I used to not come to a complete stop especially when I have a hill to look forward to afterward, but now I make it a point to stop by putting one foot down (a visual for car drivers looking at me) and refuse to go if it's not my turn (I refuse to make eye contact). Car drivers seem to appreciate it. I also use my hands a lot to indicate when riding and wave thanks to car drivers when they yield (especially when they go into the other lane to pass me on single lanes). My goal is to indicate to car drivers that if a bicyclist is wearing a helmet with lights and using hands to signal, you can trust that they know how to behave on the road (guarantee no surprises). I feel that since I've been riding that way (for the last 5 years or so), my negative interactions on the road have gone down drastically.
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      CommentAuthortawnya
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2009
     
    I'll admit, if it's totally clear, I'll only pause at a stop sign. Other than that, I refuse to run a red light. If worse comes to worst, I will walk my bike as a pedestrian in the crosswalk when I can't trip the light. I act as an ambassador for cyclists. I react calmly to angry drivers (no shouting or cursing back!) and act the same as if I was driving. The only times I turn pedestrian when riding are when something is far too dangerous for me - like turning left onto Washington from the southbound where the left lane can turn or go straight onto I-5. I also do what Sam does and acknowledge any driver who gives me leeway. Smiling and waving seem to help ease a lot of tension.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2011 edited
     
    From the Law Office of Mark Blane: Liability When Potholes Cause Bike Accidents in San Diego

    Street potholes can cause serious bike accidents in San Diego, and under some conditions, the public or government entity responsible for maintaining city roads can be held liable for injuries and damages. If you've been injured in a bike accident caused by a pothole, meet with a San Diego, California, bicycle accident firm who can help you pursue an injury claim.

    How Potholes Cause Your Bike Accident in San Diego

    Long-term use causes wear and tear, leading to surface cracks which can expand if not repaired; and
    Low quality temporary road fixes can sink or break in a short amount of time if not permanently repaired.

    If temporary work caused the pothole, the public entity responsible for performing roadwork on the road or area, in which you were injured, may be responsible if it didn't provide an obvious warning about the dangerous potholes.

    If the pothole has developed from wear and tear, the liability of the damages comes down to how long the pothole has been present. If it was relatively new, the entity responsible for road work may not be held liable. If the pothole had existed for some time - weeks or months - then the government is much more likely to be held responsible, particularly if other accidents have occurred at the site.


    --

    I found this website while searching for something else and besides the garish webdesign, found the site full of interesting info.
  1.  
    Mark Blane just helped my roommate out with a case involving bicycle-automobile accident... he's on top of it, does good work/knows his stuff.

    I only mention it 'cause I would have loved to know this earlier, when I had a pothole-caused accident that left me concussed and out a brand-new (24hrs old) handbuilt wheel. I was riding with AlanKHG and dstone to TJ the other day and pointed the spot out (it had since been filled in...). One of them mentioned pressing charges against (sueing? not sure of proper legal jargon) the city for the accident, and I couldn't believe the thought never crossed my mind when the incident was fresh... I guess we'll have to blame the concussion
    :face-monkey:
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2011 edited
     
    HippyOnaBike:I was riding with AlanKHG and dstone to TJ the other day and pointed the spot out (it had since been filled in...)
    Too bad about the busted wheel! Where was that pothole on the way to TJ that you hit? I was nearly thrown off my bike the other day in a moment's inattention (remember, Penny?) when I hit a pothole Harbor southbound at the entrance to Pacific Fleet navy base in Nat City near here. However, I seem to recall there is another nastier-than-usual pothole right in the middle of the southbound Harbor bike lane a bit farther to the north, too.

    Of course, large swaths of Harbor south of Downtown are in dire need of repairs, so I guess your pothole could be almost anywhere...
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2011
     
    HippyonaBike: Sucks about the accident (and wheel!). I had a similar one and am indeed very encouraged to hear that Blane is good.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2011 edited
     
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2011 edited
     
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2011 edited
     
    does this mean i wont see them riding on the sidewalk anymore....?
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2011
     
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 23rd 2011 edited
     
    It's a good start.

    I would have liked to have seen a clarification on substandard width lanes (21202(a)(3)) as well. Like the issue of door zones, it is not stated explicitly enough in the law which can result in bad interpretations due to the lack of adequate bicycle safety training. The minimum width of a lane which is safe for a bicycle and a car to share side by side is 14' according to AASHTO and LAB and most bicycle safety experts. Texas has actually incorporated 14' explicitly into their FRAP statute. Florida's FRAP law is similar to ours but their published road construction standard states 14' as the minimum width for safe sharing which can be used with their FRAP law to make it explicitly considered to be 14'. Unfortunately, we do not have something similar.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Does anyone know if anyone at any level in the state is trying to reform CVC 40802? I am trying to get the speed limit on Fairmount Avenue (from I-8 to Meade) reduced but per the Speed Trap Law, the existing speed limit is perfectly set per the City. I think it is too fast, any other thoughts?
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012
     
    Sam:Does anyone know if anyone at any level in the state is trying to reform CVC 40802? I am trying to get the speed limit on Fairmount Avenue (from I-8 to Meade) reduced but per the Speed Trap Law, the existing speed limit is perfectly set per the City. I think it is too fast, any other thoughts?


    There are many people who would like to and some have tried, but none have succeeded. Go ask the AAA why not.

    To change the speed limit, the city is obliged to set the speed at the 85th percentile of existing traffic. There is some discretion in this in some circumstances, but not much. The problem is that the road is designed to drive fast, so people do. It would be much cheaper to lower the speed limit than to rebuild the street to make it difficult to drive fast, but the state doesn't allow that because it creates a "speed trap."
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2012
     
    There was a small tweak a few months ago that allow cities to round down to the nearest 5 mph instead of round up.

    http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/columnists/downey/article_8f64504a-a9b5-53f2-8a2f-ec0f1167599e.html
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2012
     
    ^ Thanks bossvoss! I will make my request against since it was denied the first time due to this rounding up/85 percentile rule. Additionally I talked about this with sd_mike yesterday and he mentioned that Fairmount (in this case) was the highway before the I-15 was put in, and thus the speed limits were determined based on the lack of the now existing freeway. In light of that, I think the speed limit has to be reduced since there is a faster alternative located very close by.
    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2012
     
    The same could be said for Kearny Villa Rd. With I-15 only 200 meters to the east it is redundant to have another 65 mph freeway in such close proximity. For that reason alone it would seem prudent and fair to reduce speed on KVR and put it on a road diet for the safety of the non-motorized road users who don't have I-15 as an option.

    Two deaths and several injuries to cyclists over an eleven year period should be enough to bring attention to this, yet it is still being ignored.
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      CommentAuthorPacMUle
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2012
     
    the speed being reduced on both those roads would be AWESOME, and make a lot of sense! more power to ya Sam!!!
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2012
     
    Finally, justice begins to move its slow wheels
    Trial ordered for accused hit-and-run driver in bicyclist's death

    VISTA (CNS) - A man charged as the hit-and-run driver who left a bicycle rider to die along a Rancho Santa Fe Road July 6 will stand trial and could be sentenced to four years in prison if convicted.

    Jin Hyuk Byun, 19, is suspected of driving a black a 2008 Chevrolet Avalanche that fatally struck 18-year-old Angel Bojorquez about 2 a.m. that Friday, a grocery clerk at an Albertsons in Del Mar.

    Vista Superior Court Judge Sim von Kalinowski, who heard evidence presented against Byun in a preliminary hearing, decided that authorities had what they needed to prosecute him. The set trial for Nov. 27 and a readiness conference for Oct. 31.
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      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2013