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    • CommentAuthorJust.Penny
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2017
     
    Basically are there tips and tricks to commuting that won't include me having to load up a change of clothes every time.
    I have just started back up on my bicycle for commuting. And I want to get input on clothes.

    I have heard of cycling socks.
    Are there shirts that are recommended for longer trips?
    Are there any tips for the sweaty hair with the frizz at the end of a trip?
    • CommentAuthorPetteri
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2017
     
    How long and hilly is your commute? Any work dress code requirements? What works for rolling down a couple of miles downtown from North Park won't really cut it for 15+ miles up a few San Diego hills.

    Personally I just wear full kit and shower and change, but that's because I'm firmly in the latter camp. Previously when I had a flat-ish 5-mile commute I'd bring a fresh shirt but otherwise just ride in whatever I'd wear. Then again our dress code is also somewhere between lax to nonexistent so I could even wear shorts at work if it wasn't so cold in the office...
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      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2017
     
    What Petteri said.

    My commute is from Encinitas to Torrey Pines, 12 miles one way, with hills and headwinds. I also like to use it as my workout so regular clothes are definitely not an option. I use my standard cycling gear: MTB or road shorts with chamois, jersey and various layers, knee/elbow warmers etc. as the weather dictates. I am lucky that I have showers and lockers available at work. So I come in, do my email have some coffee while I cool down, then shower and change.

    I have a set of Ortlieb panniers for my toolkit, work clothes and lunch pack and whatever else I need to lug around. Even if it rains those will keep my stuff dry. I have a set of sandals and regular shoes under my desk so I don't have to carry those.
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2017
     
    For socks, use merino wool. I recommend Smartwool or Darn Tough
    They don't get stinky even after multiple uses. I usually use one pair for 4 -5 days.
    Plus can be used in all seasons.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2017
     
    Commute to work would not be possible for me without shower. The ride to work is a full workout.

    Lately I've been riding 4 days, driving 1 day per week. On the driving day, bring 1) fresh towel 2) 4 sets of work clothes. Take home dirty towel.
    Leave 1 pr black and 1 pr brown shoes in office
    Leave black and brown belts in bike storage room, along with a pair of flip flops

    1. Ride to work in cycling clothes with backpack carrying lunch, phones, sometimes laptop, sometimes work clothes or "return trip" clothes
    2. Park bike, leave cycling shoes, socks in bike room. Grab belt.
    3. Go to locker room wearing flip flops. Shower. Stash sweaty cycling gear in plastic bag in backpack.
    4. Go back to bike storage room, take lunch and phones out, but leave sweaty backpack to dry in the bike room. Walk to office in flip flops, then change to shoes.
    5. Going home: if it's cool enough, I just wear my work khakis, using rubber bands at the ankles. Go to bike room in flip flops, leaving shoes in office. Leave flip flops and belt in bike room (use something else to keep pants up if necessary). change to a t-shirt or something warmer if necessary on top, use the cycling socks from the morning.

    If you're not me, you might be able to get away with wearing the same kit home that you wore in the morning.
    If it's too warm to wear khakis home in the evening, I'll take a second pair of cycling shorts, or just regular running/workout shorts since they're lighter/easier to haul in in the morning

    Not really possible to reuse clothes for more than one trip (let alone an entire second day), except for a shell when it's cold.

    Laundry: Ideally you would do laundry every night, but the compromise is to take several days' worth of sweaty cycling clothes and wash/soak them by hand, prior to washing them in the machine.
    • CommentAuthorJust.Penny
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2017
     
    My commute is 8 miles.
    I have a small hill and a large hill at the end. I do not have showers at work. Dress code is pants and work shirt.
    I also can't wear very much clothing because I tend to over heat but I am a jeans girl. That's why I was wondering about shirts.
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      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2017 edited
     
    In the late 1990's I had a 33mi RT commute that included Torry Pines (inside). Work had a shower so I had a change of clothes. From 2011 to 2013 I commuted from Carlsbad to Encinitas. Mostly downhill on the way there. Wore basically street clothes.
    • CommentAuthorPetteri
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2017
     
    Yeah, laundry isn't too much fun - I also find I need to wash my kit immediately at night. Even so my jerseys have started to carry a bit of a smell (tips are welcome).

    I know Levi's has bike-focused jeans and I believe other brands do too, but I haven't tried them. For shorter/social rides I'm happy in plain old 501s as long as it isn't too hot. Club Ride has normal-ish looking tech/semi-tech clothing but they can be expensive.

    8 miles is tricky - not long enough for me for a full-on workout, but not just an easy cruise especially with hills. I'd try to take it easier on the way in, ride in regular jeans/pants (maybe look for lighter ones) and bring a fresh shirt.
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      CommentAuthorCornelia
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2017
     
    Just.Penny:My commute is 8 miles.
    I have a small hill and a large hill at the end. I do not have showers at work. Dress code is pants and work shirt.
    I also can't wear very much clothing because I tend to over heat but I am a jeans girl. That's why I was wondering about shirts.


    I tend to overheat too but also start freezing quickly in sweaty clothes, so normal street clothes aren't working for me. For work commutes or social activities, a bit more dressy active wear like hiking/fishing/golf or travel shirts do work very well for me.
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      CommentAuthorSmorg
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2017
     
    My commute is just 2.5 mile with a hill at the end. It's a bit harder in the hot summer months for me (my work place doesn't have a shower, and I only have a small locker to keep stuff). During cooler periods I've been doing okay just wearing my work clothes (polo shirt + Levi 511 commuter denim pants + arm warmers/sun sleeves). During hot periods, tho, I keep the jeans in the locker and commute in cycling shorts. It's not that sanitary to keep the cycling shorts on all day long under the jeans, though. I keep a bunch of alcohol pads handy and wipe down the chamois when I get to the work place... it's better for the bum, but pretty hard on the chamois.

    Levi 511 commuter pants are pretty good to ride in. The fabric is light enough and dries quickly when wet. The ankles are tapered (so the right one doesn't always try to get caught in the chain ring, tho it sometimes will. Nothing a reflective ankle cuff won't cure!). The inside of the ankles have reflective bands for night riding. The back is cut higher than the front, so you won't moon anyone. Alas, these pants really fade easily after a few washes, and the inner thighs aren't reinforced and will wear out after a few months.

    Levi 511 commuter jeans are more durable than the denim pants version, but they are also much warmer in hot weather.

    I'd love to try Beta Brand commuter pants, but they don't seem to make anything for people shorter than 5'6" or so. :oP
    • CommentAuthoreaton
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2017
     
    Check Aero Tech Designs for commuting clothes (http://www.aerotechdesigns.com/womens-commuter-bike-clothes.html).

    My commute is very short - two half mile rides with a Coaster ride in the middle. We have showers, lockers and laundry service at work now but for my previous jobs I would drive one day and drop off clothes,
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      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2017
     
    Unless you are working on Wall Street or Jehova's Witness, just bring shirt and trousers in a burrito bag and be done with it.

    • CommentAuthorA-A-ron
    • CommentTimeSep 26th 2017
     
    I'm lucky since my work environment is very casual so I can wear pretty much anything there. I usually drive once a week so I typically bring all the clothes I need for the week on my driving day. I usually pack a lunch each day as well so sometimes I freeze a big bag of burritos and bring that on my driving day as well. Otherwise I use my single pannier to hold whatever my lunch might be for that day. I usually carry a couple of spare tubes, a multi-tool, tire levers, a presta to shraeder valve adaptor, a mini pump, a couple chain links & a U-lock. All of this and whatever else additional I might need each day fits nicely in my pannier. Since using a rack and pannier, I won't go back to using a backpack. It is much more comfortable for me to not have anything on my back while riding, especially on hotter days.

    I usually wear padded underpants w/ hiking type shorts over them and some sort of light weight work out shirt, usually high visibility colors. I've been commuting for more than a year now so I have my system pretty well worked out.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeSep 26th 2017
     
    I would look into some lighter weight hiking pants from Prana or Mountain Hardware. I love them for work, and they're lighter than jeans. I would roll them up in a bag like Sigurd suggested and wear whatever you want while riding.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 26th 2017
     
    If I didn't have a shower at work, I would take a shower in the morning at home, then ride to work in cycling clothes (or shorts and a t-shirt)--do a quick face wash in the sink, change out of the sweaty cycling clothes and into work clothes. The worst cycle commuting nightmare for me would be to have to walk around in sweaty pants all day at work. (OK, maybe there are worse nightmares, but this one is up there.)