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    Urban Repair Squad

    "They say city is broke. We fix. No charge."

    Urban Repair Squad to the rescue!
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    markphilips:Urban Repair Squad

    "They say city is broke. We fix. No charge."

    Urban Repair Squad to the rescue!


    That was brilliant. Although here we need people to fill holes with concrete more than sharrows.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    Stephan:OK, moving this discussion over from the cargo bike thread, who has something to say about what the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition should be doing and how it could be improved? As a Board member, and speaking for myself here, I don't want anyone who has something constructive to say to think they can't be heard by the Coalition. We need all the good ideas we can get. It really helps if you are prepared to do more than just complain.


    Stephan, I shouldn't speak to the subject because I have never attended at SDCBC meeting, but one of the reasons for that is that I've basically heard only two things about the Coalition: 1) Kathy is doing a GREAT job and 2) Nothing. There seems to be some visibility/credibility/image problems with the Coalition as a whole.

    In reading what people have had to say on this forum, and talking personally with others, it seems that many feel the Coalition does not represent them or their interests. Some think it has "something to do with the government" because of the word "county" in the name, while others assume that it just works behind the scenes for bike lanes and paths and other vague "bicycle related" things. The main thing is that the Coalition doesn't seem to be engaged with the diversity of the bicycle culture here. The passion and commitment of the Coalition membership is somehow not matching up with the passion and commitment of those working outside of it, like myself and others on this forum. Is it an Old Guard/New Guard issue? Is it a branding/public image problem? I don't know, but I'd sure like to see it change.
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009 edited
     
    Stephan: I've been attending every meeting I could this year and I do have lots of suggestions. But it seems that (and Kathy will agree), the big problem is money. The second problem is staffing. I am a member as is my husband, who goes by "caboose" on the forums. I volunteer as often as I can.

    I personally would like to see board members outside riding. Not to single him out but, I want to see Jim Baross riding to the farmers market. In fact I'd like to see him riding to the Coalition meeting. I ride every time and he lives a few blocks away from me and I don't understand why he doesn't. I want to see everyone riding wearing everyday, normal clothing and riding around their neighborhoods. You're off the hook since I've seen you riding around in OB. To me the impression I've gotten to date is that the only things worth paying attention to are the recreational rides: Bike the Bay, rides around Fiesta Island, etc. They're fine events that bring in money, publicity, etc. But as a bicycle commuter, I don't see how those rides help me.

    I've been on the mailing list ever since I moved to San Diego a year ago and I've lost track of how much time has been wasted by a few members arguing about vehicular cycling. Which at this point is deader than a dead horse as a topic. I'd like to see board members post on there as well. What are you all thinking? Did you ride today? Did you have a positive or negative interactions? Did you buy a new doo dad and attach it to your bike? What?
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009 edited
     
    Continuing my post from above...

    And I think it is very important for the Coalition to get into the mindset of a bicycle commuter. My bike is my car. If a Coalition event is 20 miles away at 5PM on a weekday, I can't bike there and get there in time after a full workday. If there is no shoulder or alternative to a destination, I can't get there. My bike is not a toy that I throw on the back of my car to get somewhere. My bike is how I get places. Does the coalition board get into the mindset of what it means to be a bike commuter? I want a bike version of AAA. I want the coalition to endorse local political candidates - they have to answer to a list of questions specific to bicyclists.

    If the coalition got a billion dollars tomorrow, is there a plan on how that would be allocated? There should be a vision and a goal of what the Coalition wants San Diego to look like. In that vision is the entire city bikeable? Is the entire city criss-crossed with bike lanes/bike paths? There is a defeatist attitude in the Coalition that I bet the Auto lobby in DC doesn't have. The Coalition should reach for the stars and then settle for something higher than what is bargained for. I acknowledge that the Coalition has been fighting an uphill battle for years, but a defeatist thinking is not going to get the type of results bicyclists want for San Diego.

    And San Diego is not Amsterdam, we have much, much better weather that makes biking possible every single day of the year. Except yesterday.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> beany:</cite>I've been on the mailing list ever since I moved to San Diego a year ago and I've lost track of how much time has been wasted by a few members arguing about vehicular cycling. Which at this point is deader than a dead horse as a topic. I'd like to see board members post on there as well. What are you all thinking? Did you ride today? Did you have a positive or negative interactions? Did you buy a new doo dad and attach it to your bike? What?</blockquote>

    The mailing list consist of three main people who seem to have taken an excessive of keyboard laxative. I've called them out on this, several times. Only to be publically, or privately chastised, often. And most of it has to do with "vehicular cycling". I finally got one guy to STFU for a week after PROMISING him to post something. Which in hind sight was pretty dumb on my part.

    They need an influx of new folks, and I think it's time I followed Beany's example and show up to the meetings. Starting January.
    • CommentAuthormatt t
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    markphilips:I visited Long Beach for the first time two weeks ago and was delighted to see the SHARROWS with a 5 ft green lane. The local bikeshop told me that motorists didn't like it at all because they have to share the road. It was great sitting in front of a coffee shop and watch teenagers, kids with their parents ride in the green lane. Has anybody seen anything like this in SoCal?

    Who is really blocking traffic?


    I saw these exact same thing in Boston in October. It was along Commonwealth Ave (for those how know the city) near the BU Bridge. When I was in school there I was on foot, but always saw how hard it was for bikes to cross that intersection. When I saw that green bike lane in October it made me smile and wish we had them here.
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      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    My perception is that SDCBC needs to adopt a more militant stance with fewer words and more action. SFBC projects a militant attitude in the face of obstructionist Bay Area politics that make San Diego look like a kindergarten in comparison. There is no excuse for allowing local government to look the other way for years when cyclists continue to be marginalized and threatened with death in places like Kearny VIlla Rd. and Jamacha Blvd. The comfortable bureaucrats in the City and County of San Diego and at CalTrans need to have someone continually turning up the heat on them until they finally must act to preserve their jobs and sanity. It has become apparent to many cyclists that a submissive posture is not working; it is too easy to ignore.

    The growing cycling community in San Diego County should not be satisfied with the crumbs that are offered, often in the form of quarter mile extensions of long-promised Class I MUPs, the openings of which provide grandstanding opportunities for local politicians. We don't want a bigger slice of the pie; we want the whole damn pie shop!
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    To continue my thoughts about the SDCBC above: the historian in me hears Beany's comment about defeatism and wonders if the problem lies in the past. Is the leadership of the SDCBC still fighting fights and prolonging arguments from 30 years ago instead of engaging with the bourgeoning and thrilling bicycle culture that has developed since? The long-term members of the Coalition have so much of value to offer those of us who are new to the scene and perhaps turned off by the Coalition's operating style, but perhaps there is a lack of willingness on both sides to pay attention to what the other is saying. The Coalition gets mischaracterized as not checked-in or out of touch with conversations going on within the community, and in turn some members of the Coalition are ready to characterize everyone else as "tattooed hipsters on fixed gears" or such like. I wonder if maybe it's time for something like a San Diego Bike Summit, a fresh start to conversations we're already having, but not yet all together.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009 edited
     
    I took so long to write the post above, I didn't see Ray's comment before I posted.

    I absolutely agree with his statement that SD bicyclists want more directed action, but I don't think militant is the way to go. Active, yes, but militant seems to imply defining bicycle advocacy in terms of what we're *against* and not what we're for. It's a subtle difference of perspective, but if the work is perceived as a "fight" then people get bitter, hunker down into extremist positions, and we end up with the current situation in another 30 years. I think the problem now is that the major advocacy organization has not stayed flexible, positive, and open. Ideally, any new infusion of energy and ideas into the Coalition or the broader bicycle culture would be able to move beyond the fight mentality.
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      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    Ah, that's what I get for using a loaded term like "militant." Really, what I meant to convey is the opposite of "submissive," which the word "active" conveys without the revolutionary connotations. I came of age in the '70s and obviously still carry a lot of the left-wing baggage I inherited from the anti-war movement here and the student activist scene in Europe.

    That said, I still think that SDCBC needs to adopt a more confrontatory posture in dealing with the logjam of governmental inertia in San Diego. SFBC have found this approach necessary due to the nature of Bay Area politics. SDCBC would be eaten alive if San Diego City and County were half as bad as the San Francisco Supervisors.

    This is what happens when I stay home sick from work for two days; I spend half the day in front of the time machine that is my home PC. Before I know it it's 4 pm!
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> thom:</cite>flexible, positive, and open.</blockquote>

    "fungible". My new favorite word.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    ray333:I still think that SDCBC needs to adopt a more confrontatory posture in dealing with the logjam of governmental inertia in San Diego.


    Yes! Absolutely. Another reason a lot of folks think that the SDCBC doesn't represent them as bicyclists, or that they are a behind-the-scenes only operation, or that they are somehow an arm of the government, is that we don't *hear* from them very often about what they *are* doing to stand up or advocate for bicyclists. Their public presence and visibility are not what they could or should be; a lot of people just aren't aware that the Coalition is working for us because we don't see the evidence that they are. People like me who are relatively new to this are naturally looking to the Coalition for guidance, for a cohesive plan for bicycle advocacy in this town, and we're not getting anything.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    Thanks for your clarification, Ray. Confrontational - yes, when appropriate. I like what you all are saying, and I'm emboldened by beany's "whole pie" argument.

    I want to write more about this, perhaps when I'm not just about to run to a meeting (as I am now), but there is something afoot in this country and in others: bike blogs, tweed rides, helmet cozies, bicycle chic, Momentum/Urban Velo/Practical Pedal/Bicycle Times magazines, handmade/custom bike shows, cargo bikes, bicycle film festivals, porteurs, randonneuring renaissance, cycling businesses, midnight rides, B. Spoke Taylor, handmade caps, craft cycling industries, custom frame builders, etc, etc, etc.

    There is a huge upswell of cycling culture that is also advocacy. It is confrontational with a smile and with the ring of a bell. This is the best form of resistance and advocacy - to participate in theater, in something visually compelling and resistive. This cycling zeitgeist needs to be tapped into more coherently by advocates here in San Diego.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    In discussing SDCBC, let's remember that the SDCBC Message Board is only loosely associated with the Coalition: The opinions and topics discussed on the message board are in no way condoned, sponsored, endorsed or moderated by the Coalition. The domination of a few overly vocal posters on the message board is not conducive to listening to other posters' opinions: The tone on the board can be pretty nasty and I refuse to post there.

    In my opinion, the existence of an SDCBC-labelled message board has become a liability for the Coalition, and it may be in their interest to disassociate themselves from the message board to prevent inaccurate presumptions about what the Coalition does and what it stands for.

    And I will also second previous comments that the occasional quarter mile patchwork extensions to the Mission Valley Bike Path (when I might as well just ride Hotel Circle Dr) or a "million dollar" bike bridge over some lagoon somewhere in North County does not really have much impact on my daily riding, either: Reducing speed differentials, fixing bad intersection lane and light design and doing sorely needed repairs to roadways, however, does.
    •  
      CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009 edited
     
    Now we're starting to get somewhere! I especially like the idea of resistance as living theater. This is what Julian Beck had in mind, using performance as an instrument for social change. This is nothing new. The didactic morality plays of the 15th century were essential in the transition of Chaucer's Middle English to the Modern English of Shakespeare and the King James Bible. The internet functions now in much the same revolutionary way that the printing press did as a technological advance spreading information to more people than ever before possible.

    Back to work again tomorrow, albeit with a motorcycle; I'm still too ill to ride in the cold weather I've been wishing for since August. My posts will be shorter and less frequent.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    I think the key is to have a more moderate approach to it's membership. Like this board, here, San Diego is made up of a diverse cycling scene. No matter our locomotion (fixed, 3 spd, MTB, old steel, carbon fiber, 'bent, cruiser), we have a common need: more cycling access (places to lock up), better streets, and more responsive leadership at the city/county level.

    Having sat at a few city counsel meetings, cyclist are viewed as the minority in the view of the county. With our numbers, we really are not that much of a minority. But, we trip over our selves due to our self exclusionary tactics of dissassociating our selves with other cyclist. I'm a commuter, I ride fixed. But that doesn't mean I don't like riding with tour riders, athletic types, or kids doing wheely on BMX's. Our commanlity should be our strong point.

    The mailing list is one liability. The other liability is not knowing the good that SDCBC does, just as Thom wrote. We should take these ideas to the SDCBC, but take these along with our good ideas, and our willingness to help.

    As well, I'd like to take control of CM to an extent to prove as well they are a representation of SD's cycling culture, and that we want change.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> Njord Noatun:</cite>And I will also second previous comments that the occasional quarter mile patchwork extensions to the Mission Valley Bike Path (when I might as well just ride Hotel Circle Dr) or a "million dollar" bike bridge over some lagoon somewhere in North County does not really have much impact on my daily riding, either: Reducing speed differentials, fixing bad intersection lane and light design and doing sorely needed repairs to roadways, however,<strong> does</strong>.</blockquote>

    Yes, they don't affect you, so they are not important to you, but they are important to some. Those some, combined with you, make the whole. We should not down play victories which do not affect us personally, but rather, use them as encouragement for forward growth to our many issues. "We did this, and we can do more" is, IMHO, a better plan. Again, selfish exclusion, though understandable, is not condusive to change as a whole. For example, I'm one of 4 riders I know directly affected by Jamacha Blvd, but I celebrate any upgrades in cycling in the county as signs that we can ask for and receive increases to our request.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    This may be a diversion.... but I want green-painted bike sharrows on every major city artery and designated bike route. That seems easy for the city to do. Imagine what it will communicate to the world about San Diego.

    SDCBC has been around a long time, and deserve the respect of the work they've done, and also deserve not to be painted by the actions of some members. This is an important conversation, and I think we're really going somewhere..,
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    Protorio:SDCBC has been around a long time, and deserve the respect of the work they've done, and also deserve not to be painted by the actions of some members.


    Exactly my point. We do ourselves a disservice as bicyclists if we assume that they don't work for us every day, but my sense is that they need to be more attentive to what the bicycle culture in San Diego looks like now and what it's ready to become, rather than remaining in the closed-off mindset they seem to have fallen into. It's not fair to single anybody out specifically and say "you're the problem" but I do think the bicycling public's perception of the Coalition needs to change, along with the Coalition's receptiveness to what that broader bicycling public is looking for in an advocacy organization.
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    Now we are talking! There already is too much here for me to respond to every idea, but here are a few comments. If you want to know what the Coalition is up to, you can join and get the newsletter. That said, it sounds like the newsletter might need to do a better job of conveying all the things that the Coalition is involved in. It's a big and diverse county, and that diversity is reflected in the bicyling community as well. The Coalition needs to respresent everyone from urban commuters to suburban recreatonal riders to triathletes and racers. It's a tough task, but one the Coalition should not shrink from.

    This forum is an indication of the growing vitality of the bike scene in San Diego, and the Coalition absolutely needs to take advantage of all this engery. You can be sure that your thoughts will get back to the Coalition Board.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    perhaps the coalition board should be on this forum??
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     
    Velo Cult:perhaps the coalition board should be on this forum??


    They should be paying attention for sure.
    • CommentAuthorthom
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009 edited
     
    Stephan: If you want to know what the Coalition is up to, you can join and get the newsletter. That said, it sounds like the newsletter might need to do a better job of conveying all the things that the Coalition is involved in.


    What about making the newsletter a blog so that everyone can see it, member or not? I think the idea that only members get to know what's going on only increases the sense that the Coalition is somehow separate from the bicycling public. A blog is dynamic, encourages reader contribution in the form of comments, and can be updated frequently as items arise. Unless it's very different from organizations I've been involved with in the past, the newsletter is not the main reason people are going to be joining anyway, so what's the harm in making its contents accessible to everyone?
    •  
      CommentAuthormarkphilips
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009 edited
     
    More action? "Be the change you want to see in the world." - Ghandhi

    How can we encourage more cyclists to come out in full force? So that we can create the reality of more bikes on the road. Even though it's only 0.6 miles, the new green lane w/ sharrows in Long Beach drew more cyclists than usual. They even road up and down the street a few times because of knowing that they are part of traffic. There were more bicycles parked on the sidewalks. This sparked an idea of creating that space for more cyclists on the road even on a short stretch of asphalt (and it's not painting the asphalt, yet):

    More like a social bike ride...The ride will be at a slower pace or a casual cruise. So that it will be possible to talk while on the road, meet other cyclists, and exchange ideas. The route will go around a few blocks around town (like circling a few blocks) to make it easy for people to join. There are only a few traffic lights and stop signs on the route. So there is no need to worry about being left behind. Since the ride goes in a round-about fashion, riders can exit or rejoin the group. The mini-mass of cyclists may be spread out smaller groups of 10 to 20 cyclists just going around the route a few times. Although, I used the term mini-mass, I would prefer to ride following the traffic lights and signs. So a road with less lights and signs would be preferable.

    Downtown Encinitas for example has a flat profile. Riders dress in casual clothing and will meet at one of the local coffee shops/Moonlight beach parking lot. The ride will go on a counter clock-wise fashion: south on PCH, west on K st, north on 2nd st, east on E st. So the route would be less than 2 miles but ridden several times to create the reality of more people riding together.

    Can you visualize something like this happening in your neighborhood? Someone may already have suggested a similar idea. And I think I read it in this forum, already.

    The social bike ride in Austin TX (Social Cycling ATX) began with a handful of cyclists which grew to hundreds with a very loyal following. They promote socializing between all types of cyclist no matter what level of cyclist you are, what kind of bike or what kind of terrain you ride.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> Velo Cult:</cite>perhaps the coalition board should be on this forum??</blockquote>

    That might be, uh, interesting. Thier Twitter account has become more active lately. Personally, thier mailing list has become a liability for them. Perhaps if they came here and saw the civility of SDBikecommuter, it'd help thier image, promote the cause, and increase membership?
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009 edited
     
    I have somewhat mixed feelings about the green lanes. On the one hand, they make it clear to drivers that bikes are allowed in the middle of the lane. On the other hand, bikes would be allowed in the middle of the lane anyway, because those lanes are clearly too narrow for a bike and a car to safely share. If you show this to people who don't know that, be sure to remember to point that out to them. The green lane is not giving bicyclists something that we did not already have. It's just making it more clear to everyone that we have the right to be in the lane.

    I guess the green lanes are good, but I'm concerned that people will think that cyclists are only allowed in the middle of the lane if there is a green lane.

    Another issue is that there may be times when there just don't happen to be any parallel parked cars present. In that case, the bicyclists can and should ride in the parking lane.
    • CommentAuthorcaboose
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    William, thanks for agreeing to come to coalition meeting. I agree that there are some problems "bridging the gap" in generations.

    There are also a general lack of goals and direction the coalition has. I never saw any long term planning. It's more of a firehouse where they are constantly putting out fires.

    However,

    1. Fires need to be put out.

    2. They have a wealth of contacts and experience it would take _decades_ to recreate. If one created a new bike coalition, they'd have zero clout. This hurts biking b/c it creates division in the community which is the _last_ thing we need.

    3. They are the bike coalition like it or not. The city goes to them for all things bike related. This is not necessarily a bad thing.

    4. The people at the coalition mean well and are kind. They appreciate new members.

    Basically, there is no "us vs. them" because the bike coalition is clay; it's whatever we want it to be. It all depends upon our attitudes and how we approach them. I can see some of the members on this forum as the new board members in a few years time as people retire.

    Meeting are boring, but hint, hint, boring meeting are less boring if some unboring people come to them.

    At a meeting, in b/w boredom, I feel like I am an insider being made privy to some secrets before the "public". This is a good feeling.

    I have been silent at meetings so far b/c _I_ don't have much vision right now. I am gathering information and ideas. I have some, but I still need to do more research before I open my mouth.

    Coalition members at Downtowie ride is especially cool cross pollination. Let's keep up the good vibe and allow both communities to learn from one another. Perhaps one day they will merge to create a mega-cycling community w/ sweet cross generation pollination. :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    I'm glad to see the conversation heating up here! It's exciting to see so many people interested in helping make San Diego a better bike place.
    It would be great for you all to come to a Coalition meeting and get your input on things the Coalition should be doing. We would definitely like to be doing more for social rides, group advocacy, community activism, etc. We're working behind the scenes on a lot of that, but I agree that it would definitely be better for the Coalition to have a higher profile and have members and other bicyclists feel more of a connection to the organization. We've been lacking that for a while, and frankly I'm stumped about how to make the connection. I'd like to hear more from all of you about the nuts and bolts of what you would like to see happen in San Diego County and how we can work together to make it go.

    Some of you asked what the Coalition is doing or has done. We've failed at publicizing our successes, but maybe that's something for us to work on in the coming year. In the meantime, here is a partial list of the things the Coalition has been involved in from 2005-2009, in chronological/random order:

    Note -The Coalition participated in all of these activities and projects, but each of them is a group effort of many organizations, individuals, groups, and volunteers to make this bicycling progress happen in San Diego County.

    Lose the Roaditude Campaign launched 2009
    California Street Smarts – designed and printed, available for free to the public
    Bike the Bay – 2400 riders
    Tour De Fat – 2000 participants
    Cycling events calendar – launched 2009 (thanks Sam!)
    San Diego River path, planning documents, Coalition. Continuous progress from 2005 to 2009, with OB Bike Path extension opened 2009
    Bike Parking – programs mushroomed from only EarthFair in 2006 to our own racks and six parking events in 2009. 20 year anniversary(?) for bike parking at Earth Fair in 2009.
    Oceanside bike improvements – Bronze BFC award!
    SR52 preservation of access during widening
    San Luis Rey River Bike path extension
    Signage on 56 bike path
    Marking of detectors for bikes in SD
    Bayshore Bikeway extension
    Lake Hodges Bridge
    SR125 shoulder access
    Sprinter bikes in trains, plus Inland Rail Trail
    Active Transportation Campaign
    Sharrows in Oceanside
    56 bike path extension across I-15
    South Shores Mission Bay bike path
    Padres Bike Parking Pavilion
    Oceanside helmet program
    Reverse angle parking considered in N County communities
    City road standards now include bike lanes
    Carmel Valley Road bike lanes
    Bike Night
    Coastal Rail Trail planning and construction
    Bicycling Magazine declares SD Number one city (over 1 million people) for bicycling
    Saved bicycle coordinator position at City of San Diego
    Coast Highway plans – Oceanside, Leucadia, Solana Beach, Del Mar
    Every community in San Diego County bike plan plus SANDAG Regional Bike Plan
    Education Programs – Since 2005, 187 total classes, 4198 students, including: 49 Traffic Skills 101 classes with 321 TS 101 graduates, 22 bike rodeos at local schools and youth groups, 41 Ride and Learn classes with 473 participants, 60 lunchtime seminars with 1583 participants.

    Organizational growth –Budget has grown from $52,000 in 2006 to $103,000 in 2009. Staff has grown from 1 part time to 1.5 full time staff. Office opened in 2007.

    Historic Accomplishments before 2005 –
    Closure of Sorrento Valley Road to auto traffic
    Transnet Extension passes allocating 2% for bike/ped infrastructure + routine accommodation
    Trolley Pass for bicyclists rescinded
    Shoulder access on SR52

    To find out more about what we've been doing, pretty much all our newslettters from 1987 to today are available on our website, along with minutes from the board meetings for the last year or so.

    Let's talk about what we could be doing more/better.

    Kathy
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    Hi Kathy! Welcome!

    Now, that you've put it all out there: the question is, who here is going to step away from the keyboard and show up to a coaltion meeting to: voice input, and to volunteer to help?!?!?

    I start going to meetings in January. From there, to see where I can fit in to help. That's my offer. Anyone else?
    • CommentAuthoryoshi
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    I'm in with you William. After voicing my frustration about this topic on the cargo bikes thread and kinda getting this discussion going, I've become a member of the SDCBC and I plan on attending as many meetings as possible in the new year.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    Good deal Yoshi! It'll be good to meet you too!
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    nice, glad you stopped in Kathy.
    • CommentAuthorProtorio
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     
    Right, on, Kathy. I hope that here and at SDCBC and everywhere, we think of big picture ideas, along with the specifics and concrete projects (no pun) that make everyday riding safe and effective. I want to have a vision, a grand vision, of things that San Diego can do to send the message that this is the place to live and ride and participate in a thriving cycling community. That's why I like the sharrows and green lanes, They are redundant, for sure, as we already have the right to take the lane in many cases. But the green lanes do more than let drivers know that cyclists belong - they also show the world, in photos around town, that this is a place that takes community, sustainability, and progress in the 21st century SERIOUSLY.

    Read Richard Risemberg's recent essay in LA Business Journal. I've ridden with Richard before, and bought some things from Bicycle Fixation, and he makes a great case for a larger vision in LA, while advocating for more specific action.

    Esteban
  2.  
    I would want only one thing to be done. Education for police about the CVC and how it relates to bicycles, not just how they think it does. When I'm out riding, the way I'm supposed to, I would expect the police to support that effort the same way they do for motorists. Serve and Protect is the most common motto for them. They are there to serve US! We shouldn't have to be worried about getting cited for doing the RIGHT and LEGAL thing. When that happens, I suspect bicycling will change for the better here. Until then?
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    I'm glad to see folks getting engaged with this discussion about SDCBC. If you engage, I'm sure it will only get better.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWilliam
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    <blockquote><cite> mike_ballard:</cite>I would want only one thing to be done. Education for police about the CVC and how it relates to bicycles, not just how they think it does. When I'm out riding, the way I'm supposed to, I would expect the police to support that effort the same way they do for motorists. Serve and Protect is the most common motto for them. They are there to serve US! We shouldn't have to be worried about getting cited for doing the RIGHT and LEGAL thing. When that happens, I suspect bicycling will change for the better here. Until then?</blockquote>

    And that's it? You don't want better bike lanes, more bike parking, changes to some existing laws that are anti cycling, you don't like the lane markers they've accomplished?
    • CommentAuthorSam
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009 edited
     
    Ever since the Roaditude campaign was launched, I've been thinking about ways to advocate for bicycling to the masses. I am looking at the auto industry for inspiration. And the credit card industry. They've both been enormously successful and I think we could learns tons from them.

    Since Mr. Eddie Bernays turned it into a successful formula, I too have been thinking about using psychology and tapping into people's psyche to promote riding. Green house gas emissions is not a good motivator. Guilt only works short term. But what if I promised every man that a hot young babe (or guy if they're gay) or multiple hot babes will be in your arms if you ride a bike? So I've been thinking of slogan and some sort of catchy phrase to incorporate that idea.

    The theme is based on the Mastercard commercials..where they had that little catch phrase.


    1. Who do you think she's going home with tonight? The fat slob who sits in a giant truck all day? Or the muscular, tan man who can keep going all night long?
    2. Who do you think can afford to take her out to FANCY PANTS restaurant? The man who fills his gas guzzler all day? Or the guy who rides to work every day?
    3. Who do you think knows the best make out spots with the best views of the city? The guy stuck behind traffic all day? Or the guy who knows the perfect place to watch a perfect sunset?


    And so on....

    They are a bit on the wordy side...but this is a work in progress. Now if some talented Photoshop genius would step up and put these ideas into a visual...we'll have something awesome.

    Other ideas are tamer and more kid friendly:

    1. Don't yell. Ring a bell
    2. You can smile a lot. When you're not in a parking lot.
  3.  
    I would much rather be able to take a lane legally, as we already can, and not have to worry that the police will tell us to "get over to the right" when I'm not legally obligated to do so. What about roads without markers or bike lanes? Am I still legitimate there? The police don't always seem to think so. That needs to be changed. I would like them to be there to back us up when we need it, not tell us we're wrong when we are right. Not blame us for accidents caused by others, or ignore our presence and kill us. When it comes to it, bike lanes and markings at their basic just "put us in our place".

    Parking, lane marking, and lanes aren't effective if I'm having to pay fines for doing the right thing. No, change that first.
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    • CommentAuthorLarry
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2009
     
    Good discussion everyone. I agree that it would be great for all types of cyclists to work together to advocate for a range of things that would benefit all cyclists, from better infrastructure, to better laws, to cops and judges that know the laws, to making cycling chic and not just something that we old guys do for fun.

    That said, it may also be good for there to be two (or more) diverse groups advocating for cycling in a variety of ways, some inside the system and some outside of it. The various groups should still be able to respect each other for their common goals and sometimes work together.

    At last night's coalition volunteer meeting (only the 2nd one I've attended) we were discussing some ideas to get the coalition's message and activities out there more than it has been, including more regular online newsletters, greater use of Twitter, and how to allow people to subscribe to the bi-monthly print newsletter. BTW, the print newsletter is available online, you just have to know how to get to it: http://sdcbc.org/newsletter.htm . It would be great if this online version could "come to you" rather than you knowing where to find it.

    Other ways to connect with the coalition:
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/San-Diego-County-Bicycle-Coalition/133808861794?ref=search&sid=1403233194.3163316543..1
    http://twitter.com/SDCBC
    And, tonight's Bike Movie Night at the Kensington Club: http://sdcbc.org/QuicksilverFlier.pdf

    -Larry
  4.  
    What a great thread! It is like a breath of fresh air -- cyclists who want to do more than just promote their ivory-tower ideologies. I have gotten so despondent constantly jousting and jostling and jarring and sparring and fighting on the SDCBC forum, I am ready to simply give up and let the vehicular cyclist gurus give the world the opinion that everyone in the SDCBC wants you to come to a complete stop at every single stop sign, put both feet on the ground, count to ten, frown disapprovingly at any of your friends who dare to use the Idaho common sense statute, and then go forth into the world, knowing in your heart of hearts that you are vastly superior to all other cyclists on the roads.

    I just hope Serge doesn't find this forum ...

    While I heartily agree with Mr. Ballard above about educating judges and police officers, I think it wishful thinking until we can change the consciousness in the culture about bikes. To this end, what I believe is necessary is Critical Mass and any other events where thousands of cyclists get together to demonstrate and let the world know that we already have the right to use the road. When we have 10,000 cyclists riding to demand the rights that we have already been given by the legislature, then the judges and police officers might just be in the mood to listen to said education. Until then, the judges and police officers will believe that they can interpret the laws as they please and no one will give a damn.

    Looking forward to riding with 9,999 other cyclists demanding our rights!

    Frank Paiano
    Ocean Beach

    P.S. $10 per gallon gasoline would also do the trick. (Can't wait, can't wait, can't wait!)
    • CommentAuthorModerator
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009 edited
     
    I just hope Serge doesn't find this forum ...


    The more than dozen moderators on this forum will do everything they can to keep this forum as fun and civil as you see it today. While this forum is open to the public it is not a democracy and by no means an open platform. Moderators will ban people if needed. If anyone gets out of control, time outs and even being banned is in Mods arsenal.
    •  
      CommentAuthoril Pirati
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009
     
    .

    Please, please keep this forum positive and action oriented. There is no need to devote more space to the discussion about “vehicular bicycle driving” vs “bicycle infrastructure development” theories. The great thing about this forum is that all points of view are not only accepted, they are welcomed. People on bicycles-that’s the important thing. Advocacy is great, volunteering with a group whose principles you agree with is great, but let’s not argue those principles here. There is more than enough of that on the web as is. Just my two cents.
  5.  
    il Pirati,

    "People on bicycles-that's the important thing." My Sentiments Exactly! You will get no argument from me on this point, to be sure.

    "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race." -- H. G. Wells
    • CommentAuthorLarry
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009
     
    matt t:
    markphilips:I visited Long Beach for the first time two weeks ago and was delighted to see the SHARROWS with a 5 ft green lane. The local bikeshop told me that motorists didn't like it at all because they have to share the road. It was great sitting in front of a coffee shop and watch teenagers, kids with their parents ride in the green lane. Has anybody seen anything like this in SoCal?

    Who is really blocking traffic?


    I saw these exact same thing in Boston in October. It was along Commonwealth Ave (for those how know the city) near the BU Bridge. When I was in school there I was on foot, but always saw how hard it was for bikes to cross that intersection. When I saw that green bike lane in October it made me smile and wish we had them here.


    This was a great video, and I wish we had these here too (closer than Oceanside)!

    It seems to me sharrows offer the best of both worlds: they show drivers that bicyclists have a right to the road, and they encourage cyclists to exercise their right to ride in the center of a narrow lane (I guess I won't call that "vehicular cycling," based on the comments above).

    Technique question: how many would do as these bicyclists did and stay in line with the cars? Or would you "filter forward," either on the right or the left, to get in front of the cars at each light?

    Advocacy question: How do we start advocating for more sharrows in San Diego? I sent an e-mail to the San Diego City bicycle coordinator asking them to consider sharrows on Nobel between Regents and I-5, and he said he'd forward it to the appropriate people. I took this step because they've published new maps of proposed bike facilities this month and I noticed there was nothing for this stretch of Nobel. You can find these maps about midway down this page.

    It doesn't sound like they're really set up to receive public comment right now. (Unfortunately, I missed all the public workshops that were held this summer. Did anyone go or submit comments?)

    How else can we advocate for these facilities outside of this official process? Contact our council members?

    Meanwhile, Kathy Keehan told me something pretty alarming, if I understood her correctly: because of that lawsuit against the San Francisco bike plan that required SF to do an EIR before adopting the plan, all cities in California have to conduct EIRs on plans that would take space away from cars. That will cost $400,000 (I think she said), which the city doesn't have, so the bike plan is essentially dead in the water.

    On the positive side, she did say that Clairemont Drive east of I-5 has been reconfigured to have bike lanes, and vehicle lanes were either narrowed or removed.

    (See what good tidbits of information you get when you go to the bike coalition volunteer night? -- not to mention some great home-made food.)

    -Larry
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009
     
    Hi Larry,
    Careful! I didn't say 'dead in the water' on the bike plan. I said 'they're working on it'. Which sometimes means 'dead in the water' but usually means 'going to take longer than we thought'.
    I expect the bike plan will go forward, and they'll do a smaller, less intensive EIR document for it. But it is going to take a while. I have a call in to the city staff to see what the exact status is at the moment, and I'll let folks here know what I've found out.
    Kathy
    •  
      CommentAuthorKathy
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009
     
    and Larry's right - they did take out a traffic lane in each direction on Clairemont Drive east of I-5, and they put in bike lanes up and down the hill. So it should be much easier/less stressful to get up that hill now. That's the good news. The bad news is that there's apparently some push back from the community. Those bike lanes need defending, and you can help by coming to the community meeting on the subject : "6:00pm on Thursday, December 17th at the South Clairemont Recreation Center located at 3605 Clairemont Drive to discuss the recent traffic striping changes on Clairemont Drive. The meeting will primarily be focused on why the changes were made, what other options were considered, what studies will be done to determine the effectiveness of the change, and any concerns or questions"
    Hope to see a bunch of bicyclists there!
    Kathy
    •  
      CommentAuthorVelo Cult
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009
     
    Kathy:and Larry's right - they did take out a traffic lane in each direction on Clairemont Drive east of I-5, and they put in bike lanes up and down the hill. So it should be much easier/less stressful to get up that hill now. That's the good news. The bad news is that there's apparently some push back from the community. Those bike lanes need defending, and you can help by coming to the community meeting on the subject : "6:00pm on Thursday, December 17th at the South Clairemont Recreation Center located at 3605 Clairemont Drive to discuss the recent traffic striping changes on Clairemont Drive. The meeting will primarily be focused on why the changes were made, what other options were considered, what studies will be done to determine the effectiveness of the change, and any concerns or questions"
    Hope to see a bunch of bicyclists there!
    Kathy


    thats my neighborhood so i'll help defend those lanes on Clairmont Dr. they are absolutely fantastic and excited they are there. as a driver i have not seen any negative so im a little confused on that. do you know what the complaints are?
    • CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2009 edited
     
    Larry:I guess I won't call that "vehicular cycling," based on the comments above
    Yeah. Suddenly I'm nervous about what I say on this topic. I didn't know that Serge was persona non grata around here and I'm rather surprised by that. I used to work with him and he always seemed like a good guy. He has strong opinions on this subject sure; but they are well informed and well thought out opinions too. I haven't been to any of the SDCBC meetings though so I don't know what he's like there.
    Technique question: how many would do as these bicyclists did and stay in line with the cars? Or would you "filter forward," either on the right or the left, to get in front of the cars at each light?
    It would depend. Sometimes space opens up near the lights, in which case I might "filter forward" as you say, provided that I thought I could do so safely. However, I didn't notice much of that, so I would tend to stay in line. The parked cars are still dangerous.