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    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2015 edited
     
    Akin to watching a train wreck, it is hard not to watch a good Internet squabble: However, when the involved parties are advocacy group principals - in this case from California Bicycle Coalition (CBC), California Association of Bicycle Organizations (CABO) and San Diego County Bike Coalition (SDCBC) - it is clear that our advocacy groups, at least in part, due to relentless infighting and petty bickering can only blame themselves for failing to improve roadway safety.
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2015
     
    Sigurd:Akin to watching a train wreck, it is hard not to watch a good Internet squabble: However, when the involved parties are advocacy group principals - in this case from California Bicycle Coalition (CBC), California Association of Bicycle Organizations (CABO) and San Diego County Bike Coalition (SDCBC) - it is clear that our advocacy groups, at least in part, due to relentless infighting and petty bickering can only blame themselves for failing to improve roadway safety.


    • CommentAuthorHMeins
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2015
     
    Factionalism and infighting was the undoing of the New Left starting in 1969 with the SDS split into Maoist Progressive Labor and militant Weatherman. In Germany the RAF was undone by a militant error compounded by heavy handed government response while smaller, less visible factions like the June 2 Movement diffused energy and focus.

    In any revolutionary movement, human nature leads to factionalism. Occupy collapsed under the weight of its own lack of organization when confronted by the violence of the state.

    The goal in each case is obscured and energy is spent in hair splitting and egoism.
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeJun 13th 2015
     
    Real bike advocacy with a long-term view. Engaging kids and their parents is the way to make riding a bike a popular and normal part of life in San Diego. Thanks to my neighbor and friend Nicole for putting together the Bike Fiesta at OB Elementary today, and to the Bike Coalition of San Diego County, Metro Cyclery, OKB, the Rotarians, and others who supported the event.

  1.  
    Point Loma Cluster Schools: Bike Fiesta



    Rome wasn't built in a day. Neither was Amsterdam or Copenhagen. In the 1970's when efforts began to transform these car-centric cities, I'm sure there were many obstacles and oppositions to the goals of "taking back the city" by reducing the number of vehicles and their associated congestion, pollution, noise and threat to the population's well being. There was probably a similar inertia to overcome as we see in current efforts in San Diego and the gains made at first only came in fits and starts.



    Paradigm shifts happen slowly as the old way of thinking dies away and the new way of thinking becomes established. Engaging the youth with affirmations of positive goals and what sport physiologists refer to as 'visualizing the winning outcome' are all wrapped up in these banners and artwork. Before this event, there were contests in the local schools to produce artwork and slogans to be used on the banners. These kids hopefully will be living in a world they imagine. (There were nine different banners produced and they will hang in the nine different schools of the Point Loma School Cluster, to be viewed every day by the kids, parents, teachers and staff.)

    William Ross Wallace (1819-1881)

    The Hand That Rocks The Cradle
    Is The Hand That Rules The World

    Blessings on the hand of women!
    Angels guard its strength and grace.
    In the palace, cottage, hovel,
    Oh, no matter where the place;
    Would that never storms assailed it,
    Rainbows ever gently curled,
    For the hand that rocks the cradle
    Is the hand that rules the world.

    Infancy's the tender fountain,
    Power may with beauty flow,
    Mothers first to guide the streamlets,
    From them souls unresting grow—
    Grow on for the good or evil,
    Sunshine streamed or evil hurled,
    For the hand that rocks the cradle
    Is the hand that rules the world.

    Woman, how divine your mission,
    Here upon our natal sod;
    Keep—oh, keep the young heart open
    Always to the breath of God!
    All true trophies of the ages
    Are from mother-love impearled,
    For the hand that rocks the cradle
    Is the hand that rules the world.

    Blessings on the hand of women!
    Fathers, sons, and daughters cry,
    And the sacred song is mingled
    With the worship in the sky—
    Mingles where no tempest darkens,
    Rainbows evermore are hurled;
    For the hand that rocks the cradle
    Is the hand that rules the world.


    The above poem can be found in:
    Northrop, H.D. Beautiful Gems of Thought and Sentiment.
    Boston, MA: The Colins-Patten Co., 1890.

    Maybe in time, the 1970's southern California "Beach Boys" car culture will give way to a healthier mobility culture that uses feet, pedals and when needed, public transit. (So much of the 'California Dream' is due for a wake-up call; ...population growth, housing growth, water usage, energy supply, transportation choices, ocean pollution, etc.) There's work to be done!


    Rolling out for the community ride through the business district and surrounding neighborhood.

    OB is a charming community and the good folks there are friendly and fun. The local support is genuine and engaged. As Stephan mentioned there was a lot of local support from varying groups. Andy, Judi and Stephan from the SDCBC were there to help out as was Turbo Bob and Barb. Other community reps like the Rotarians, OB Town Council peeps, and school groups as well. Thanks to SANDAG for the grant to support these efforts. Thank-you to the many local merchants and businesses that donated raffle prizes and gift cards.


    Enjoying friends, family, community and enjoying freedom of transportation choices while having fun.
    Got to love that!



    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2015 edited
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2015
     
    Backroom power meetings? Conflicts of interest? Intermingling of public and personal financial interest? Nah - can't be, can it?!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2015
     
    • CommentAuthorStephan
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2015
     
    Coming to San Diego October 25-28, the California Bike Summit 2015 by the California Bicycle Coalition. This is a gathering of bike advocates and transportation and planning professionals interested in making California a better place for bicycling, Maybe not that accessible for folks whose day job keeps them busy, but there will be some evening events open to the public, and there are some scholarships available.

    https://calbike.org/2015bikesummit/
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJul 14th 2015
     
    Let’s Put Those Tired, Anti-Bike Arguments to Rest

    http://streets.mn/2015/07/13/lets-put-those-tired-anti-bike-arguments-to-rest/
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJul 17th 2015
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2015
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 11th 2015 edited
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2015
     
    The CHP actually cited an aggressive driver based upon video evidence from a bike mounted camera. The CHP's lawyers later rescinded it, clinging to the age old excuse that if an officer didn't personally witness it, then they can't prosecute.

    Video:

    http://www.3footcycling.com/castro-valley-california-incident-bike-mounted-video-deconstruction-and-analysis/

    Petition to change that policy:

    http://www.3footcycling.com/sign-our-using-bike-mounted-video-evidence-petition/

    Comments:

    http://www.3footcycling.com/use-bike-mounted-video-evidence-petition/
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2015
     
    Poll in the UK on mandatory insurance for cyclists. Vote near the bottom of the article.

    http://www.motoring.co.uk/car-news/cyclists-should-they-all-have-mandatory-insurance_66830
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2015
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeNov 22nd 2015
     
    A review of the film Bikes vs. Cars

    http://john-s-allen.com/blog/?p=6736
    • CommentAuthorbossvoss
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2015
     
    Connect Hillcrest Training - Advocates Wanted For Uptown Bikeways Project Street Team
    If you are interested in seeing the Uptown Bikeways project completed, come join us! We are putting together a Street Team to talk to business owners in Hillcrest to gain their support for the project!

    Monday, Dec. 7th at 6:00pm at Snooze
    (3940 5th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103)

    http://sdbikecoalition.org/event/connect-hillcrest-advocacy-training/
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeApr 12th 2016
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2016
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeMay 21st 2016
     


  2.  
    Meet bicycle diplomat Ted Osius, U.S. ambassador to Vietnam

    Ted Osius’ path to becoming U.S. ambassador to Vietnam began with bicycle diplomacy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeMay 26th 2016
     
    Yet another article on road funding:

    http://www.frontiergroup.org/reports/fg/who-pays-roads
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2016
     
    What is the full cost of your commute?

    http://movingforward.discoursemedia.org/costofcommute/




    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2016
     
    End bike licensing in California:

    https://actionsprout.io/F7BF80/initial
    •  
      CommentAuthorbilld
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2016 edited
     
    How to Write an Anti-Bike Commentary—Without the Nuisance of Actual Thought (anti-bike mad-libs)

    http://www.chicagomag.com/city-life/September-2016/bleep-bloop-machine-learning-bleep-bloop/
  3.  
    City must unite to support bicycle-friendly street design
    By Dave Campbell September 16, 2016 dailycal.org
    In October, Berkeley plans to build a two-way protected bike lane on Bancroft Way, between Dana Street and Fulton Street, connecting to Fulton’s new protected bike lane. The Bancroft Way project is a test in and of itself in advance of a summer 2017 repaving project. For nine months, Berkeley is allowing the public to try out the street redesign and will make it permanent, if successful, as part of next year’s repaving.

    For those who will still be bike commuting to UC Berkeley in 2018, in the works are four more protected bike lane projects.
  4.  
    Our good friend, Nicole Burgess, is participating in Climate Ride Death Valley this week, riding 250+ miles for bikes and the environment. She is riding to raise funds for bike advocacy in San Diego. I donated to her efforts and hope others might support her as well. Support Nicole, bikes and the environment here.

    =============================================



    City Heights planners displeased with bikeway plans
    "It's for Hillcrest and SDSU, and we're just a corridor."
    Marty Graham, December 6, 2016 sandiegoreader.com
    "It's for Hillcrest and SDSU, and we're just a corridor," said Kenton Finkbeiner. "It's really not meeting the needs of our community." His colleague, Jim Varnadore agreed. "We've been somebody's passageway for too long," Varnadore said. "What we should be thinking about is safety that protects pedestrians, not what a few bicyclists want."
    The plan would take away left turns to the south and parking along one side of El Cajon Boulevard between Highland Avenue and 50th Street in order to add bike lanes and a few pedestrian amenities.
    Cortez urged the city to consider the SANDAG plans for bikeways on Meade Avenue, Orange Avenue, and on Howard (all are parallel to El Cajon) and not create redundant bikeways. But Randy Van Vleck from the City Heights Community Development Corporation said the nearby projects may not come through. "Let's not rely too much on the SANDAG projects," Van Vleck said. "They're still up in the air; they are on the back burner." Van Vleck has been active in planning the SANDAG bike routes since at least 2011. He is also a member of BikeSD, a bicycling advocacy group. At least two of those projects are funded and, according to SANDAG, more than 30 percent of the way to finishing design and engineering. They expect to break ground in 2017.
    "In order to provide bicycle lanes, parking has to be removed on one side of the street," Gardner explained. "We heard a lot of pushback on the loss of parking...." One version of the plan eliminates southbound left turns to cross-streets, alleys, and driveways from El Cajon.
    "This is the first time I'm seeing this," said planning group chairwoman Patty Vaccariello. Planning committee member Krista Berry agreed. "If I wasn't able to participate, I wonder how many other people weren't able to participate," Berry said. "In these types of projects, you need to find a balance, but I think if we have better bike safety, more people would ride."
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2017
     
    I recently moved to Azalea park in City Heights and there is a brutal section of 43rd street where it meets Fairmount that has me worried. As I haven't been active in the SD advocacy scene in 6 years, I wanted to see if anything has been discussed for this area.
    The problem is where 43rd turns into Fairmount, which is a semi-blind turn into a shoulderless funnel of doom. Just before the merge, there is a potential place for a bike/ped bypass up to the Manzanita Gathering Place and safety. Any input on this area or past involvement would be appreciated as I want to get to work on this ASAP.

    Cheers,
    Ted
    •  
      CommentAuthorSmorg
    • CommentTimeMar 29th 2017
     
    Howdy Ted,
    I've gone down 43rd to Fairmount (to get to the awesome little Laotian market on 47th and Market) a few times, sometimes detouring onto the Manzanita Meeting Place. 43rd onto Fairmount isn't that bad in late morning, though it's probably worse during rush hours. I usually would control the lane (ride pretty much in the middle of it to keep the cars behind me rather than trying to squeeze by on my left) before the merge and through the tight first block. After the first block the road is wider and you can move to the right to let them pass (or even to just park off the sidewalk until the current wave of car is through... Traffic does come in waves there).

    The detour onto Manzanita Meeting Pl isn't all that practical (it is definitely doable on road tires... though sometimes the trail is less clean than others). I'm afraid the Meeting Place is a favorite homeless sleeping place and sometimes you'll have to pass close to tents or to sleeping bodies. Making your way back to Fairmount takes a bit of zigzagging and you'll have to make a left turn across Poplar (no traffic light or stop sign on the main road). Poplar is pretty sleepy during the day. I don't know how busy it is during rush hours.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2017
     
    Thanks for the info!
    I've had a chance to ride it a few times since I posted that and it's not as bad as I thought. I usually take a right onto Manzanita and take that all the way into my neighborhood. It would still be nice to have a way to bypass Fairmount altogether, but I don't think there are enough riders in the area yet.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2017 edited
     
    Detroit, Michigan; Velomobile, Police Stop, April 8th, 2017 (Doug Grosjean)


    Wasn't sure where to post this one and didn't see a category for "Ad Hoc Vehicle Code Training - Velomobile", so in the style of Bill D, posted it here.
  5.  
    Existing Conditions & Opportunities Workshop
    ​Thursday, April 20th, 2017​
    6:00 - 9:00 p.m.
    Cadman Elementary School Auditorium
    4370 Kamloop Avenue
    Clairemont, CA 92117
    MAP
    The City is updating the community plan in order to help shape the future of Clairemont for the next 20 years. Working closely with the public, the City will update the plan with community-oriented solutions that respect the unique character and quality of Clairemont. Engage in interactive exercises to share your input for the future of Clairemont related to Land Use & Zoning, Mobility, and Parks.
  6.  
    California Coastal Commission Meeting

    Coastal Rail Trail ~ “Cardiff Rail Trail” preferred alignment
    Thursday May 11, 2017
    meeting begins at 8:30 a.m

    California Coastal Commission
    San Diego County Administration Center
    San Diego County Board of Supervisors chambers
    1600 Pacific Hwy
    San Diego, CA 92101
    MAP

    Coastal Rail Trail (Encinitas and Cardiff segments)
    Project Update – April 2017

    After years of planning and collaboration with Encinitas and Cardiff community members and the City of Encinitas, the Encinitas segment of the Coastal Rail Trail is nearing a key milestone. During its May 10-12, 2017, meeting, the California Coastal Commission will consider the project’s development application, known as a Notice of Impending Development (NOID). If the project is approved by the Coastal Commission, the project will enter the final design phase and staff will continue working to obtain approval under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Pending Coastal Commission and NEPA approvals, construction could begin in fall 2018. (This is a follow up to my posting here.)



    View Project Renderings LINK

    ENCINITAS COASTAL RAIL TRAIL FACT SHEET

    Encinitas: Chesterfield Drive to Santa Fe Drive Undercrossing Segment LINK

    SANDAG Tweet
  7.  


    I've added a news item to the Bike Walk San Diego D2 website. It concerns the proposed entry fees at Cabrillo National Monument. I encourage people to summit comments between now and September 30th, 2017. I advocate for no fee increase for bicyclist and walk-ins.

    If you agree, you may want to share the link to the news story and encourage all your peeps to submit comments as well. If you get positive support from community groups, government leaders, bike clubs and individuals, we could add their names at the bottom of the post as being in support of "no new fee increases."

    Cabrillo National Monument fee increase (LINK)

    We've got the whole month of September to submit comments but the sooner we get the word out, the better.

    Comment Now » LINK
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2017
     
    Given the parking situation there, cyclists entry should be free.
  8.  
    UCSD Challenges Public to Tackle San Diego’s Transportation Issues
    Toni McAllister on September 7, 2017 timesofsandiego.com
    The UC San Diego Design Lab has launched a city-wide civic design challenge called “Design for San Diego,” or D4SD for short, that seeks to harness the power of crowdsourcing to address transportation and mobility concerns in San Diego. The goal of the initiative is to get the public involved in designing solutions to the city’s biggest transportation issues. Mayor Kevin Faulconer and UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla are slated to kick off the design challenge Sept. 21 at Downtown Works. The D4SD challenge will take place through a series of in-person events and a digital public platform, where participants can network with other innovators interested in improving the city around the central question of “How do we create a San Diego where we all move freely?”

    Steven Dow, assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego who is directing D4SD as part of the Qualcomm Institute-based Design Lab, said the challenge is focused on four related areas:
    • Enhancing the commuter experience
    • Promoting walkable and bike-able communities
    • Improving accessibility
    • Preparing for a future with autonomous vehicles

    The official challenge begins Sept. 22, with a design sprint and hackathon, also at Downtown Works, for participants to generate ideas, form teams and rapidly prototype a concept. Teams that enter the challenge will showcase their solutions Oct. 25-26 at the Design Forward 2017 Summit in Liberty Station. The best solutions will earn prizes and private one-on-one meetings with startup investors.

    To learn more about the challenge and to register, as well as for event details, visit:
    Design for San Diego's 2017 Civic Challenge
    How do we create a San Diego where we all move freely?
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2017 edited
     
    I commute on bike through UCSD 3-5 days/week. Near the end of Spring term, on at least two occasions, in the early morning, I saw a UC police officer stopping cyclists, presumably giving out tickets. The streets and walkways were sparsely traveled at that time. I figure I saw no more than 25-30 cyclists on my whole commute on those mornings, compared with hundreds of cars. I can guarantee you that the drivers of those cars were no more in compliance with traffic laws than the cyclists stopped by the police officer. Yet the police officer thought the best use of his time, to promote public safety, was to ticket cyclists.

    So what do I think of UC San Diego's commitment to solving transit problems? Not much.
    • CommentAuthorsd_mike
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2017
     
    More often than not, I see bicyclists running stop signs most everywhere at most every time. Rarely do I see a motorist do the same. Rolling stop perhaps, but not to the point cyclists do. It is to the point that most, including myself, don't seem to trust cyclists to stop at all. Don't believe me? Come on down to Howard Ave and Alabama St (as well as Florida St) during commute times. See how often a cyclist actually stops or even slows down. Those are just two minor intersections. Most cyclists are far from innocent. I stop for stop signs and red lights, regardless if someone else is watching and regardless of traffic levels. If a cyclist got a ticket for running a stop sign, it means they didn't see ALL of what was at the intersection, despite their thinking to the contrary. Be glad it was a citation, not a collision.

    We want action for safety right? Be the action. Be the example, not complaining when there is enforcement. Safer roads are OUR responsibility as road users.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2017
     
    sd_mike:More often than not, I see bicyclists running stop signs most everywhere at most every time. Rarely do I see a motorist do the same. Rolling stop perhaps, but not to the point cyclists do. It is to the point that most, including myself, don't seem to trust cyclists to stop at all. Don't believe me? Come on down to Howard Ave and Alabama St (as well as Florida St) during commute times. See how often a cyclist actually stops or even slows down. Those are just two minor intersections. Most cyclists are far from innocent. I stop for stop signs and red lights, regardless if someone else is watching and regardless of traffic levels. If a cyclist got a ticket for running a stop sign, it means they didn't see ALL of what was at the intersection, despite their thinking to the contrary. Be glad it was a citation, not a collision.

    We want action for safety right? Be the action. Be the example, not complaining when there is enforcement. Safer roads are OUR responsibility as road users.


    What Mike said!

    I too feel like the odd man out almost every day when I actually stop for signs and red lights. Until the Idaho stop is law, them's the rules and nobody is above them. If you feel they're stupid, put your energy in to advocating for changes, don't pick and choose what rules apply to you.
    • CommentAuthorShady John
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2017
     
    Mike,
    I also believe in obeying traffic laws. I stop at stop signs (or, if there's nobody else there, I at least slow down to a crawl before proceeding). I don't run red lights. And I agree with you that cyclists often don't obey traffic laws. It is possible that the cyclists stopped by the UC police had not stopped at a stop sign, or might have been riding on a path where cyclists were forbidden. However, I disagree with you about motorists. I rarely see a motorist come to a complete stop at a stop sign. I often see motorists not stop at red lights (for right turns), and often see motorists flat-out run red lights. Motorists, as a rule, don't obey speed limits, and often this is egregious. Furthermore, cyclists who disobey traffic laws almost always put only themselves at risk of serious injury or death, whereas motorists who disobey traffic laws almost always put others at risk of injury or death.

    With this as background, I therefore find it distressing that cyclists were SELECTIVELY cited for violations at UCSD, based on my observation. If anyone should be selected for increased enforcement, it should not be cyclists. My guess is that the police officer felt he was teaching the cyclists a lesson. But the effect is chilling.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2017 edited
     
    I can barely make it through a single traffic light intersection without observing one or more motorists running "fresh reds", almost always at high speeds, thus inflicting mortal risks on themselves and their environment at large.

    Only a cyclist with a death-wish would do the same thing.
  9.  
    City asks residents to envision Escondido South Centre City
    September 21, 2017 times-advocate.com
    Envision South Centre City is a city-sponsored visioning process that invites residents, businesses, and other community members to work together to create a new vision for land use regulation, mobility connections, and quality of life improvements along the South Escondido Boulevard and Centre City Parkway in Escondido.

    According to a press release this week from the city: “We need the community’s help to ensure that Envision South Centre City includes community-supported solutions so that new development can fit into the existing community. Over the next few months, the City is providing community members with a variety of opportunities to participate and help finalize the draft specific plan’s vision to reflect the community’s most important values and commonly-shared priorities. By focusing on the issues and opportunities, we can create new ways to evaluate land use decisions to improve community health, safety, sustainability, and economic prosperity.”

    For more information about the project and to see what the City is doing in terms of outreach, refer to the link: https://www.escondido.org/south-centre-city-area-plan.aspx
  10.  
    edit...
  11.  
    ^^



    Meeting to formulate vision for Grand Avenue
    David Ross October 09, 2017 times-advocate.com

    Thursday, October 12, 2017 from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    Mitchell Room at City Hall
    201 N. Broadway
    Escondido, CA
    MAP
    As part of working with local Escondido businesses to formulate a vision for Grand Avenue in our downtown, the City has applied for funding through SANDAG’s Smart Growth Incentive Program. The visioning process is designed to gain input on various ideas for improvements that will benefit the economic vitality of our downtown. From the visioning process City staff will develop a concept plan to support the funding application.

    There will be an interactive orientation that will feature boards with design concepts, a quick presentation on complete street elements, and a group exercise at the end to develop a future vision of Grand Avenue.
    Good chance to enunciate ideas about bicycle's enhancement of
    • Benefiting the economic vitality of the downtown
    • Complete street elements (such as protected bike lanes, bike loop detectors at signals, green paint at conflict areas, bike parking, bike share, wayfinding signage etc. Safe routes to schools, recreation centers, parks and shopping. All of which mesh nicely with better crosswalks, sidewalks. reduced traffic speeds and other complete street strategies.)

    Smart Growth Incentive Program and the Active Transportation Grant Program
    Completed Project List
    Smart Growth Story Map
  12.  
    Escondido Police Awarded Traffic Safety Grant
    News Desk - October 19, 2017 times-advocate.com
    The California Office of Traffic Safety has also awarded the Escondido Police Department a $25,000 grant aimed at reducing bicycle and pedestrian injury collisions. The funded strategies will include classroom education, bicycle rodeos, community events, presentations and workshops. The grant will provide safety equipment such as helmets and reflectors to increase visibility and safety.

    After falling to a ten year low in 2010, the number of persons killed on roadways has climbed nearly 17 percent across the state, with 3,429 fatalities in 2015. Particularly alarming is the rise in pedestrian and bicycle fatalities that now comprise nearly 25 percent of all traffic deaths, along with the growing dangers of distracting technologies and the emergence of drug-impaired driving. This grant funding will provide opportunities to combat these and other devastating problems such as speeding and crashes at intersections.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2017
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:Escondido Police Awarded Traffic Safety Grant
    News Desk - October 19, 2017 times-advocate.com
    The California Office of Traffic Safety has also awarded the Escondido Police Department a $25,000 grant aimed at reducing bicycle and pedestrian injury collisions. The funded strategies will include classroom education, bicycle rodeos, community events, presentations and workshops. The grant will provide safety equipment such as helmets and reflectors to increase visibility and safety.

    After falling to a ten year low in 2010, the number of persons killed on roadways has climbed nearly 17 percent across the state, with 3,429 fatalities in 2015. Particularly alarming is the rise in pedestrian and bicycle fatalities that now comprise nearly 25 percent of all traffic deaths, along with the growing dangers of distracting technologies and the emergence of drug-impaired driving. This grant funding will provide opportunities to combat these and other devastating problems such as speeding and crashes at intersections.


    Why?

    Smartphones.
  13.  


    Bicyclists vs. Civitas residents re road
    About 35,000 vehicle trips could roll through Mission Valley development
    Dorian Hargrove, October 27, 2017 sandiegoreader.com
    Circulate San Diego, a local nonprofit whose mission is to remove people from cars and increase pedestrian and transit-oriented travel, is lobbying city officials to build a controversial freeway connector through the master-planned community of Civita north into Serra Mesa.

    The group submitted a lobbyist disclosure to the City of San Diego on October 20 revealing their support for a "street connection between Phyllis Place in Serra Mesa and Franklin Ridge Road."

    MAP
    Phyllis View Place (looking southwest and down over Mission Valley)

    For years, as reported by the Reader, residents of Civita, a transit-oriented master-planned community near Highway 163 and Friars Road, have spent years lobbying against the road. They say they moved to Civita to get closer to transit and to live in a more sustainable, pedestrian-friendly community. They claim that the road, which is estimated to serve 35,000 vehicle trips per day, will destroy the community. In regards to bike and walking paths to Serra Mesa, residents say those will be there with or without a road connection.
    Despite their efforts, the city and Civita developer Sudberry Development — a major donor to Circulate San Diego — are moving forward.

    In a September 11 email, Maya Rosas, advocacy manager for Circulate San Diego, told Moore that "because of limited staff bandwidth, [Circulate San Diego has] decided not to spend much time on this issue."

    One month later, Moore learned that Rosas and Circulate San Diego had enough time to lobby city officials to get the road approved.
    "The road connection creates a direct route to the I-805 freeway," says Moore of the group's lobbying efforts. "In advocating for the road connection Circulate San Diego is encouraging auto-dependency and is not promoting the use of transit and bicycling. A tremendous increase in traffic from the connection will increase the risk for pedestrians and bicyclists in both Serra Mesa and Civita."
    The city council will decide whether to amend the Serra Mesa Community Plan on Monday, October 30, which will give final approval for the road to be built.

    Some opponents have expressed their willingness to seek legal action if the road connection is approved.

    At the bottom of this article are many links to other stories concerning this issue. It has been developing over a long period of time and the stories follow the evolution of the topic. They're worth reading.
  14.  

    Franklin Ridge Road connector bridge. Image courtesy of Save Civita

    City Council Approves Long-Sought Bridge Between Serra Mesa, Mission Valley Despite Opposition

    Alexander Nguyen October 30, 2017 timesofsandiego.com
    A plan for a short roadway to connect Mission Valley and Serra Mesa was passed by the San Diego City Council on Monday, despite fierce opposition by some residents in the affected area.

    “Mission Valley has traffic problems and it’s going to continue to have traffic problems,” Sherman said. “There’s a lot of development coming to Mission Valley because of the trolley, and the transit and the connectivity. We need more connectivity to make this thing work.”

    Opponents in the two-hour hearing contended that traffic in the area would be worsened, not improved.
    The council members, on an 8-1 vote, certified an environmental review of the project and approved an amendment to the Serra Mesa Community Plan.

    Councilwoman Barbara Bry cast the dissenting vote.

    — City News Service
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    “Mission Valley has traffic problems and it’s going to continue to have traffic problems,” Scott Sherman said. “There’s a lot of development coming to Mission Valley because of the trolley, and the transit and the connectivity. We need more connectivity to make this thing work.”

    So the trolley is to blame for the development, thus we need more roads for traffic connectivity. Watch out Linda Vista, Morena and Sports Arena districts. The coming Transit Oriented Development (TOD) surrounding the trolley extension will necessitate widening surrounding city streets and roads to handle the needed connectivity for the increased traffic. Meanwhile, developers are rewarded with favorable 'over-lay' zoning, getting higher density, less on site parking and other benefits in order to make the projects 'pencil out'. Who knew? Ha! The immediate, surrounding residents and neighborhoods in general are impacted with no recourse or any type of consideration to the promise of an understood zoned environment. What promise will next be broken?

    The circular logic of Milo Minderbinder, in Joseph Heller's Catch-22, could not have said it any better. His syndicate, "M&M Enterprises", playing both sides, has no allegiance to any country, person or principle unless it pays him.

    Or could it be better described as the doublethink, part of newspeak, found in George Orwell's novel '1984' ? Related to cognitive dissonance, in which contradictory beliefs cause conflict in one's mind, doublethink is notable due to a lack of cognitive dissonance — thus the person is completely unaware of any conflict or contradiction.


    To realize English Socialism (Ingsoc) in Oceania, the Party created the controlled language of Newspeak, to ensure universal orthodoxy of ideology and politics among the populace. (Like-minded, group-think, comrades) George Orwell's novel '1984' (wikimedia.org)

    Calvin Coolidge's assertion that "the business of government is business" explains a lot. Our local government is in dire need of more and more revenue streams to keep the naturally unsustainable promises made to it's employees (benefits, retirement, medical, etc). The building boon, fueled by the heroin like low interest rates necessitated by the last bust, will provided enormous tax receipts to government coffers. Until the next bust.

    The ordinary, tax paying citizen, gets deferred maintenance, poor services, and forgoes promised and much needed capital projects for years and years, all of which should have been built first; like bridges, bike lanes, sidewalks, parks, recreation centers, schools, water, sewer, fire stations, etc. Often, separate funding is required for needed projects because the general fund of tax receipts is already committed to yesterday's promises (think under funded, mismanaged, guaranteed retirement plans), or tapped to pay EPA fines or lawsuit judgements. Big projects like a "toilet to tap" sewer2water project, Tijuana River pollution mitigation, SANDAG projects, MTS projects, Airport parking projects are all separately financed with taxpayer backed funding on top of the already paid property, local and federal taxes. Sheesh, what a racket!

    Developers, bankers and insurance companies will do very well with government acquiescence and little consideration of sustainability, both fiscal and environmentally, quality of life or service to the existing, long time residents of the city. They profit from the sale of development while shifting the cost of new schools, fire stations, water service, sewer pump stations and surrounding roadway improvements to the existing taxpayer. A lot of politicly correct lip service (not in short supply) is proffered by "interest groups', supporting this, that or another cause. Perhaps well meaning and only sometimes compelling, their contradictory actions unmask the duplicity and real intentions of many of these groups. They represent the scraps tossed from the feast tables of the overlords, to the lowly workforce participants, as some sort of benefited gift while they do the bidding of, and are rewarded by, the powers that be.

    It's a real trick and no treat.

    Boo!