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    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017
     
    I was in charge of maintenance for our small bike share program at work but we have since outsourced this function to the vendor where we bought our last batch of bikes for the program. Now I am switching employers and I have a box of spare parts (chains, bottom brackets, a saddle etc.) that would probably just go to the trash if I left them here.

    Does anybody know a charity or bike club near Salk (Torrey Pines) that could use these items?

    There used to be a program at UCSD that restored abandoned bikes found on campus but I could not find any link to them anymore.

    Let me know. It would be a shame to waste the stuff.

    Thanks!
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017
     
    batmick:I was in charge of maintenance for our small bike share program at work but we have since outsourced this function to the vendor where we bought our last batch of bikes for the program. Now I am switching employers and I have a box of spare parts (chains, bottom brackets, a saddle etc.) that would probably just go to the trash if I left them here.

    Does anybody know a charity or bike club near Salk (Torrey Pines) that could use these items?

    There used to be a program at UCSD that restored abandoned bikes found on campus but I could not find any link to them anymore.

    Let me know. It would be a shame to waste the stuff.



    Thanks!


    If they're in good shape, I could grab them and take them over to Bikes Del Pueblo.
  1.  
    Someone in my neighborhood is doing a bike drive for Community Resource Center, which appears to be based in Encinitas. I think you could donate parts.

    http://crcncc.org/
    http://crcncc.org/wp-content/uploads/Holiday-Baskets-Bike-Donation-Bin-Sign.pdf
  2.  
    EDIT: The links in these postings were causing a pop-up request for a log-in. The Chula Vista Star-News site seems to have just recently been put behind a registration wall. I removed the article so as to reduce any worries or consternation over the pop-up.
  3.  
    EDIT: The links in these postings were causing a pop-up request for a log-in. The Chula Vista Star-News site seems to have just recently been put behind a registration wall. I removed the article so as to reduce any worries or consternation over the pop-up.
  4.  

    Cutouts show the most dangerous streets in San Diego and statistics showing how residents are dying on our streets: 53 percent on foot, 32 percent in cars and 15 percent on bikes. (Photo by Ken Williams)

    Remembering the victims of traffic violence
    Ken Williams December 1st, 2017 sduptownnews.com
    Colin Parent, interim executive director of Circulate San Diego, said he chose to hold the somber ceremony at the intersection of University Avenue and Normal Street in Hillcrest because University Avenue is considered the “most dangerous street in San Diego.”

    “We’re here to recognize people killed in traffic violence,” said Parent, who is also a La Mesa City Council member. “This is the first time San Diego has participated in this international observation.”
    Chris Ward, who represents District 3 on the San Diego City Council, also spoke at the gathering.

    “Not one more life needs to be lost in San Diego if we implement Vision Zero,” Ward said.
  5.  
    SANDAG makes more than $30 million in grants available to fund smart growth and bike/pedestrian projects
    December 29, 2017 valleycenter.com
    To incentivize projects that promote smart growth, as well as increase walking, biking, and transit usage, SANDAG is calling on local jurisdictions to submit applications for more than $30 million in competitive grants available under its TransNet Smart Growth Incentive Program (SGIP) and TransNet Active Transportation Grant Program (ATGP).

    About $27 million in smart growth funds and $3.6 million in active transportation funds are available. Up to $1 million from the smart growth funds will be made available for local jurisdictions to complete Climate Action Plans and Complete Streets Policies. Grant applications for both programs are due by 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, 2018.

    SANDAG will hold a pre-proposal workshop from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on January 11, 2018 in the SANDAG Board Room at 401 B St. San Digo, 7th floor. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to attend.
    == More information ==

    SANDAG Makes More Than $30 Million in Grants Available to Fund Smart Growth and Bike/Pedestrian Projects
    Applications Due March 15, 2018
  6.  
    2018 GO by BIKE Mini-Grant program.
    In support of the San Diego Regional Bike to Work Day on Thursday, May 17, 2018 and National Bike Month in May, the SANDAG GO by BIKE and iCommute teams are offering grants of up to $3,000 for programs or projects that promote biking through outreach and education. Eligible applicants include local government agencies; community based and nonprofit organizations; colleges and universities; and business improvement districts, main street associations, or chambers of commerce. Examples of eligible activities include:
    • Community rides, bike scavenger hunts, or guided bike tours
    • Classes related to bike maintenance, skill building, bike commuting, and safety
    • Local “Bike to Work” or “Bike to Campus” events
    • Campaigns or contests that promote bike riding
    • Bike-in movie events
    • Public events or rides that open city streets to bikes

    The application for the 2018 GO by BIKE Mini-Grants is now open, with a total of $40,000 in grant funding available.

    To apply, submit your application form to iCommuteGrants@sandag.org by 5 p.m. on January 19, 2018.
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
     
    it would be great if our discount program got some of this money. we need to get the word out via advertising, and perhaps set up group rides, say tour de coffee - visiting all the shops on the program
  7.  
    Valley Center Road Traffic Control Poll
    January 20, 2018 valleycenter.com
    The Valley Center Planning Group is seeking a grant to explore various traffic calming options for Valley Center Road. Among them are roundabouts and additional traffic lights. What is your opinion? (you can only vote once on each question – and once your vote is placed, it can’t be modified)
  8.  
    Caltrans Updates Outreach Methods to Increase Public Involvement During Transportation Planning and Programming Process
    Comments Sought on Public Participation Plan
    "An involved and well-informed public can contribute valuable input during all stages of transportation decision-making. Public feedback on this plan is necessary in creating a document that makes it easy to understand the transportation planning and programming process so more people can influence state, regional and local transportation decision-making."
    ~ Malcolm Dougherty, Director, Caltrans
  9.  


    San Diego Fields Online Survey To Measure Commute Habits
    Andrew Bowen January 31, 2018 kpbs.org
    San Diego officials began conducting an online survey this week that aims to measure the city's commute habits, which are central to its ambitious plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Transportation is San Diego's largest contributor to climate change, accounting for about 55 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. The city's landmark Climate Action Plan expects huge numbers of city residents to start living closer to where they work, and to bike, walk and ride public transit to their jobs in much greater numbers.

    Those numbers have been difficult to measure, however, and officials have struggled to find reliable and consistent data that can demonstrate whether they are doing enough to reduce the city's chronic dependence on the automobile.

    The survey will soon be available in Spanish, she said, and respondents can enter to win a free one-year membership in the city's bike sharing program.

    City of San Diego Commuter Survey
  10.  
    I saw the survey--didn't know if I should fill it out from a sense of pride (for the month of January I rode my bike to work every day except for two days) or not fill it out, because I have a feeling that every cyclist they can count will go towards foot dragging about doing anything else to accommodate cyclists. It took me ages to cross Torrey Pines Blvd this evening, and I saw a pedestrian doing a near-suicidal walk down the central turn lane on TP because there's no legitimate way to even cross the street for blocks. Improvements have been planned for years, and haven't happened. I don't want anybody to think that situations like this (and countless others in San Diego) are OK.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2018
     
    Pretty soon, only the homeless will be brave enough to ride a bike.
  11.  

    The Escondido Creek Conservancy recently discovered an illegal trail built on its property and an adjacent lot totaling one mile in length. Restoration efforts are ongoing and a public restoration event is scheduled for March 4, 2018. Courtesy photo

    Escondido Creek Conservancy working to restore illegal trail

    Steve Puterski February 22, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    ESCONDIDO — Vandals struck and left untold damage through at least a half-mile stretch of the Escondido Creek Conservancy.

    The Escondido Creek Conservancy Executive Director Ann Van Leer said one or more people constructed an illegal one-mile mountain bike path. Van Leer said the organization discovered the vandalism in December, which also ran through another private property in Harmony Heights, near the San Marcos and Escondido border.

    “I get pretty upset and it’s very concerning that people don’t understand the value that is there,” Van Leer said. “The trail makers, whoever they were, were taking steps to conceal themselves. They had equipment tucked underneath the vegetation. Unless you were down on your hands and knees, you really couldn’t see it.”
    The conservancy has partnered with the San Diego Mountain Bike Association to assist with the assessment of damage and steps moving forward. Susie Murphy, executive director of the association, said illegal construction of trails is a problem throughout the county. Murphy added it is difficult to reach those who feel the need to destroy protected habitat on private property. “It’s nothing new and people have been going into canyons and think they can do anything they want without checking land ownership,” she said. “It’s just a matter of ongoing education. You are kind of dealing with some people who aren’t interested in following the rules anyway, so they are definitely a hard audience to reach.” However, she is encouraging her group and residents to join the conservancy on March 4, 2018 for a restoration event. Van Leer said the work is hard over rough terrain, but worth the effort to begin the restoration efforts.
    “We welcome respectful use of our land,” Van Leer said. “Most of our land has some public use. We want people to stay on the trails and respect that the land has been protected for wildlife.”
  12.  


    High School Laptop Scholarship Contest
    Thursday, March 1, 2018 to Sunday, April 8, 2018
    Our annual Laptop Scholarship Essay Contest is back! San Diego County high school students (grades 9 - 12) are invited to enter our essay contest for the chance to win a new laptop. 40 winners selected, deadline to enter is April 8th, 2018.

    Would a new laptop help set you up for success at school? We thought so! The Metropolitan Transit System (MTS), Coca-Cola and the San Diego County Office of Education will be giving away 40 laptops this spring! Students enrolled in a San Diego County High School (in grades 9-12) are eligible to apply for the 2018 Laptop Scholarship Essay Contest.
    Maybe a nice essay about coordinating transit and bikes to facilitate commuting to school and other activities. Bikes complete the trip in that last mile!
  13.  
    This Alphabet-Backed Startup Wants Cities To Make Better Use Of Curbs
    Lara O'Keefe March 21, 2018 bisnow.com
    Named Coord, the startup uses technology to map cities in order to provide municipalities and transportation companies like ride-hail, bike-share and car-share providers with a detailed guide of how curbs can be used, Fast Company reports.

    Rather than using street imagery, Coord collects data by walking the streets of cities like San Francisco and recording information on a smartphone app that uses augmented reality technology. This method ensures the maps are accurate because street imagery can obscure some curbside features, CEO Stephen Smyth wrote in a Medium post.
  14.  

    Early bird registration for #BiketoWorkSD 2018 ends this Sunday! Register now to #GObyBIKEsd on the morning of Thursday, 5/17 for the chance to win a $500 gift card to Revolution Bike Shop.

    You must register to receive a free 2018 Bike to Work Day t-shirt. You will be asked to show your registration confirmation email in order to pick up your t-shirt at an official pit stop on Bike to Work Day.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2018
     
    Anyone know when LA bike to work is?
  15.  
    bikingbill:Anyone know when LA bike to work is?


    Not Bike to Work Day but METRO is doing their part. I expect they will have more to say about Bike to Work Day 2018 soon.

    There is a dearth of information from what should be informed advocacy groups. Two weeks until Bike Month and with such pitiful public relations, you wonder how groups like LADOT, Santa Monica Spoke, LACBC can ask for support or claim to serve the bike community. They really need to get rolling!

    At least METRO is on it. That's something.
    Metro LA Bike to Work Day: May 17th, 2018

    Metrolink Free Bike to Work Week - May 14-18
    Bring your bike and ride free! Metrolink will offer free rides during Bike Week, May 14-18, 2018 to anyone who brings a bike onboard Metrolink. This offer will be effective on all Metrolink trains in operation Monday through Friday. Riders must accompany their bike for the entire trip. Free ride offer is limited to one person per bike.


    === San Diego Bike to Work Day 2018 ===
    === Nothing to see here, keep moving along... (as of posting...) ===

    SDCBC: Events
    SDCBC: Events May
    Nothing on Bike Month, Bike to School Day or Bike to Work Day
    To be fair, there was this cryptic posting to their twitter account.

    BikeSD Calendar
    Nothing on Bike Month, Bike to School Day or Bike to Work Day

    San Diego Mountain Bike Association
    May Events -- Nada

    CALBIKE Events -- Nada

    === Timely Information Posted ===

    SANDAG iCommute Bike Month
    SANDAG iCommute Bike Month Event Listings
    The government entity everyone loves to hate is on it. Ha!

    MEDIA REPORTING:
    San Diego Reader
    Coronado Patch
    KPBS
    East Village San Diego
    OsideNews
    San Diego Bicycle Club
    RacePlace
  16.  

    Hannah Walchak, the conservation land manager for The Escondido Creek Conservancy stands where an unauthorized bike trial in the Harmony Heights Preserve was discovered in December. The trail damaged the vegetation and perhaps the sensitive natural wildlife habitat. (Howard Lipin)

    Conservancy removes illegal bike trail that marred wildlife preserve
    Deborah Sullivan Brennan April 20th, 2018 sandiegouniontribune.com
    On her routine inspection of properties in the Escondido Creek Conservancy earlier this year, Hannah Walchak spotted something new — an illegal, but carefully constructed mountain bike trail, snaking down the hillside on sensitive wildlife habitat. Walchak, conservation land manager for the organization, investigated and found that the trail was freshly built, and formed a five-foot-wide scar more than a mile through the brushy hills. Someone who knew what they were doing had hacked the California lilac from the path, tossed it aside and moved rocks to create a smooth, steep surface for riding.

    “What we found were freshly snipped trunks” of brush, Walchak said. “They were still wet. And the clippings that were tossed aside were still green. So we found it as it was in construction.”
    What began as an unwelcome intrusion, however, helped the conservancy forge ties with the surrounding community, as local volunteers and service groups came out to help repair the damage. The North San Diego Young Marines, a youth service organization, turned out to help close off the trail, along with some volunteers from the conservancy and the San Diego Mountain Biking Association.
    A group of Conservancy volunteers known as the Conservation Crew worked on decommissioning the trail. And the San Diego Mountain Biking Association also sent some trail crew leaders to help out, and advise the conservancy on the best way to remove the illegal build.

    The organization works with local governments, as well as various land conservancies, to create legal trails in less sensitive areas, said Susie Murphy, executive director of the San Diego Mountain Biking Association. It can take up to a decade of planning to pave the way for legal trails accessible to mountain bikers or other trail users such as equestrians and trail runners, Murphy said, so the organization educates its members about that process. “We (encourage) our members and the public to come and work with us on legal maintenance and build days that we promote through years of planning,” she said. “The digging is the easy part, but it can take a decade to work with the agencies and the land managers to get ready to put shovels in the ground.”

    Some trail enthusiasts become frustrated with the process, or lose patience with the lack of trail connections in popular areas, Murphy said, so they cut corners and build their own routes. That undermines other efforts to create trail networks legally, she said. “We’re trying to make people understand that they’re jeopardizing their own sport," she said.
    Although the San Marcos trail was a trespass, it was apparently constructed by someone who knew what they were doing, conservancy officials said. “It was a well-established bike trail,” Serrato said. “It was quite impressive, actually, the work that went into this.” Those skills are better harnessed to maintain and construct legal bike trails, Walchak said. Although it was disappointing to find the gash along the hillside, the effort to repair it represented the kind of community investment in the land that the creek conservancy aims to cultivate, she said.

    “This started out as a really negative experience, and quickly became a really positive one, because of these wonderful new partnerships,” she said.


    (See related post above: February 23rd, 2018)
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2018
     
    We need more trails. What is the process to define a new trail?
  17.  

    SDMBA



    Top 10 Projects 2017-18

    Land Stewardship / Liaison Program
    SDMBA Volunteer Liaisons provide direction, education, and hands-on building and maintenance of trails throughout San Diego County. Liaisons work with park rangers, city councils, community groups, and others concerned with maintaining accessible and sustainable recreational trails for our citizenship to provide balanced access for all trail users.



    Trail Building and Maintenance
    Trail work Days are an important element of promoting access to trails by helping to design, maintain, and build sustainable trails for all users. Trail building includes construction of bridges, cutting fresh trails, repairing damaged trails, working around endangered habitats and species, private and military property owners, securing a wide variety of tools, organizing volunteers into workable trained teams, training team ‘trail bosses’, developing robust relationships with area Liaisons and agencies, and providing a majority of work during our brief rainy season when trails are most workable.

    Trails Committee
    If you want to get involved in trail planning and digging, then become connected with one of our Land Stewardship Teams. To volunteer come to an Advocacy Committee meeting or contact Don Sutton at don@sdmba.com
  18.  


    Metrolink Free Bike to Work Week - May 14-18
    Bring your bike and ride free! Metrolink will offer free rides during Bike Week, May 14-18, 2018 to anyone who brings a bike onboard Metrolink. This offer will be effective on all Metrolink trains in operation Monday through Friday. Riders must accompany their bike for the entire trip. Free ride offer is limited to one person per bike.
    Would love to see this in San Diego.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2018 edited
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:Would love to see this in San Diego.
    If you are at least 16 years old, you can take your bike aboard the San Diego Trolley. During rush hours (6-9 AM and 3-6 PM on weekdays) only one bicycle is allowed on each trolley car. At other times, two bicycles are allowed on each trolley car.

    San Diego Trolley bike capacity: 1-2 bikes per car. And bikes are unlawful if you are school-age.
  19.  
    Ouch! San Diego needs to get rolling.

    Metrolink Everyday Discounts
    Student/Youth: 25% off Monthly Pass, 7-Day Pass, One-Way and Round-Trip tickets
    Students: Please present valid Student ID to the fare inspector upon request.
    Youths: Ages 6 to 18



    Metrolink has added Bike Cars to accommodate more bikes on select trains and you can now bring your surfboards onto Metrolink trains to go surfing at Southern California beaches. The lower levels of the new Bike Cars are equipped with multiple stalls that are designed to hold three bikes each. Bike Cars are identified by a yellow “Bike Car” decal on the side of the train.

    Bikes are allowed on ALL Metrolink train cars and each train car is designed to hold three bikes. The special Bike Cars are designed to hold 9 bikes on the lower level.
    Boards, bikes and the beach. Imagine San Diego youth being able to access the beaches, cruise the boardwalks, ride the bay, surf the breaks from Garbage to Windansea. Hell, they could do the Jr Lifeguards program, summer camps, play volleyball (think Bill Walton's volleyball courts in South Mission Beach), soccer or even get to a summer job! All without contributing to the traffic, parking hassles and pollution that car rides would promote. Let the kids enjoy the San Diego parks and beaches that the community has provided with sweat and taxes.

    The OB Bike path is great but it's not the only route used to get from the trolley to the beaches and bay. Another reason why the routes from the new trolley stops (especially Balboa Trolly Station) should be safe for bicyclist, skaters and scooters; never mind needed pedestrian facilities for families, strollers and carts. (Build the bike-bridge!)

    The good, common sense of free bike transport with a ticket on the Coronado Ferry is a stellar example of promoting clean, alternative transportation which helps to reduce the impacts of vehicles swarming the island. Good for business, the environment and quality of life. Check out the waves, take in a sunset, see a green flash, gaze at the stars!

    The future is approaching relentlessly and clever, alternative transportation needs and solutions must be imagined and accounted for in the expected buildout of much denser urban environments. All of this should be built with current investments in today's dollars and low interest rates. Inflation's dogs are soon to be let loose and there will no getting it done then.
  20.  


    Two open houses will be held at @SDCaltrans on Monday, April 23, 2018 at 11:30am and 5:30pm to discuss the @SANDAG 2019 Regional Plan. Come out and lend your voice to this critical planning effort. http://bit.ly/2Hi0k7U
  21.  

    Overview of the 2019 Regional Plan

    SANDAG is developing San Diego Forward: The 2019-2050 Regional Plan, which will provide a big-picture vision for our region over the next 30 years. The 2019 Regional Plan will provide a comprehensive path forward for the future of our region, forecasting various components such as population, where people will live, and where they will work. The plan will consider land use, transportation, open space, technology, and greenhouse gas reduction strategies to craft the overarching vision for the future. Your input is a vital part of the development process, as the 2019 Regional Plan intends to address the needs of diverse communities and constituencies throughout San Diego County. SANDAG values and encourages community input, and the agency is excited to hear what you would like to see in your future community. Spread the word and help SANDAG develop a plan that supports the economy, regional mobility, and improves our overall quality of life. Find out about upcoming opportunities to provide input at the places you frequent or from groups you follow in your community. To learn more about the visions, goals, and policy objectives for the 2019 Regional Plan and how you can get involved, visit http://www.SDForward.com and sign up to receive email updates at http://www.SDForward.com/subscribe.

    Can’t make any of the Regional Plan open houses? Take our survey! Let us know what transportation issues are most important to you at http://SDForward.com/survey. As part of this process, we are asking for your input on what you think the San Diego region’s transportation network should look like in the future and what transportation issues are most important for your quality of life. This survey is available through May 10, 2018.
  22.  

    Photo: Bike Texas

    Six Secrets From the Planner of Sevilla’s Lightning Bike Network
    Michael Andersen, PlacesForBikes May 7, 2018 usa.streetsblog.org
    Manuel Calvo had spent years in Sevilla bicycling activism and was working as a sustainability consultant when he landed the contract to plan a protected bike lane network for his city. The result was the Plan de la Bicicleta de Sevilla, mapping the fully connected protected bike lane network that would make Sevilla’s success possible. But as Calvo explained in his keynote Wednesday and an interview afterward, the story might not have played out that way.

    Here are some things for U.S. bike believers to learn from Calvo’s account.
  23.  
    REMINDER: San Diego Forward: The 2019-2050 Regional Plan survey is available through Thursday May 10, 2018.

    You have an opportunity to express your opinions, ideas, and insights in written form. Make it count! Contribute to the planning with your expertise, knowledgeable and imaginative ideas and help design the future.

    Take the survey! Let us know what transportation issues are most important to you. As part of this process, we are asking for your input on what you think the San Diego region’s transportation network should look like in the future and what transportation issues are most important for your quality of life.

    (See April 24th posting above.)
  24.  

    Minette Ozaki of San Diego Mountain Bike Association, who made a presentation to the parks board on the Crow’s Nest Bike Park.

    County updates parks board on funding proposals

    May 04, 2018 valleycenter.com
    Minette Osaki, representing the San Diego Mountain Bike Association asked permission to revive construction on the Crow’s Nest Bike Park that was started four years ago, but never finished.

    “Bike parks are now in the present,” she said, noting that her group would like to finish the project they started. The association will first talk to the County about obtaining a grant. If it doesn’t get that it would seek funding on its own with the goal of completing the project professionally. “I think if we could get this park opened to the public it would be a win, win,” said Osaki. It would be the first completed park of its kind this side of Big Bear, she said.

    The unfinished park is 1.5 acres. Some of the work that was done would have to be redone to bring it up to a professional standard, she said. About half of that work is completed. Asked what she needed from the board, Osaki said, “I’m looking for anything but a red light.” “I think it’s a good idea but I wonder if one and a half acres is enough,” said Director John Vick. “I’m in favor.”

    Laird said such a park would probably attract users from Escondido. He suggested that if it gets enough usage that it might be expanded into Cole Grade Field, which is “underutilized,” he said. “If it can be utilized for something the public will use we should make that change.” LaHaye said the district collects rent from the use of Cole Grade Park now. “I know that something like that would be used,” said Trok of the bike park. “There’s not any other use you are going to find for a hillside like that,” concluded Glavinic.

    The board unanimously approved allowing the association to finish the park. —DDR
    San Diego Mountain Biking Association
    SDMBA on Twitter: @sdmba
    SDMBA on Facebook: @SDMBA
  25.  
    Open House and Public Hearing to be held May 16, 2018
    SANDAG will host an Open House and Public Hearing for the University Bikeway project on May 16, 2018.

    Wednesday, May 16, 6 - 8 p.m.
    6 - 6:45 p.m. Open House
    6:45 - 8 p.m. Public Hearing

    Location: Joan Kroc Center, Community Room
    6845 University Avenue, San Diego, CA 92115
    MAP
    The public hearing will be held from 6:45 – 8 p.m. and will be preceded by an open house from 6 – 6:45 p.m. showcasing project features and updates. During the open house portion of the meeting, attendees will have the opportunity to talk with project team members and provide feedback.

    SANDAG published a Traffic and Safety Impact Assessment for the project on May 1, 2018. Holding a public hearing and preparing the Traffic and Safety Impact Assessment are required before the SANDAG Board of Directors can determine whether the proposed project is exempt from CEQA.
  26.  
    Guest Editorial: Prioritize bikes, transit to fulfill climate promises
    Sophie Wolfram May 18th, 2018 sduptownnews.com
    Two years ago, San Diego put itself on the map as a city on the forefront of the battle against the climate crisis, the greatest threat to our health, safety and quality of life. With the support of Mayor Kevin Faulconer, the City Council voted unanimously to adopt a Climate Action Plan, or CAP, that makes a legally binding promise to slash our emissions in half.

    Making alternatives to driving safe and accessible, as well as convenient and appealing, is a big part of what the mayor and council promised San Diego families in the CAP. The city has established quantifiable targets for walking, biking and transit ridership, and they’re ambitious but achievable. That’s something to be proud of.
    But progress on transportation is limited at best. The mayor needs to make the CAP’s walking, biking and transit goals a top priority to fulfill the promise of a better future for our children.

    We need three things from our mayor: A roadmap detailing how we will meet the targets, investment in transit and bike infrastructure, and championing a regional plan at San Diego’s Regional Planning Agency (SANDAG) that meets these goals.
    Read more in this article...

    Sophie Wolfram is director of programs at Climate Action Campaign.
    • CommentAuthorsynthetic
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2018
     
    So we did not get the Sandag grant, which upset me as the money ($3000 per request) went to 1 day programs with very low turn out... while our discount program is all year!

    But, I would like to thank forum member Mike Z, who donated $100, which I was able to use for online advertising of the program. Please keep spreading the word, and supporting the businesses on the program - when businesses are on our side, we can see more cycling infrastructure.
  27.  


    Public Comments needed for Orosco Ridge Trail Plan
    This is your opportunity to let the Forest Service know that this plan for 20 miles of new trail is important to you!
    Comments due by May 25, 2018.

    Laguna Mountain Recreation Area Trails Plan
    San Diego Mountain Biking Association is excited to announce new trail coming to Mt. Laguna!
  28.  
    Opinion: Solving Homelessness with Bike Wrenches and Crème Brulees
    Deacon Jim Vargas May 22, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Today, bike repair is the fifth most sought-after skill trade across the country, according to 2018 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Demand is above average for these bike workers, who currently earn $13 per hour to start, or $1.50 above minimum wage.

    That’s why our newest job training program provides hands-on practice in repairing bicycles. Two of our maintenance supervisors lead this four-week training course. During the course, students learn total bike repair skills like tire and tube repair, gear, brake, chain, wheel and frame repair.

    ~ Deacon Jim Vargas is president and CEO of Father Joe’s Villages.
  29.  

    Sign-Up Period for EV Climate Credit Ends in a Week

    Debbie L. Sklar May 24, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Time is running out for electric vehicle drivers in San Diego and southern Orange counties to sign up for the EV Climate Credit – a utility bill credit that could amount to several hundred dollars for those who own or lease a plug-in hybrid or fully electric vehicle.

    San Diego Gas & Electric will accept applications for the EV Climate Credit (sdge.com/evcc) through May 31, 2018. This bill credit is part of a statewide program administered by the California Air Resources Board to fight climate change by encouraging EV adoption. This year’s credit amount is expected to be substantially higher than last year’s (which was $200), in large part because the low-carbon fuel credits – the source of funding for the EV Climate Credit – have gone up in market value.
    When local EV drivers plug in their vehicles, they are charging with some of the cleanest energy in America, because today around 45 percent of the electricity delivered by SDG&E to homes and businesses comes from renewable sources, such as solar and wind. That’s more than five times higher than the national average of about 8 percent.

    SDG&E’s EV Climate Credit is available to current owners of plug-in electric vehicles in SDG&E’s service area that are registered to residents, and not commercial fleets. To sign up for the credit, you will need your SDG&E account number and DMV registration card. A bill credit will be applied this summer, starting in June.
    Why are e-bikes not given credit for their contributions to Green House Gas(GHG) reductions? Not only reduction of GHG's but reduction of traffic congestion, parking requirements, noise, wear and tear on the roads etc. Users such as the many students, military, tourists and locals alike, using the bikes to make intermediate length trips, go a long way toward contributing significantly to GHG reductions.

    If the purpose of the program is to encourage the use of electricity as a clean energy source for mobility, why not e-bikes? You get a lot more bang for the buck with their single user energy efficiency, smaller footprint and outsized contributions to reducing mobility impacts to the public space.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbatmick
    • CommentTimeMay 24th 2018
     
    Old Knotty Buoy:
    Sign-Up Period for EV Climate Credit Ends in a Week

    Debbie L. Sklar May 24, 2018 timesofsandiego.com
    Time is running out for electric vehicle drivers in San Diego and southern Orange counties to sign up for the EV Climate Credit – a utility bill credit that could amount to several hundred dollars for those who own or lease a plug-in hybrid or fully electric vehicle.

    San Diego Gas & Electric will accept applications for the EV Climate Credit (sdge.com/evcc) through May 31, 2018. This bill credit is part of a statewide program administered by the California Air Resources Board to fight climate change by encouraging EV adoption. This year’s credit amount is expected to be substantially higher than last year’s (which was $200), in large part because the low-carbon fuel credits – the source of funding for the EV Climate Credit – have gone up in market value.
    When local EV drivers plug in their vehicles, they are charging with some of the cleanest energy in America, because today around 45 percent of the electricity delivered by SDG&E to homes and businesses comes from renewable sources, such as solar and wind. That’s more than five times higher than the national average of about 8 percent.

    SDG&E’s EV Climate Credit is available to current owners of plug-in electric vehicles in SDG&E’s service area that are registered to residents, and not commercial fleets. To sign up for the credit, you will need your SDG&E account number and DMV registration card. A bill credit will be applied this summer, starting in June.
    Why are e-bikes not given credit for their contributions to Green House Gas(GHG) reductions? Not only reduction of GHG's but reduction of traffic congestion, parking requirements, noise, wear and tear on the roads etc. Users such as the many students, military, tourists and locals alike, using the bikes to make intermediate length trips, go a long way toward contributing significantly to GHG reductions.

    If the purpose of the program is to encourage the use of electricity as a clean energy source for mobility, why not e-bikes? You get a lot more bang for the buck with their single user energy efficiency, smaller footprint and outsized contributions to reducing mobility impacts to the public space.


    I had been wondering the same thing before. We have two electric cars so we take full advantage of this credit as well as the $7500 federal subsidy when buying it and the $2500 from the state of California. And then there's the subsidies you can collect if you carpool but if you ride a bicycle or e-bike it's crickets. Why is that?
    •  
      CommentAuthorSigurd
    • CommentTimeMay 24th 2018
     
    After Public Shaming, SANDAG Has More Bike Project Delays

    Board members of the San Diego Association of Governments on Friday are due to vote on a budget that contains more delays for bike safety projects, one week after the agency was publicly shamed by a taxpayer group for the slow rollout of those projects.
    By the end of the current fiscal year, SANDAG will have spent $73 million on its regional bikeways program. Since the adoption of that program five years ago, the agency has opened 7.5 miles of bike lanes to the public.

    $73 million for 7.5 miles of bike lane! That equates to $2,000 or so per linear foot of bike lane paint, if my math hasn't failed me.
    • CommentAuthorgottobike
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2018 edited
     
    SANDAG Vision Zero MUTCD - 2018 Edition
    @AASHOTkills-NOPEDS
    @AASHTOkills-NOBIKES
    Within budget and @AASHTOkills approved, of course.
  30.  

    The concept plan for the Verdi Pedestrian Rail Undercrossing Project shows paths originating near Verdi and Liszt Avenues that will cross the Cardiff Rail Trail and go under the tracks to Highway 101. The plan will allow safe pedestrian and bike access to the beach, but the construction portion of the project has not yet been funded. (Enlarge image by: right click - View Image)

    Verdi crossing gets preliminary design, but construction funding remains uncertain

    Carey Blakely May 25, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    ENCINITAS — Using “land” as the theme, landscape architect Mike Peltz revealed his vision — which takes inspiration from the Cardiff bluffs, sand art and other terra firma elements — for the design of the Verdi Pedestrian Rail Undercrossing Project.

    The project would provide a safe way for pedestrians and bike riders in Cardiff to cross the railroad tracks to access South Coast Highway 101 and the beach. The only other legal places to traverse the tracks, Chesterfield Drive and Santa Fe Drive, are about 1.3 miles apart. Verdi would provide a third crossing roughly halfway between the two existing ones. Specifically, the proposed plan is to install pathways west of San Elijo Avenue near Verdi and Liszt avenues. Those paths would allow pedestrians and bikers to cross the Coastal Rail Trail (currently under construction) and go under a bridge that will be built to support the railroad tracks.

    So far, the City Council has allocated $1,784,019 to HDR Engineering, Inc. for the project, which provides funding through the phases of design, environmental documentation, permitting and public outreach. Villa, Peltz and other team members presented the project’s background and design plans to the public on May 21 at Cardiff Elementary School. About 50 people attended.

    An audience member commented that SANDAG hosted similar public hearings about the Cardiff Rail Trail but “didn’t use any of our input.” Villa assured him that public input was welcomed and had the potential to impact the final design. She encouraged attendees to fill out the commentary cards with suggestions. Villa plans to host one more community meeting but is open to more if needed.
    The Verdi path would be ADA compliant and lead to a viewpoint east of the tracks that provides ocean views and benches. One meeting attendee said that maybe the “Cadillac” plan being proposed should be scaled back in order to speed up the process. She’ll soon lose her beach access and wants this new crossing installed quickly. The fence for the Coastal Rail Trail will prevent frequent (but illegal) track crossings in Cardiff. Villa responded that the aesthetics of the project will not impede the speed at which the undercrossing is built.
    Land is the theme of the undercrossing project and also the budget obstacle. The cost of grading and retaining land — and constructing pathways over and through it — presents a financial hurdle to Encinitas that grants may or may not resolve.
    There is much more in the article.

    I saw no announcements of this May 21st 2018 meeting. I might have missed it but I generally keep an eye out for such topic as I peruse the local media. Better community outreach is needed.

    Funding is a big issue. A lot of the discussion seems to be of aesthetics rather than utilitarian functionality. It seems every time bicyclist ask for a separated bike path, they get a multi-use path (MUP) to be shared with walkers, strollers, joggers, skaters, scooters and dog walkers. If you're going to lump all these users onto a single facility, it should be large enough to handle them all and to accommodate the expected growth in population and usage. Tarting the project up is all good and fine, but only if the primary, essential functionality has been met first.
  31.  
    In image above: Coming down from the Verdi Crosswalk (left side), the path seems to have multiple levels with multiple stairs. No ramp for ADA, bikes, or other rolling stock. It also seems that all the paths are narrow so big groups of people with bikes, surfboards, strollers, beach gear, etc will have difficulty passing each other.


    Build 'Stairchannels for Bikes' into sides of stairs so bikes can be pushed up or walked down.


    Bicycle access at transit stations

    Related Documents:
    Meeting Announcement
    City of Encinitas - Rail Corridor Vision Study
    City of Encinitas - Coastal Mobility & Livability Working Group
    Verdi-Montgomery Avenue Vicinity Pedestrian Rail Undercrossing Project
    Montgomery Avenue or Verdi Avenue?: A pedestrian undercrossing
    City of Encinitas - Montgomery At-Grade Pedestrian Rail Crossing
    2 ALTERNATIVES: Verdi Ave Pedestrian Rail Crossing
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2018
     
    They won't do the 'Stairchannels' for bikes.

    Can anyone guess why?

    (Hint, it has to do with discouraging another activity that cities take great measures to thwart on benches and curbs.)
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2018
     
    Note: I have been routinely cycling up the ramps to the trains at LA Union Station and no one has called me on it.

    The benefit of age I suppose.
    • CommentAuthort.e.d
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2018
     
    Require AVs to 'see' bicyclists and pedestrians


    http://p2a.co/Oy2UjKv
  32.  
    Bike Path Clean-Up Day to be held June 16, 2018
    News Desk June 07, 2018 times-advocate.com
    June 16 Escondido Shines will hold a Bike Path Clean-Up Day from 8:30–11:30 a.m. Everyone who wants to participate in beautifying the community a little bit will meet at the bike path entrance on Quince Avenue. That same day James the “Path Angel,” who has been escorting a bicyclist through a potentially dangerous section of bike path, will be honored with a new bike. But ONLY if the Go Fund Me effort raises enough money in time.
    Escondido resident Michele Taylor is passionate about riding the bicycle path. Each day she rides her bike to and from work. Unfortunately, she has had a few dangerous encounters with riff-raff on the bike path. She attempted to detour her route and instead, ride the main city streets. But she didn’t feel safe on the main streets due to all the traffic. According to Melissa Navarrete of Escondido Shines “Taylor reached out to law enforcement who have been very supportive in coming out to chase away any illegal activity during her rides. In addition, she posted on social media with hopes of encouraging others to ride the bike path. She thought that the more people who ride the path, the better the path will be; and the less riff-raff will come.”

    Unfortunately, she was accosted on more than one occasion on this path and one particular day, there were a group of roughnecks gathered around and over the path which blocked the path. Navarrete told The Times-Advocate, “She asked a gentleman, James, who was also on the path if he could escort her across that area. This gentleman happens to be an Air Force Veteran and now each day, rides with her through that same area. She affectionately named him her ‘Path Angel.’ ” Meanwhile, Michelle Taylor was so touched by James that she is hoping to raise enough money from community members to buy him a new bike and would like to present it to him on June 16 as the group begin our Bike Path Clean-Up.
  33.  



    Protected Bike Path With Parking on West Pt Loma Supported by Ocean Beach Planners

    Frank Gormlie June 11, 2018 obrag.org
    At their monthly meeting held Wednesday, June 6, the Ocean Beach Planning Board approved in concept a protected bike path along West Point Loma Avenue, between Nimitz and Sports Arena. The protected bike path, called a “cycle track”, would allow parking, much like the bike path does along sections of Wabaska Avenue near Voltaire Street in Point Loma.

    The Transportation sub-committee of the OBPB brought forward their response to a recommendation by the City’s Planning Department to install bike paths along West Pt. Loma Avenue. Apparently, the city had recommended removing parking along that busy street from Nimitz Blvd to Sports Arena Blvd, but the sub-committee presented a way to have both.

    Nicole Burgess, a member of the subcommittee, made the presentation; Nicole is the District 2 representative on the city’s bicycle advocacy panel. First, she went through the various classes of bike paths:
    • Class One – protected bike lane with berm or other physical divider;
    • Class Two – bike lane with painted lines;
    • Class Three – chevrons painted on road surface;
    • Class Four – Cycle Track

    Burgess explained that anytime the city is doing resurfacing on a roadway, there is an opportunity to check into whether bike paths or lanes are appropriate. And in December, West Pt Loma will be resurfaced and the city is proposing removing parking along the street in order to install bike lanes. In response, the Transportation subcommittee folks have come up with their own proposal: to install Cycle Track along West Pt Loma, which will put in a protected bike lane and keep the parking. Plus it would make the busy roadway less dangerous.

    This model, this Cycle Track, can be seen along Wabaska Drive near Voltaire Street. (See photos.) This type of configuration seems a win-win for both parking and bicyclists. The new configuration would reduce the 4 lanes of West Pt Loma down to 2, but keeping turn lanes.

    After some discussion, the Board passed a motion recommending the city evaluate and consider making West Pt Loma Avenue have a “road diet” of 4 down to 2 lanes, without removing parking and with protected bike lanes. It passed unanimously.




    Photos of Cycle Track along both sides of Wabaska Drive. (obrag.com)
  34.  
    La Jolla Town Council: new La Jolla fixed bike racks
    COREY LEVITAN June 20, 2018 lajollalight.com
    Parks & Beaches advisory group chair Ann Dynes introduced a design proposal for new La Jolla fixed bike racks at the Children’s Pool.

    “One of the beauties of this project is that the new bike rack is inside the budget of the Children’s Pool, so I’m not coming to you for your approval on that,” said Dynes, who distributed copies of the design to trustees. “I’m just saying that if we had a shared vision for a bike rack, then La Jolla Parks & Beaches would be open to the question of what would you rather have us put out there at the Children’s Pool, if not this?”

    The Town Council responded by passing a motion “supporting the concepts and the efforts, and agreeing with the design that Parks & Beaches decides upon.”
  35.  


    North County cycling advocates join Regional Bike Summit
    Kelli Kyle June 21, 2018 thecoastnews.com
    Since Douglas Alden was a young kid, he pedaled his bike around Solana Beach and the surrounding areas to get where he needed to go. “It’s always been a part of my DNA,” Alden said. “I biked to school when I was in elementary and junior high. I went to UCSD and lived at home and rode my bike to the university.”

    Four decades later, Alden still holds this same passion for cycling, riding to work at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography down in La Jolla several days a week. He also chairs BikeWalk Solana, an organization that helps the city establish cycling and pedestrian guidelines in Solana Beach by educating the community and raising awareness.

    This weekend, Alden will join up to 150 other cyclists in the county at the first annual San Diego Regional Bike Summit, a three-day conference hosted by the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition and held in Balboa Park. He said the summit will help cycling communities around the county learn how other cities are improving. The county’s so huge, so we need something like the regional summit,” Alden said. “There’s a lot of differences between what’s happening downtown and what’s happening up in North County.”
    On Alden’s turf in Solana Beach, a 2015 report showed that about 2.3 percent of people in the city commute by bicycle. This rate is high compared to the county, state and national biking averages, which come in at 1 percent and below. In May 2018, Solana Beach was recognized as a Bicycle Friendly City by the League of American Bicyclists.
    In North County, Alden said organizations like his work with legislators to keep improving infrastructure — like developing the Coastal Rail Trail and widening bike lanes when roads are repaved. Today especially, Alden said, local governments have an increased awareness of cycling culture and needs.

    “If you look at cities like Carlsbad, every time they reseal the street and they have an opportunity to redo the lanes, they’re narrowing the traffic lanes … and putting in bigger bike lanes often with painted buffers,” Alden said.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbikingbill
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2018
     
    Solana narrowed the bike lanes on 101 when they installed the serpentine walk-bike path.

    Just saying.